Julian Darius

In 1996, while still an undergraduate, Dr. Julian Darius founded what would become Sequart Research & Literacy Organization. After graduating magna cum laude from Lawrence University (Appleton, Wisconsin), he obtained his M.A. in English, authoring a thesis on John Milton and utopianism. In 2002, he moved to Waikiki, teaching college while obtaining an M.A. in French (high honors) and a Ph.D. in English. In 2011, he founded Martian Lit, which publishes creative work, including his comic book Martian Comics and his transgressive novel Nira/Sussa. He currently lives in Illinois.

BOOKS AND MOVIES BY JULIAN DARIUS

New Life and New Civilizations: Exploring Star Trek Comics (contributor)

This Lightning, This Madness: Understanding Alan Moore's Miracleman, Book One (author)

an analysis of Justice League and DC crossover history, examining classic works from a literary context

Classics on Infinite Earths: The Justice League and DC Crossover Canon (author)

a short documentary on Chris Claremont's historic run and its influence

Comics in Focus: Chris Claremont's X-Men (executive producer)

Warren Ellis: The Captured Ghosts Interviews (introduction)

Voyage in Noise: Warren Ellis and the Demise of Western Civilization (co-author)

Shot in the Face: A Savage Journey to the Heart of Transmetropolitan (contributor)

The Weirdest Sci-Fi Comic Ever Made: Understanding Jack Kirby's 2001: A Space Odyssey (author)

Essays exploring the whole of Daredevil's history.

The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and Daredevil (contributor)

Everything and a Mini-Series for the Kitchen Sink: Understanding Infinite Crisis (author)

Revisionism, Radical Experimentation, and Dystopia in Keith Giffen's Legion of Super-Heroes (author)

And the Universe so Big: Understanding Batman: The Killing Joke (author)

Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary Guide (contributor)

12 wildly-ranging, intelligent perspectives on Watchmen

Minutes to Midnight: Twelve Essays on Watchmen (contributor)

a documentary on the life and work of celebrated comics writer Grant Morrison

Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods (executive producer)

studies how Batman Begins appropriates and changes its comics source material

Improving the Foundations: Batman Begins from Comics to Screen (author)

a diverse essay collection on all aspects of Legion history

Teenagers from the Future: Essays on the Legion of Super-Heroes (contributor)

Not pictured:

TOP MAGAZINE CONTENT BY JULIAN DARIUS

Why Comics MatterWhy Comics Matter

The following video consists of a lecture I delivered on 5 January 2006 at Glen Carbon Centennial Library in Glen Carbon, Illinois. The total runtime is 46 minutes.

Miracleman #16 side viewWhy Miracleman Matters

Everybody talks about Miracleman, but few have read it. Far more people know of Miracleman’s importance than understand why it occupies such a crucial role in the history of super-hero comics.

The cover to Classics on Infinite EarthsThe DC Canon

This is the beginning of a series of articles on classic works of the DC Universe. It is the contention of this series that the DC Universe has been around long enough and has produced… [more]

The Walls of SamarisThe Obscure Cities: An Introduction

The Obscure Cities (Les Cités Obscures) arose in the midst of a pivotal time in the history of French comics. So let’s talk about French comics, shall we?

Mai, the Psychic Girl #1On Mai, the Psychic Girl

In early 1987, Eclipse introduced American comics readers to manga with three translated series. The first, debuting one week before the other two, was Mai, the Psychic Girl. The following week, Eclipse debuted The Legend… [more]

From Journey into Mystery #98How “Tales of Asgard” Changed Everything

In Journey into Mystery #83 (Aug 1962), Donald Blake finds a magical walking stick that transforms him into Thor. It’s a rather inauspicious beginning. In that first story, Thor fights stone-skinned aliens, who simply land… [more]

HAL, from 2001: A Space OdysseyOn Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey

Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is surely one of the strangest sci-fi franchise comics ever published. For one thing, the comic appeared in 1976, eight years after the 1968 film debuted. Most other sci-fi… [more]

Star Trek (Gold Key) #1 (July 1967)On the Very First Star Trek #1

Star Trek has a long history in comics. In fact, the very first Star Trek comic book began in 1967, at the end of the original series’s very first season. This first series was published… [more]

Warren EllisThe Very Different Worldviews of Warren Ellis and Grant Morrison

In an interview for Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts, Ellis recounts how some comics fans, in the wake of 9/11, expressed the wish that Superman were real, so he could have prevented such a devastating tragedy.… [more]

Moore / MorrisonOn the Moore / Morrison Feud, Literary Borrowings, and the Anxiety of Influence

It’s long been no secret, to those who paid attention, that Alan Moore and Grant Morrison — arguably the medium’s two most influential writers — don’t get along. But it’s been a slow simmer of… [more]

Comic Book Guy from The SimpsonsWhy Comics Have Failed to Achieve Real Respect

It might superficially seem as if comics have finally achieved respect. They’re covered by the mainstream press. They’re increasingly taught in colleges. Their adaptations account for a huge percentage of Hollywood blockbusters. Hey, even nerd… [more]

DC Countdown #1Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: DC Countdown

We’re now in the third month after DC Countdown, and it’s time to review the various top-selling mini-series and other events counting down to Infinite Crisis…

Understanding_ComicsThe Sequart Manifesto

What do we call our medium? The most common answer is “comics.” Some would say otherwise, offering “comix,” “the ninth art,” or “sequential art.” Others abroad would say “manga” or “les bandes-dessinés.” All, however, are… [more]

X-Men Vol. 1 #4X-Men is Not an Allegory of Racial Tolerance

It’s funny that it’s so resoundingly universally accepted. It’s been repeated so many times, from everyone from fans and comics professionals to scholars, that it’s become an article of faith.

OTHER MAGAZINE CONTENT BY JULIAN DARIUS (247 TOTAL)

Noir City #2Cody Walker on Noir City

Cody Walker, Webmaster here at Sequart, has put together a Kickstarter for the second issue of his comic book Noir City. JULIAN DARIUS: You and your co-writer, Rich G. Valerius, have been working on Noir City… [more]

V for Vendetta #4, page 3Rethinking V for Vendetta

I don’t think V for Vendetta works. I’ve always admired the comic. David Lloyd’s artwork is quite beautiful. I like the themes. As a writer, I especially admire the odd chapters that change perspective somehow, like the… [more]

Legion of Super-Heroes #31On “The Elements of Heartbreak”: A Special Valentine’s Day Post

Legion of Super-Heroes #31 (July 1992), co-written by Giffen and Tom & Mary Bierbaum, would go down in history as one of the most controversial Legion stories of all time. Taking a break from the… [more]

Will BrookerAn Apology to Dr. Will Brooker

When I wrote yesterday’s piece on Alan Moore’s most recent interview, I wasn’t aware that the “Batman scholar” Moore was mocking was Will Brooker. I feel really bad about not identifying him, because it perpetuates… [more]

The Mirror of LoveOn Alan Moore’s “Last” Interview

This post, which was about Alan Moore’s recent interview, has been removed. After its publication, I became aware that what I had written was factually inaccurate. I also became aware that what I had written… [more]

Breaking Bad final seasonHow the Final Season of Breaking Bad Invalidates the Entire Show

Don’t get me wrong: I’m a Breaking Bad fan. Hell, I watched the first episode when it aired for the first time, and I loved it. I loved the second episode too, in large part… [more]

Warm Bodies posterLoving the Other: Warm Bodies as Post-Post-9/11 Zombie Movie

It’s easy to dismiss the 2013 zombie film Warm Bodies as a mash-up between Romeo and Juliet and the zombie genre. It’s just as easy to guess that Hollywood saw this as a potential way… [more]

Amazing Spider-Man posterMaybe this Franchise Thing is Out of Control

It’s hard to believe, but there was a time when super-hero movies were few and far between. Now, they’re so ubiquitous that even super-hero fans worry there are too many. Marvel’s had success tying movies… [more]

The Night the Transformers Saved Christmas, page 1On “The Night the Transformers Saved Christmas”

Surely among the least-known early Transformers comics, “The Night the Transformers Saved Christmas” appeared in the 26 December 1985 issue of Woman’s Day magazine. The four-page story wasn’t an insert; it was printed on page… [more]

Comic Book Guy shrugsAlan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 5: Caveats Galore

Continued from last week. Perhaps at this point, I really ought to begin another round of caveats. First, I don’t regard the super-hero fans I’m describing as “emotionally subnormal,” nor do I think they’re representative… [more]

Santa Claus Conquers the MartiansAlan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 4: But Alan Moore’s Not Wrong

Continued from Wednesday. When talking about how super-heroes have changed, we always have to beware of nostalgia. The good old days weren’t all that good, and we tend to remember the comics, television, and movies… [more]

Marvel Miracleman #1What Marvel’s Miracleman #1 Preview Pages Indicate

A few days ago, Marvel released a five-page preview of its Miracleman #1, scheduled for 15 January publication. Having opined on what Marvel should do editorially with the series (and as the author of the… [more]

Watchmen manipulationAlan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 3: Alan Moore Needs a Hug

Continued from yesterday. For a man who’s such an indisputable master of language, Moore seems to be surprisingly unconscious of how his own words reveal aspects of his character. If a fictional character said writers… [more]

Moore Vs. MorrisonAlan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 2: Moore Vs. Morrison, Round the 898th

Continued from yesterday. In some cases, Moore’s claims not to have read works which he goes on to criticize might be read as a case of feigned ignorance as a form of politeness. The specific… [more]

Alan Moore on The SimpsonsAlan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 1: Promethea Didn’t Happen Now

Recently, Alan Moore’s made waves by criticizing the super-hero genre. Speaking with The Guardian, Moore said: I haven’t read any superhero comics since I finished with Watchmen. I hate superheroes. I think they’re abominations. They don’t mean what they… [more]

Fight Club soapWhy a Fight Club 2 Graphic Novel Could be a Game-Changer

In recent years, several high-profile novelists have turned to comics or allowed their work to be adapted. But Chuck Palahniuk doing so is something special, which just might actually lead to new comics readers — and… [more]

MAI VOL 4 CH 13 PG 250Super-Powers in Mai, the Psychic Girl’s Final Act

Continued from our introduction to Mai, the Psychic Girl and parts one and two of our discussion of how super-powers are depicted in the series. In the story’s truncated third and final act, Mai’s life has… [more]

screenshot from Oldboy (2003)Revenge, Hypnotism, and Oedipus in Oldboy (2003), Part 2

Last time, we began examining the 2003 South Korean movie Oldboy, directed by Park Chan-wook and adapted from the 1996-1998 manga by Garon Tsuchiya and Nobuaki Minegishi. We just got to the movie’s big twist ending. So be warned:… [more]

MAI VOL 3 CH 12 PG 230Super-Powers in Mai, the Psychic Girl’s Second Act

Continued from our introduction to Mai, the Psychic Girl and part one of our discussion of how super-powers are depicted in the series. As the narrative shifts into its second half, in which the Wisdom… [more]

screenshot from Oldboy (2003)Revenge, Hypnotism, and Oedipus in Oldboy (2003)

The brilliant 2003 South Korean film Oldboy, directed by directed by Park Chan-wook, is a revenge story. As such, it has to negotiate this genre’s long history, which it manages to do rather successfully by simultaneously… [more]

MAI VOL 1 CH 02 PG 058Super-Powers in Mai, the Psychic Girl

Continued from our introduction of Mai, the Psychic Girl. Ryoichi Ikegami is one of manga’s most talented artists, and he’s certainly one of my own favorites. His cityscapes and vehicles are bafflingly realistic. And while… [more]

The Day of the Doctor posterOn “The Day of the Doctor”

Warning: this article contains spoilers for “The Day of the Doctor,” the 50th-Anniversary Doctor Who Special. Blame it on the proliferation of soundbites. Or our declining attention spans. But there’s been a marked increase in… [more]

Batkid Saves CityReflections on Batkid

It’s easy to be cynical. Especially about super-heroes, in an era when they dominate the box office and opening weekends are debated for years before they happen. And then something like this happens. On Friday… [more]

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. posterThe Marvel Cinematic Universe is About to Become the Marvel TV Universe

One of the things that bugs me about franchises is that people rarely see them objectively, from a remove. The most fondly remembered installments overshadow everything else, even when “everything else” is the larger work.… [more]

Young Miracleman in Miracleman #6, page 5Fitting Young Miracleman’s “Quiet Desperation” into Miracleman, Book Two

We’ve discussed the silent Young Miracleman story (parts one and two) originally printed in Warrior #12. Today, we discuss how to understand that story as part of Book Two. (If you’re new, hop to the introduction,… [more]

Thor: The Dark World posterI’d Need a Lobotomy to Enjoy Thor: The Dark World

It’s hard to find the words to adequately describe how stupid Thor: The Dark World is. Before I try, a warning: this review contains spoilers. Don’t say I didn’t warn you. And in case you’re… [more]

Young Miracleman in Warrior #12, page 4Sex and Nuclear Armageddon in Young Miracleman’s “Quiet Desperation”

We’ve begun discussing the silent Young Miracleman story originally printed in Warrior #12. Today, we continue that discussion. (If you’re new, hop to the introduction, to the beginning of Book One, or to the interlude… [more]

Young Miracleman in Miracleman #6Miracleman, Book Two: “Quiet Desperation”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed all ten chapters of Book One (starting here), along with the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit,” which were originally published in Warrior #1-11. We now begin Book Two… with the… [more]

Miracleman logoEditing Miracleman: How Marvel Can Do It Right

The long-awaited news has broken, over the weekend, that Marvel plans to finally move forward on its reprinting of Miracleman, beginning with Alan Moore’s issues, moving through Neil Gaiman’s, and culminating by allowing Gaiman and… [more]

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 8Miracleman, Book One Concludes

We’ve begun discussing the conclusion of Book One (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of this historic… [more]

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 8Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Epilogue

We’ve begun discussing the conclusion of Book One (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of this historic chapter.

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 7Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Rage of Miracleman

We’ve begun discussing the conclusion of Book One (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of this historic chapter.

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 6Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Secret Origin of Miracleman Concludes

We’ve begun discussing the conclusion of Book One (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of this historic chapter.

from Miracleman, chapter 10, page 5 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Secret Origin of Big Ben, Part 2

We’ve begun discussing the conclusion of Book One (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of this chapter.

from Miracleman, chapter 10, page 5 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Secret Origin of Big Ben

We’ve begun discussing the conclusion of Book One (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of this chapter.

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 4Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Secret Origin of Miracleman, Part 3

We’ve begun discussing chapter ten, the conclusion of Book One (parts one, two, three, and four), of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 3Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Secret Origin of Miracleman, Part 2

We’ve begun discussing chapter ten, the conclusion of Book One (parts one, two, and three), of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

killing joke -- hand pageOn Interpreting The Killing Joke’s Ending (and Authorial Intent)

For his podcast Fatman on Batman, Kevin Smith interviewed Grant Morrison, and Grant talked about how Batman kills the Joker at the end of Batman: The Killing Joke. Grant makes a good argument, citing textual… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 10, page 3 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 10: The Secret Origin of Miracleman

We’ve begun discussing chapter ten, the conclusion of Book One (parts one and two), of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 2Miracleman, Chapter 10 as a Mystery Story

We’ve begun discussing chapter ten, the conclusion of Book One, of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

from Miracleman #3, chapter 10, page 2Miracleman, Chapter 10: “Zarathustra”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed all but the final chapter of Book One. We now continue this critical examination with chapter ten (written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Alan Davis) of this celebrated but long-unavailable series that… [more]

The Wolverine (2013) posterHalf Action Movie, Half Art Film, The Wolverine Delivers

The Wolverine has everything fans require. It’s got lots of great actions sequences, culminating in a big showdown. But it’s also got some art-film DNA in the mix. It’s an action film that also works… [more]

Miracleman #3, chapter 9, page 7Miracleman, Chapter 9 Concludes

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6), illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

Miracleman #3, chapter 9, page 4Miracleman, Chapter 9: The Masculinity of Miracleman

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

Ender's Game posterWhy I’m (Proudly, this Time) Boycotting Orson Scott Card

Having weighed in on the Orson Scott Card controversy earlier this year, when he was hired to write Superman, I feel compelled to weigh in now that he’s issued his non-apology apology. The controversy earlier… [more]

Miracleman #3, chapter 9, page 3Miracleman, Chapter 9: The Avoidance of Liz Moran

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman (parts 1, 2, 3, and 4), illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

Dexter #1Not Your Television’s Dexter: On Dexter #1, from Marvel Comics

Dexter #1 Writer: Jeff Lindsay. Art: Dalibor Talajic. Cover: Michael del Mundo. Variant cover #1: Dalibor Talajic. Variant cover #2: Ive Svorcina. Publisher: Marvel Comics. I’m a sucker for serial killers. They’re my guilty pleasure. I… [more]

The Man of Steel (2013)Why Opposing “Dark Realism” is a Straw Man Argument

For years now, I’ve heard people complain about how it’s time that super-heroes weren’t so dark and realistic. I’ve heard this relentlessly about super-hero comics, but I’ve also heard it about super-hero movies. Most recently,… [more]

Man of Steel posterZack Snyder’s Revisionist The Man of Steel

The Man of Steel is very much Zack Snyder’s. But that doesn’t mean what we thought it did. (As usual, here there be spoilers.) Prior to the film’s release, super-hero fans had a lot of… [more]

page 2 of the recolored How Superman Would End the WarOn “How Superman Would Win the War”

One of the best Superman stories – and probably one of the most important super-hero stories ever told – is also one of the shortest. What’s more, the story didn’t appear in a Superman comic;… [more]

from Miracleman #3, chapter 9, page 2Miracleman, Chapter 9: The Mentality of Big Ben

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman (parts 1, 2, and 3), illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

The Wolverine teaser posterThe Other Marvel Cinematic Universe?

With all of the attention paid to the development of the Marvel cinematic universe, it’s worth addressing the other Marvel cinematic universe: the one run by 20th Century-Fox.

2010 movie posterJack Kirby Vs. Arthur C. Clarke: A Tale of Two 2001 Continuations

Having introduced Jack Kirby’s 2001, looked at his adaptation of the film, and looked at the first few issues of his continuation, let’s look at his continuation of that film — and how it contrasts… [more]

from Jack Kirby's 2001, A Space Odyssey #4On Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey Continuation, Part 2

Having introduced Jack Kirby’s 2001, and looked at his adaptation of the film and the first issue of his bizarre continuation, let’s continue examining one of the oddest sci-fi comics in history.

from 2001, A Space Odyssey #1, page 9On Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey Continuation

Having introduced Jack Kirby’s 2001, and looked at his adaptation of the film, let’s look at his continuation of that film.

Jack Kirby's adaptation of 2001: A Space OdysseyOn Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey Adaptation (Part 2)

Continuing an examination of Jack Kirby’s adaptation of 2001: A Space Odyssey begun here. Kirby’s more successful at other points in this chapter, and he seems to thrive on the conflict in this section of… [more]

2001 adaptation page 9On Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey Adaptation

Introduced yesterday. Before Jack Kirby continued the story of 2001, he adapted the film into a 70-page comic. Although the comic adapts the film — it uses Jupiter, for example, whereas the novel used Saturn… [more]

Enterprise (Star Trek into Darkness still)Star Trek into Darkness Hostile to Star Trek, Intelligence

Before we continue, I need to issue the obligatory spoiler warning. In order to really get at what’s going on in this film, I’ll have to talk about its plot. So if you haven’t seen… [more]

Record15_BigOn the Star Trek Peter Pan Records of 1979

In the last two days, we’ve discussed the seven original Star Trek stories produced by Peter Pan Records in 1975-1976 (parts one and two). Today, we look at the company’s 1979 Star Trek offerings. The… [more]

Star Trek Peter Pan Record #2On the Star Trek Peter Pan Records of 1975-1976 (Batch Two)

Yesterday, we discussed the Star Trek stories produced by Peter Pan Records, including the first three stories. Today, we continue that discussion. “The Time Stealer” “The Time Stealer,” the first track on the second 12″… [more]

Record1_BigOn the Star Trek Peter Pan Records of 1975-1976

People who grew up in the 1970s and 1980s will likely remember Peter Pan Records (and its imprint Power Records), which published original audio stories featuring licensed properties during this time. Peter Pan Records actually… [more]

Star Trek UK headerThe British Star Trek

While U.S. publisher Gold Key was busy printing Star Trek comic books, Britain had its own Star Trek comics. Comic strips, to be more accurate.

Star Trek (Gold Key) #56On Gold Key’s Guardian of Forever (in Star Trek Vol. 1 #56)

On Monday, we talked about Gold Key’s Star Trek #1 from 1967, which had the ship exploring the dead Galaxy Alpha, then systematically eradicating the one planet it found with life one it. Oh yeah,… [more]

Iron Man 3 poster #2Why Iron Man 3 is the Best Iron Man Film to Date

Iron Man 3 might not be an Avengers-like, nonstop action fest. But it’s the best of the three Iron Man films. In fact, it’s the only one that really understands the character.

Underworld Unleashed #1On Underworld Unleashed, Precursor to Kingdom Come

DC’s 1995 crossover Underworld Unleashed — scripted by Mark Waid, penciled by Howard Porter, and published as a three extra-long monthly issues (though the third issue ran late) – featured no less than Satan as its villain.… [more]

Armageddon 2001 #1On Armageddon 2001 and the Annual-Based Crossover

Armageddon 2001 was the first DC universe-wide crossover to run through the company’s annuals. The central mini-series of Armageddon 2001 was only two issues long, acting as “bookends” to the tie-ins, which ran exclusively through… [more]

Patrick Meaney at SDCCPatrick Meaney: The Sequart Interview

Patrick Meaney is the author of Our Sentence is Up, as well as essays in several Sequart anthologies and a contributor to Sequart.org. He’s also the director of Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods and Warren… [more]

Warren Ellis's SupergodOn Warren Ellis’s Super-Hero Work at Avatar

We’ve previously looked at Warren Ellis’s realistic worldview, at his much-celebrated 1999-2003 period, and at his work for Marvel from 2004-2010. One of the more interesting developments of Ellis’s career, especially given his professed distaste… [more]

Ultimate Galactus TrilogyWarren Ellis at Marvel, 2004-2010

We’ve previously looked at Warren Ellis’s overall realistic worldview and how this is reflected in the revisionism of his much-celebrated 1999-2003 period. We now turn to his work at Marvel from 2004-2010.

Stormwatch imageWarren Ellis, Revisionism, and Reconstructionism

Last time, we discussed how Warren Ellis is a realist, and we contrasted this with the views of Grant Morrison. These two modes correlate strongly with two different modes of super-hero stories.  Revisionism, most frequently… [more]

The Complete PersepolisOn Chicago Public Schools Censoring Persepolis‘s Images of Torture

In the recent discussions over censorship of Persepolis in Chicago public schools, there’s been a notable lack of discussion over why anyone would want the book removed — and what such reasoning represents.

from Miracleman, chapter 9, page 1 (Warrior version)Ancestral Jungles and Voodoo Fears: Evelyn Cream and Race in Miracleman, Chapter 9 (Part 2)

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman (parts one and two), illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

from Miracleman, chapter 9, page 1 (Warrior version)Evelyn Cream and Race in Miracleman, Chapter 9

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

from Miracleman, chapter 9, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 9: “Inside Story”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, and eight, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit.” We now continue this critical examination with chapter nine (written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Alan Davis) of this celebrated but… [more]

MSCSI PREVIEW FRONT PAGE DAHLIAWill Brooker on My So-Called Secret Identity

Will Brooker is Reader in Film and Television Studies at Kingston University, London, and editor of Cinema Journal. He is also author, editor or co-editor of nine books, including Batman Unmasked, Using the Force, Alice’s… [more]

Orson Scott CardOrson Scott Card, Homophobia, and Superman

DC provoked outrage, a few days ago, by hiring Orson Scott Card, sci-fi writer and noted homophobe, to write Superman. The comic in question isn’t one of DC’s current titles. In fact, it’s a new,… [more]

page from Invasion #3On Invasion #3: “World Without Heroes”

We previously introduced Invasion and discussed its first and second issues. Today, we conclude our look at Invasion with issue #2. Invasion #3 begins with this same explosion, revealed to be a “gene bomb” released… [more]

page from Invasion #2On Invasion #2: “Battleground Earth”

We previously introduced Invasion and discussed its first issue. Today, we continue with issue #2. By the time Invasion #2 (titled “Battleground Earth”) begins, Superman has successfully negotiated a 24-hour cease-fire with the Dominators. Many… [more]

final page of Invasion #1On Invasion #1: “The Alien Alliance”

We previously introduced Invasion. Today, we look at the first issue in more detail. None of this is to say that the mini-series isn’t also a lot of fun. As previously stated, the first issue… [more]

Invasion #1On Invasion, Written by Keith Giffen and Bill Mantlo

Published in late 1988 as a three-issue monthly crossover mini-series, the central premise of Invasion (titled Invasion!, with an exclamation mark, on the cover) was simple: aliens invade the Earth. The series was plotted by Keith… [more]

page from DC One Million #4On DC One Million, by Grant Morrison and Val Semeiks (Part 3)

In which we continue our discussion of DC One Million, begun here and continued here. Above Earth, Green Lantern has joined the heroes fighting a losing battle against Solaris. Solaris isn’t prepared for Green Lantern’s ring, and… [more]

DC One Million #3On DC One Million, by Grant Morrison and Val Semeiks (Part 2)

In which we continue our discussion of DC One Million, begun here. As issue #2 opens, the present-day narrative has caught up with the Montevideo explosion. The Justice Legion A, infected with the virus, joins… [more]

page from DC One Million #1On DC One Million, by Grant Morrison and Val Semeiks

DC One Million was published in September 1998 (the month cover-dated Nov 1998) as a weekly four-issue mini-series – or almost weekly, since the JLA tie-in issue effectively served as an issue of the mini-series.… [more]

Secret Wars #1 (May 1984)Secret Wars, Crisis on Infinite Earths, and the Development of the Universe-Wide Crossover

While Crisis on Infinite Earths was DC’s first universe-wide crossover, there’s some dispute over whether it was the first in comics. The answer largely depends on one’s definitions. Whatever one thinks about this, one shouldn’t… [more]

Alan Moore's Swamp ThingAlan Moore on the Couch

Previously, we’ve discussed and dismissed the charges that Alan Moore or Grant Morrison ripped off anyone in any serious way. We next discussed the timeline of Grant Morrison’s career, including his hiring at DC. We… [more]

Saga of the Swamp Thing, Book OneThe Moore Narrative of Comics History

Last time, we discussed the anxiety of influence and the silliness of thinking that Moore ripped off Superfolks or that Morrison ripped off Moore. This time, I’d like to look at why these charges persist… [more]

Doctor Who titlecardWhy I’m Down on Moffat

I love Doctor Who, but I’ve soured on Steven Moffat. I really didn’t want to write this, because I’ve really enjoyed Moffat’s Doctor Who. But I’ve long had deep reservations about it. I’ve kept these thoughts to myself,… [more]

from Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 6 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8 Concludes

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, three, four, and five) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we conclude our exploration of that chapter.

From Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: The Flashback Pages

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, three, and four) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

from Miracleman, chapter 8, page 7 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Introducing Big Ben

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, and three) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve also previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 8, page 3 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Rocket Launchers, Flamethrowers, and Racism

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one and two) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well as… [more]

from Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 1 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Two Ninja Vs. Superman

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well as the interlude “The… [more]

Miracleman #3Miracleman, Chapter 8: “Out of the Dark”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit.” We now continue our examination with chapter eight of this celebrated but long-unavailable series, written by Alan Moore and… [more]

Justice League #5 (Sept 1987)On the First Year of Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’ Justice League International (Part 2)

We previously examined the first four issues of Giffen and DeMatteis’ seminal Justice League from 1987-1988. Today, we conclude our examination of that title’s first year, which works as its own unit.

Justice League #1 (May 1987)On the First Year of Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’ Justice League International

While Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’s run on Justice League (retitled Justice League International with #7) is fondly remembered, it’s worth looking at how that title’s first year, published from 1987 to 1988, develops and… [more]

Batman: Gotham Knight DVDThoughts on the Animated Batman: Gotham Knight

Since I’ve written about Batman Begins, I thought it might be nice to write about its follow-up. No, not The Dark Knight. Chronologically, Batman Begins is followed by Batman: Gotham Knight, a made-for-video collection of six… [more]

Crisis on Infinite Earths #7On Crisis on Infinite Earths

DC’s first universe-wide crossover was the 12-issue Crisis on Infinite Earths (Apr 1985 – Mar 1986). Written by Marv Wolfman and penciled by George Pérez, the team responsible for DC then-hit New Teen Titans, Crisis was designed to… [more]

mega-city-one-from-dredd-2012Building a Better Dredd: The Smart Narrative Choices of Dredd

Earlier, we discussed how Dredd is faithful to its source material, to the extent that it could be described as a violent morality play. Today, I’d like to discuss the film’s narrative choices, because I… [more]

Dredd (2012) posterDredd as Violent Morality Play

Dredd is a far better, smarter, and well-made film than anyone had a right to respect. It gets nearly everything right. It’s visually beautiful, even when disgusting. It’s entertaining. But it’s also disturbing and thought-provoking.… [more]

JLA: Heaven's LadderOn Mark Waid and Bryan Hitch’s JLA

With Grant Morrison’s departure from JLA in 2000, DC made the absolute best decisions possible for the title’s new creative team. As writer, DC chose Mark Waid. Waid had written Kingdom Come (which had inspired… [more]

Justice League of America #71 (May 1969)On Denny O’Neil and Dick Dillin’s Justice League of America

While many celebrate Gardner Fox’s inaugural run on Justice League of America, comparatively few appreciate the run that immediately followed it: that of Dennis “Denny” O’Neil and penciler Dick Dillin (who had illustrated Fox’s final two… [more]

Super Powers V2 #6On Super Powers (second series), by Paul Kupperberg and Jack Kirby

The six-issue, second Super Powers mini-series from 1985, written by Paul Kupperberg, penciled by Jack Kirby, and inked by Greg Theakston, has been almost completely ignored by critics.

The Weird #2On The Weird, by Jim Starlin and Bernie Wrightson

The 1988 four-issue mini-series The Weird — written by Jim Starlin, with art by legendary comics artist Bernie Wrightson and inks by Dan Green — isn’t told from the Justice League’s point of view. Rather,… [more]

JLA: Earth 2On JLA: Earth 2, by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely

Like many classic comics from the 1980s onward, JLA: Earth 2 (the 1999 original graphic novel written by Grant Morrison with art by Frank Quitely) plays with comics history in a postmodern way, offering new… [more]

Kingdom Come SupermanOn Kingdom Come, by Mark Waid and Alex Ross

1996’s Kingdom Come — a self-contained, fully-painted series by writer Mark Waid and artist Alex Ross — was first published as a four-issue, prestige-format mini-series, designated as an Elseworlds (i.e. out-of-continuity) tale.  The story was… [more]

Miracleman, chapter 7, bottom of page 7 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 7 Concludes

We’ve begun discussing chapter seven (parts one, two, and three) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we conclude our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and… [more]

The Sun's "Gotcha" headlineMiracleman, Chapter 7, and British Politics

We’ve begun discussing chapter seven (in two parts) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six,… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 7, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 7: The Mike / Liz / Miracleman Love Triangle

We’ve begun discussing chapter seven of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six, plus the… [more]

Miracleman, chapter 7, top of page 2 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 7: “Blue Murder”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit.” We now continue our examination with chapter seven of this celebrated but long-unavailable series,… [more]

Christopher Nolan publicity stillThe Road to Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins

We’ve previously examined the road to Christopher Nolan taking over the Batman film franchise, from Batman and Robin through Frank Miller’s “Year One” screenplay. This installment concludes the story, taking us up to Batman Begins.… [more]

Bane (from The Dark Knight Rises)Why The Dark Knight Rises Fails

Let me start by saying that I’m glad if you like The Dark Knight Rises. I wanted to. I wrote a book about Batman Begins. I love The Dark Knight, and its ending makes me… [more]

Batman #404Frank Miller’s Year One Screenplay

Late 2000 seems, by all accounts, to have been a turning point for the languishing Batman franchise. It was then that both Batman: DarKnight and the live-action Batman Beyond were cancelled, with Warner Bros. focusing… [more]

Improving the Foundations: Batman Begins from Comics to ScreenUnproduced Attempts to Film Batman’s Origins

Batman Begins was, in fact, preceded by other attempts to dramatize Batman’s origins, both on film and on television. In 1999, one production company proposed a weekly series about the boyhood of Bruce Wayne prior… [more]

from Planetary #20Warren Ellis and the Fantastic Four

Warren Ellis hates super-heroes. At least, that’s what people say. He certainly has played his part, through a few off-the-cuff remarks, in this misconception. But it would be more accurate to say that Ellis hates… [more]

The Fever of Urbicande, bottom of page 45The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 4 Concludes

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue (and some of its implications), as well as chapters one, two, three (in two parts), and most of four (parts one, two, and three). We now conclude our… [more]

from Fever of Urbicande, page 42More The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 4

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue (and some of its implications), as well as chapters one, two, three (in two parts), and most of four (in two parts). We now continue our look… [more]

from The Fever of Urbicande, page 41The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 4 (Cont.)

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue (and some of its implications), as well as chapters one, two, three (in two parts), and the beginning of four. Although it’s been a while, we… [more]

from Miracleman, Chapter 6, page 8 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 6 Concludes

We’ve previously begun discussion of chapter six of Alan Moore’s Miracleman and continued through page five. We now conclude discussion of this pivotal chapter.

from Miracleman, Chapter 6, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 6: “Investigation” and “Deduction”

We’ve previously begun discussion of chapter six of Alan Moore’s Miracleman and gotten through page three. We now continue discussion of this pivotal chapter.

from Miracleman, chapter 6, page 3 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 6, Page 3: “Reflections” of Kid Miracleman

We’ve previously begun discussion of chapter six of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, which originally appeared in the classic British magazine Warrior. We continue that discussion today.

Warrior #7 back coverMiracleman, Chapter 6: “Secret Identity”

Having introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, and five, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit,” we now turn to chapter six of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, which originally appeared in the classic… [more]

AnorexiaOn Body Typing in Comics: What We’re Not Saying and Why It Matters

This is not an essay I wanted to write. Doing so, I’m conscious of wading into waters famous for their landmines. This is at least the sixth full draft of this essay. Most of the… [more]

From the Dark Phoenix sagaAlan Moore’s Miracleman and the Influence of Chris Claremont’s Dark Phoenix Saga

Having reached the halfway point of Book One, let’s pause and consider the influence of Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s Dark Phoenix saga on the way Moore presents his own hero-turned-villain, Kid Miracleman.

from Miracleman, chapter 5, page 7 (Warrior version)The Conclusion of Miracleman, Chapter 5

We’ve looked at chapter five of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, examined it in the context of the 1981 Brixton riots, and carried through to Kid Miracleman’s defeat. We now conclude our look at this chapter, originally printed… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 5, page 5 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 5 (Cont.)

We’ve begun looking at chapter five of Alan Moore’s Miracleman and examined its reference to the 1981 Brixton riots. We now continue our look at this story, originally printed in Warrior #6 (Oct 1982), which concludes Miracleman’s… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 5, page 3Miracleman, Chapter 5, and the Brixton Riots

Last time, we began our examination of chapter five of Alan Moore’s Miracleman. Originally printed in Warrior #6 (Oct 1982), it concludes Miracleman’s fight with Kid Miracleman and marks the midpoint of Book One.

Miracleman #2Miracleman, Chapter 5: “Fallen Angels, Forgotten Thunder”

Having introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, third, and fourth chapters, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit,” we now turn to chapter five of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, which concludes the hero’s first… [more]

Colin Smith in Q magazineColin Smith in Q Magazine

The May 2012 issue of Q magazine debuts a new comics review column, written by none other than Colin Smith, Sequart friend and mainstay. And although Colin’s keen to emphasize that he’s hardly taken over the magazine,… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 4, title page (Eclipse version only)Miracleman, Chapter 4: “Dragons” (Cont.)

Last time, we began discussing the fourth chapter of Alan Moore’s Miracleman. This time, we conclude our look at that chapter.

From Miracleman, chapter 4, page 2 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 4: “Dragons”

Having introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, and third chapters, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit,” we now turn to chapter four of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, in which the hero has his… [more]

From "The Yesterday Gambit," page 9“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 4

We’ve introduced Alan Moore’s Miracleman interlude from Warrior #4, “The Yesterday Gambit,” and examined its first, second, and third segments. We now turn to its final segment, illustrated by Steve Dillon, in which Miracleman and Warpsmith return… [more]

From "The Yesterday Gambit," page 6“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 3

We’ve introduced Alan Moore’s Miracleman interlude from Warrior #4, “The Yesterday Gambit,” and examined its first and second segments. We now turn to its third segment, illustrated by Alan Davis, in which Miracleman and Warpsmith revisit… [more]

from "The Yesterday Gambit," page 5“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 2

We’ve introduced Alan Moore’s Miracleman interlude from Warrior #4, “The Yesterday Gambit”, and examined its first segment. We now turn to its second segment, illustrated by Paul Neary, in which Miracleman and Warpsmith revisit the 1963… [more]

from "The Yesterday Gambit," page 1“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 1

We began discussion of “The Yesterday Gambit” last time, having previously introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, and third chapters. We now turn to the story of Alan Moore’s “The Yesterday Gambit,” from Warrior #4.

Warrior #4 (Summer 1982)“The Yesterday Gambit” (A Miracleman Interlude)

We’ve introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, and third chapters. We now turn to the famous “The Yesterday Gambit,” from Warrior #4.

from Miracleman, Chapter 3, page 6 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 3 Concludes

We’ve introduced Miracleman and discussed its first and second chapters, plus most of the third (part one, part two). We now conclude our look at this third chapter of Alan Moore and Garry Leach’s Miracleman… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 3, page 2 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 3: “When Johnny Comes Marching Home”

We’ve introduced Miracleman and discussed its first and second episodes, plus the first page of chapter three. We now continue our look at that third chapter of Alan Moore and Garry Leach’s Miracleman stories, which… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 3, page 1 (Eclipse version)Sex and the Super-Hero in Miracleman, Chapter 3

Having briefly introduced Miracleman and discussed its first and second episodes, let’s turn to the third of Alan Moore and Garry Leach’s Miracleman stories, which appeared in the legendary British magazine Warrior.

Warrior #2 (Apr 1982)Miracleman, Chapter 2: “Legend”

Having briefly introduced Miracleman and discussed its first episode, let’s turn to the second of Alan Moore and Garry Leach’s earliest stories, which appeared in the legendary British magazine Warrior.

Miracleman #1Miracleman, Chapter 1: “A Dream of Flying”

Having briefly introduced Miracleman, let’s begin looking at Alan Moore and Garry Leach’s earliest stories, which appeared in the legendary British magazine Warrior.

Holy Terror pageReading Holy Terror’s First Act

After its three-page thematic introductory sequence, Holy Terror shifts to the Fixer chasing Cat Burglar across Empire City’s rooftops. It’s a sequence not without its charms, including a few powerful images. It depicts an eccentric, hard-boiled… [more]

Holy Terror page 3Reading Holy Terror‘s Introductory Sequence

It’s hard for me to describe the mixture of pleasures and pains, both of them quite intense, that I feel reading Holy Terror. The pleasure tends to be artistic, primarily visual. The pain tends to… [more]

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationSequart Podcast #1: The Changing Format of Comics

Guests Kevin Thurman and David Balan discuss the future of the comics form, and the implications of digital comics.

un Chien AndalouA Place for Bold: Understanding Frank Miller

No one seems to get Frank Miller. Despite the flurry of digital ink spilled over him, most critics seem to be left scratching their heads. Indeed, the entire body of Frank Miller criticism can now… [more]

The Fever of Urbicande, top of page 38The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 4

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue (and some of that prologue’s implications), as well as chapters one, two, and three (in two parts). This time, we’ll begin to look at chapter four,… [more]

The Fever of Urbicande, bottom of page 26The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 3 (Cont.)

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue, some of that prologue’s implications, chapter one, chapter two, and the beginning of chapter three. This time, we’ll conclude our look at chapter three, in which the… [more]

The Fever of Urbicande, bottom of page 20The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 3

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue, some of that prologue’s implications, and chapters one and two. This time, we’ll continue to chapter three of this fascinating story.

from The Fever of Urbicande, page 15The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 2

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue, some of that prologue’s implications, and chapter one of the comic proper. This time, we’ll continue into chapter two of this fascinating story.

from The Fever of Urbicande, page 5The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 1

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue and some of its implications. This time, we’ll dive into the story itself.

Palace of the Soviets (from Mechanix Illustrated, Sept 1939)The Fever of Urbicande: Ayn Rand, Totalitarian Architecture, Brutalism, and Busselization

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue, which sets up Eugen Robick’s status quo as the story starts. This time, we’ll explore some fascinating parallels and implications of that status quo. Also, I’ve… [more]

Fever in UrbicandeThe Fever of Urbicande: A French Masterpiece You Probably Haven’t Read

More than any other, this is the the book for which The Obscure Cities is famous. In his afterword to The Walls of Samaris, Benoît Peeters writes that his main criticism of that initial volume… [more]

The Big Lie #1 coverOn The Big Lie, by Rich Veitch and Gary Erskine

Before addressing this controversial comic, let’s establish one thing: anything by Rick Veitch is newsworthy and deserving of better than being written off. Veitch is one of the legends who renewed American comics in the… [more]

from Ultimate Spider-Man Vol. 3 #1, page 11Eight Thoughts on Ultimate Spider-Man Vol. 3 #1-2

The right-wing media went apeshit over Peter Parker being replaced by Miles Morales, based on a single seven-page sequence (really its own short story) in Ultimate Fallout #4. Lots of people were perfectly prepared to… [more]

from Red Hood and the Outlaws #1, page 10, as originally colored (with Starfire in a transparent bikini)How Could They Do That?: Understanding Scott Lobdell and the New Comics Criticism

I’m quite certain writer Scott Lobdell, writer of Red Hood and the Outlaws, didn’t intend to make Starfire in any way diminishing of women. I know this because it’s leaked that DC was concerned, prior… [more]

Red Hood and the Outlaws #1, page 10Sexism, Sexuality, and the DC Relaunch

Last week’s DC relaunch offerings didn’t prompt much serious debate over which title was the best, but they launched a flurry of reactions against their portrayal of women. But first, a warning: my goal here… [more]

Superman Returns Prequel #4, bottom of page 30Superman Returns Prequel #4: Lois Lane

Five years ago, around the release of Superman Returns, I began a look at its four-part prequel mini-series, examining how it changed Richard Donner’s original films and what it revealed about Superman’s five years of… [more]

The Walls of Samaris -- sundew motifThe Walls of Samaris, Part 4: Textual Variants

We’ve previously examined the story of The Walls of Samaris, a French masterpiece that deserves to be known among comics-literate Americans. In part two, we looked at several implications of its trompe-d’oeil device. In part three, I wrapped up… [more]

Justice League International (2011) #1Justice League International #1 Review

It’s hard to put into words how silly Justice League International #1 is. On the one hand, it’s written in a style that’s a throwback to the very early 1990s. That shouldn’t be a total surprise:… [more]

Action Comics #1, top of page 9Not Your Daddy’s Superman: How Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #1 Works

Having slammed Justice League #1 so severely in the last week, I feel as if I’d be remiss not to point out how excellent Action Comics #1 is and how it gets right virtually everything… [more]

Captain Picard facepalmHollow Spectacle (or How Super-Hero Comics Warped My Logic Circuit)

There’s nothing wrong with spectacle. Even, I’d argue, for its own sake. Hell, it used to be its own genre of Hollywood movie (e.g. Cleopatra and more recently Gladiator)! But there’s good and bad spectacle,… [more]

Justice League #1, top of page 4How Not to Relaunch a Universe: A Negative Review of Justice League #1

How bad is Justice League #1, written by Geoff Johns and penciled by Jim Lee? It’s virtually a road map for how not to write super-hero comics.

The Walls of Samaris - final panelThe Walls of Samaris, Part 3: More Mysteries… and Some Possible Solutions

We’ve previously examined the story of The Walls of Samaris, a French masterpiece that deserves to be known among comics-literate Americans. In part two, we looked at several implications of its trompe-d’oeil device.

The Walls of Samaris, panel from the top of page 3The Walls of Samaris, Part 2: The Trompe-d’Oeil and You

Having introduced The Obscure Cities and walked through its first volume, The Walls of Samaris in some detail, I ended with that book’s conclusion. I’ll pick up there, so it’s necessary that you read part… [more]

DC cinematic universe logoThe Simple, Elegant Way to a DC Cinematic Universe

There’s a simple solution to DC’s motion-picture woes: stop following Marvel’s model. Marvel’s shared cinematic universe only proceeded the way it did due to accidents of history.

The Walls of Samaris, bottom of page 9The Walls of Samaris: A Classic French Comic You Probably Haven’t Read

Many fans of The Obscure Cities (which I introduced here) will tell you that the first volume, The Walls of Samaris, first collected in 1983, represents a freshman effort, despite the acclaim it’s won.

Superman Annual #11 (1985)Sex and “The Man who Has Everything”

Long before Alan Moore delved into literary pornography with Lost Girls, he was infusing his work with a broad understanding of human sexuality as natural. And this wasn’t limited to auteur projects like Lost Girls… [more]

Superman- The Wedding Album #1 (Dec 1996)Undoing Super-Hero Marriages: The Failure of the Writerly Imagination

With the news that Superman and Lois Lane will no longer be married after DC’s relaunch, super-hero comics have said loudly and clearly: they hate their characters being married because it makes for less drama.

Super-hero comics have a long history of depicting or suggesting sexual assault.Colin Smith on Comics Criticism, Part 2

Continuing from part one, we now move on to discuss when it’s fair to criticize a work for depicting human rights violations such as torture and rape, writing personally, and comics culture.

Men of Tomorrow, by Gerard JonesColin Smith on Comics Criticism

As a medium, comics are in a strange place. In many ways, we as comics scholars and advocates have achieved the respect we long sought.

Or can All-Star Superman point to the future of the genre?Roundtable on Current Super-Hero Comics, the Problem of Nostalgia, and the Genre’s Future

Depending on whom you ask, current super-hero comics are either sub-competent exercises in nostalgia or exciting, dynamic explorations of heroism, adapted for contemporary times.

In the words of Blink 182, "What's my age again?"Canada Hates Comics

Canadian customs officials have charged a U.S. citizen with possession of child pornography based on his possession of manga comics on a digital device. If found guilty, he faces a minimum of one year in prison…… [more]

Justice Society of America #10Erasing the Justice Society

In the continuity of DC’s relaunches, Superman will reportedly be the first super-hero. This implies that the Justice Society will have been wiped from continuity, and that seems to be DC’s current plan. This isn’t… [more]

Anti-DRM imageIssues in Digital Comics Distribution — and Where We’re Heading

Assuming we recognize the very real and pressing need for a comprehensive digital comics policy, several issues still remain that must be solved, before we can envision what such a policy would look like.

digital comicOn Digital Comics Distribution

We all know it’s the future. We all know we’re behind the gun. Playing catch up. And scared. But we’ve been here before.

Static Shock #1 (2011)The Diversity of DC’s Relaunch, by the Numbers

Since DC has publicly stated that its line-wide relaunch is partially to increase the diversity of its line, it’s worth asking how the relaunched titles stack up in this regard, including some hard quantitative analysis… [more]

Thor movie posterThor as Camp

Thor is a glitzy, glossy summer movie. It’s also high camp in the traditional sense: super-serious and apparently blissfully unaware of how utterly ridiculous it is on every level. It may take itself more seriously… [more]

Swamp Thing #1 (2011)A Closer Look at DC’s Line-Wide Relaunch: Non-Super-Hero Offerings

Beyond its super-hero offerings, DC’s relaunch includes its “dark” magic titles, which incorporates some Vertigo characters into the DCU, and also a few non-super-hero, non-supernatural titles. How do these stack up, as part of an… [more]

Aquaman #1 (2011)A Closer Look at DC’s Line-Wide Relaunch: The Rest of the Super-Heroes

In addition to its more obvious “big guns,” DC’s relaunch includes a bunch of other super-hero offerings, including a promising new Aquaman series, new WildStorm-based titles such as Stormwatch, and many more. We’ll examine each here.

Action Comics #1 (2011)A Closer Look at DC’s Line-Wide Relaunch: The Big Guns

Unless you’re hiding under a rock, you’ve heard that DC is relaunching its entire super-hero line, including venerable mainstays like Action Comics and Detective Comics, in the wake of the company’s Flashpoint crossover.

Batgirl #1 (2011)“Fixing” Barbara Gordon’s Legs: The Politics of Retconning a Disability

What does it mean when you take the most successful disabled character in comics and reverse her disability?

Art Spiegelman's RawOn the Anthology Format

Tim Callahan’s recent “When Worlds Collide” column has me thinking about anthologies.

Teenagers from the Future: Essays on the Legion of Super-HeroesHow I Learned to Love the Legion

This is a few days old, but Timothy Callahan opens his most recent column, “When Worlds Collide” over at CBR, with a reference to me. Which puts me one step closer to world domination.

From Batman #676Deconstructing “Batman R.I.P.”

There’s a lot of controversy surrounding Grant Morrison’s Batman run. To detractors, it’s just unreadable. This often goes along with ugly comments about Morrison in general: that he’s admitted to being inspired by drugs and that… [more]

Civil WarIn Defense of Lateness

There’s been a lot of commotion in recent years over late — sometimes very late — high-profile books.

from Superman Returns Prequel #3, page 15Superman Returns Prequel #3: Lex Luthor

How did Lex meet that girl Kitty anyway? Or that widow Gertrude? And what exactly was he up to for five years?

Superman Returns Prequel #2 page 9Superman Returns Prequel #2: Ma Kent

Previously, I introduced the Superman Returns prequel comics and examined the first issue in some detail, paying particular attention to how it changed things from Donner’s 1978 original. This time, we’ll continue on to the second… [more]

from Superman Returns Prequel #1, page 12The Superman Returns Prequel Comics

In a major coup for the publisher, DC Comics announced in early 2006 that it would, in June 2006, be publishing a four-issue mini-series prequel to the then-upcoming Superman Returns.

Superman ReturnsWhat Bryan Singer Has Done

What Bryan Singer has done, with Superman Returns, is to create something lastingly sublime.

Firestorm #20 (Feb 2006)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Firestorm in Space

Besides being featured on a few pages in Infinite Crisis, Donna’s group starred in five issues once they took off into space on New Cronus.

Infinite_Crisis_Special_-_Rann_Thanagar_WarYour Guide to Infinite Crisis: The Rann / Thanagar War Special

Over the past months, we’ve examined a hell of a lot of Infinite Crisis. In the process, this study has come to exceed 160,000 words! In fact, our coverage of the Rann-Thanagar War alone runs 40,000 words… [more]

Hawkman #49 (Apr 2006)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Coalition in Crisis”

With Hawkman #46, which ended with Hawkman and Hawkgirl contacted by Adam Strange, the Hawks’ narrative met up with that of The Rann Thanagar War (a mini-series that had already concluded at that point). The following three… [more]

JSA Classified #1 alternate cover by Adam Hughes, sans titles and indicia.Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “PowerTrip”

We’ve previously examined the convoluted history of Power Girl. We now turn to Geoff Johns’s revamping of Power Girl’s origin in the pages of JSA Classified, which in turn led directly into Power Girl’s appearance in Infinite… [more]

Power Girl's breasts are used as plot device... again.Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Power Girl

Power Girl, one of the major players in Infinite Crisis, was one of several characters whose history became convoluted in the wake of Crisis on Infinite Earths.

comics_diamond_comic_distributors_incDefending Diamond

Diamond Comics Distributors is an easy target, but it’s not really a fair one. Preface The company’s exclusive rights to distribute DC and Marvel to comic book stores effectively forces all comic book stores to… [more]

The cover to Hawkman #46, sans title and indicia.Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Hawkman #46

Having just concluded a two-part look at Hawkman’s history, including the storyline ending in Hawkman #45, the last issue before the title began to be affected by Infinite Crisis, we now turn to Hawkman #46, which ties into The… [more]

Hawkman #1 (May 2002)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Hawkman, Part 2

Having previously examined the history of Hawkman from his Golden Age origins through the new Hawkgirl’s debut in JSA, we now conclude our look at Hawkman, terminating just before The Rann-Thanagar War.

Shadow War of Hawkman #1 (May 1985)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Hawkman

Given Hawkman’s role in The Rann-Thanagar War, it’s useful to briefly consider Hawkman’s history and his ties to Thanagar.

Teen Titans #22Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Dr. Light in Teen Titans

Identity Crisis left Dr. Light remembering what he was once capable of and thinking how next to act. In the wake of that mini-series, DC sought to turn Dr. Light into a major villain

Adam Strange #8 (June 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Adam Strange: Planet Heist” Concludes

Having examined the history of Adam Strange and the first half of his 2004-2005 mini-series, we now turn to the second half of that series, which leads into The Rann-Thanagar War.

Adam Strange #2 (Dec 2004)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Adam Strange: Planet Heist”

We’ve previously covered the history of Adam Strange, up until the 2004-2005 mini-series Adam Strange, which led into The Rann-Thanagar War. Now, it’s time to address that mini-series…

Showcase #17 (Nov-Dec 1958)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Adam Strange

It’s hard to claim that Adam Strange has a particularly glorious history, but he remains one of the DC’s most beloved science fiction characters.

Wonder Woman #221 (Nov 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Tie-Ins to The OMAC Project #6

We’ve already seen that, chronologically, Superman #220 occurs during The OMAC Project #6. But a number of other comics also tied into The OMAC Project #6.

Rann-Thanagar War #5Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The Rann-Thanagar War Concludes

Earlier, we looked at The Rann-Thanagar War #1-4. We now return to that series to cover its conclusion.

Adventures of Superman #644Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Crisis of Conscience” Epilogue

Adventures of Superman #644 offers an epilogue to “Crisis of Conscience,” which also ties to other narrative threads and leads into Infinite Crisis #1.

Liberality for All #1Mike Mackey on Liberality for All

Mike Mackey is the creator of Liberality for All, the first issue of which recently saw publication from ACC Studios. Billed as “the World’s First Conservative Comic Book,” the series takes place 20 years after 9/11.… [more]

JLA #116Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Crisis of Conscience”

“Crisis of Conscience,” running in JLA from #115 to #119, was promoted as bridging the gap between Identity Crisis and Infinite Crisis.

Wonder Woman #220 (Oct 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Sacrifice” Aftermath

In the month after the historic “Sacrifice” storyline, three of the four titles that participated in that storyline offered stories dealing with the aftermath of “Sacrifice.”

OMAC Project #4 (Sept 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The OMAC Project Concludes

The OMAC Project #3 ended with Maxwell Lord surprisingly speaking to a seemingly hypnotized Superman. “Sacrifice,” which that issue noted would continue directly from OMAC #3,

Adventures of Superman #636 (Mar 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Identity Crisis Epilogue

Having mentioned how well Rucka foreshadowed Wonder Woman’s murder of Maxwell Lord, it’s worth looking at exactly how Rucka accomplished this in the pages of Adventures of Superman.

Wonder Woman #219 (Sept 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Sacrifice” Concludes

It’s time to update our look at “Sacrifice,” the storyline that spun out of The OMAC Project. Specifically, it’s time to look at the end of that storyline…

Rann-Thanagar War #1Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The Rann-Thanagar War

The final of the four “Countdown to Infinite Crisis” mini-series to be published, The Rann-Thanagar War is certainly not the weakest and is just as certainly the most sweeping.

Adventures of Superman #642 (Sept 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Sacrifice”

We’ve looked at the first three issues of The OMAC Project. Now it’s time to look at the shocking storyline those three issues flowed into: “Sacrifice,” running through an entire month’s Superman and Wonder Woman… [more]

OMAC Project #1 (June 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The OMAC Project

Having examined DC Countdown, let’s turn our attention to the four mini-series it spawned, beginning with the one that most directly springs from DC Countdown‘s narrative: Greg Rucka’s The OMAC Project.

The DC spinOn DC’s New Logo

On 8 May 2005, DC Comics unveiled its new logo — the first in 30 years or so. What’s in a logo? Does it matter?

Mark Trail (misplaced word balloons example 2)Tensions Between Text and Image

The medium variously known as comic books, graphic novels, bandes-dessinés, manga, manga, sequential art, and sequart has been defined as the juxtaposition of text and image on the static page. Once can here recall Words… [more]

Dr. Manhattan thinking on MarsWatchmen and Intertextuality: How Watchmen Interrogates the Comics Tradition

Today, Watchmen is celebrated as an autonomous work — and it is partly on this basis that its greatness rests.

In the Shadow of No TowersOn In the Shadow of No Towers

In 2004, coinciding with the Presidential elections, Art Spiegelman released In the Shadow of No Towers. It was the first time his work had penetrated the bookstore since his Maus, which had since won a… [more]

Jean Grey confronts Cyclops and Emma FrostConfessions of a New X-Men Reader

Grant Morrison made me care about the X-Men for the first time. Oh, I’d read the X-Men.  I liked the ideas behind “Days of Future Past” and “The Dark Phoenix Saga.”  I just didn’t care.

Identity Crisis #7In Defense of Sue Dibny’s Rape

Call me a sick fuck, but I’m in favor of Sue Dibny’s rape. Wait. That came out wrong. I’m in favor of its use in Identity Crisis.

Jerry Siegel and Joseph ShusterSuperman’s Copyright: The Never-Ending Battle?

With the current focus on the rights to Superman, it’s worth taking a moment to discuss the history of the Superman copyright.

Mark Millar's WantedThe State of American Comics Address, 2004

This is the fourth annual State of American Comics Address that I have given. The State of American Comics Address is intended to sum up, in retrospect and for the historical record, the American comics… [more]

Amazing Spider-Man #1Reviews out of Time 3: Amazing Spider-Man #1

Greetings, True Believers! Welcome to the third installment of my continuing attempt to enlighten you about the weird comics I’m discovering down at Clark’s Drugs! And man, have I got a weird one for you… [more]

Bill JemasBill Jemas Autopsy

Bill Jemas was for a few years the man everyone loved to hate. He played the bad guy to Joe Quesada, who more effectively cultivated himself as the “people’s man” in Marvel Comics’ administration. Now… [more]

Wolverine looking tough on the cover of New X-Men #115Why I Hate Wolverine

Wolverine would have been a good recurring character in The Incredible Hulk, where he first appeared. And I would have defended him, retractable claws and all. But he can’t really sustain his own book, nor being… [more]

Alan Moore's Swamp ThingAttention Versus Quality (or Fuck the Market)

People love to complain about it. I can’t enter a comic shop without hearing it. Everyone in American comics seems to want another boom — as if the last one was good for us.

Real-world preemption in Authority #13.Mark Millar’s The Authority and the Polemic over Iraq

For some reason, as I think of the polemic over Iraq (as I often do these days), I keep thinking about The Authority.

Bendis and Maleev's Daredevil #26The State of American Comics Address, 2003

Things are, in many ways, quite good in American comics. Sales stink, but the quality of the average comic book is really rather high.

Flash #1 (June 1987)Memoir in Ben-Day Dots

I can’t recall the first comic I ever read. I’m sure they featured in my early childhood, as my family has tattered old Donald Duck and other Gladstone comics to prove it.

Captain America #5 (Oct 2002)The Intellectual Rip-Off of Captain America’s The New Deal

There has been some discussion, as of late, of the politics of recent Captain America storylines.

Superman #75 (Jan 1993)Against Speculators

Comics in the early ’90s were full of collectors, people who bought comics not to read them but to collect them. And comic book companies catered to this market, printing multiple covers, foil-enhanced covers, holographic… [more]

Zero Hour timelineOn Continuity: No-Prizes, Retcons, and the Mental Acrobatics of Continuity Repair

In the Golden Age of the 1930s and 1940s, comics were mostly episodic tales in which characters barely changed.

The Authority Vol. 1 #13 pageExposing Status Quo Super-Heroics in Mark Millar’s The Authority

In 2000, a largely unknown writer named Mark Millar took over an already revolutionary title called The Authority, published by DC / WildStorm.

Legion of Super-Pets imageThe Genius of the Super-Pets

The creation of derivative versions of super-heroes goes back to Captain Marvel’s derivatives, Mary Marvel and Captain Marvel, Jr. — which were introduced in the 1940s.

Rich JohnstonRich Johnston on Comics Gossip

Rich Johnston is the sole relevant gossip columnist for an entire artistic industry in America. Sometimes scandalous, his columns have broken major stories and changed the face of comics historicism,

Joe QuesadaMedia Coverage of Comic Books: The Case of 60 Minutes II

Tonight, I watched 60 Minutes II because I read online that Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada, popular hero for returning (or contributing to the return of) Marvel Comics to greatness (or something closer), would be on the… [more]

Tales of Suspense #39Reviews out of Time 2: The X-Men #1, Tales of Suspense #39, and Sgt. Fury #1

I’m told that there’s been a lot of e-mail in response to the last column, and what’s apparently called “printouts” of it has been sent to me, since I don’t do e-mail myself.

Incredible Hulk #1Reviews out of Time 1: Fantastic Four #1, The Incredible Hulk #1, and Amazing Fantasy #15

Guys, I’d like to tell you that there’s some good stuff going on over at this company called Marvel Comics! They got this guy Stan Lee writing, and he’s doing some weird stuff.

Alan MooreThe Cult of the Writer

One of the major phenomena occurring in American comic books in the last two decades has been the cult of the writer, often in competition with the cult of the artist or illustrator. Various years… [more]

Superman symbolSuperman 2002

Metropolis. A group of walking citizens suddenly stops on the street and stares hopefully toward the heavens.

Sandman #23 (Feb 1991)A Brief Consideration of Gaiman’s Usage of Lucifer in The Sandman

Before he had his own ongoing series, Lucifer came to prominence in Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman. But Gaiman’s Lucifer went through three very different depictions, somewhat inconsistent with one another.

Stan LeeAgainst Silver Age Marvel, the Cult of Stan Lee, and Fantastic Four (Annual) #1 / For Comic Books as Literary Art

To this day, one hears otherwise intelligent comic book creators saying that they want to recapture the joy of reading Fantastic Four #1, of its fun and its newness. This always shocks me, especially when it… [more]

Superman the Movie (1978)Comic Book Morality

It’s true: there’s a simplicity to seeing Doc Doom or Lex Luthor as bad and Superman or the Fantastic Four as good.

authority24originalCensorship of The Authority

The 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks upon the United States of America left many Americans, and much of the world, seriously shaken and disturbed. Almost immediately, the shockwaves echoed throughout the artistic world:

100 BulletsThe State of American Comics Address, 2002

The American comic book industry, as an economic institution, is doing terribly. Artistically, however, this will be remembered as a fairly good period. Many mainstream titles are selling less than 20,000 copies; a few even… [more]

Vampirella Model Search SpecialThe State of American Comics Address, 2001

Okay, ground rules: I take it for granted that comics — or, rather, the medium of graphic literature (an important distinction) — is a serious artistic form, obviously under-appreciated by comparison to painting, sculpture, and… [more]

Hellblazer #72 (Dec 1993)Belfast and New York, Ireland and America, and “Irish Studies” as Reflected by Garth Ennis

Garth Ennis, an Irish writer working in the graphic novel (or extended comic book) format, represents a literary outsider. Although he shows considerably greater disdain for many other groups, Ennis has openly shown disdain for… [more]

The most recent issue of The Authority, issue #14.Mark Millar on The Authority

The Authority, already popular, has taken off under the new team of Mark Millar and Frank Quitely. Though many doubted they could replace their popular predecessors,

NEWS CONTENT BY JULIAN DARIUS (77 TOTAL)

Will Eisner Week 2014It’s Will Eisner Week!

This week is the sixth annual Will Eisner Week, in which the Will and Ann Eisner Family Foundation helps organize events promoting the late and legendary comics creator, as well as the comics medium and free… [more]

Sequart logoSequart Gets a New Logo

Today, Sequart gets a new logo. The new logo is very close to our previous logo, and retains the same large, light blue “S.” The text on top of it, however, is very different. The… [more]

tumbler golf cartBatman’s Tumbler Available in a Golf Cart Version

Just in time for the Christmas buying season, a golf cart version of Batman’s Tumbler has been put up on eBay. Unfortunately for holiday shoppers, the cart was purchased today, just after midnight, once word… [more]

Oldboy (2013) posterIt’s Manga Week on Sequart!

In celebration of this week’s release of Spike Lee’s Oldboy, a remake of the 2003 South Korean film, in turn based on the Japanese manga, we’re running manga-related posts all this week on Sequart. Manga’s… [more]

Voyage in Noise: Warren Ellis and the Demise of Western CivilizationOn Voyage in Noise: Warren Ellis and the Demise of Western Civilization

I don’t remember which Warren Ellis comic was my first. I certainly read his Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight issue, but I doubt it put the name Warren Ellis into my still-young brain. I… [more]

The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and DaredevilThe Devil is in the Details in Comics Stores Today

The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and Daredevil, edited by Ryan K. Lindsay, is available for sale in comics specialty stores today. For half a century, Daredevil has been an outsider and… [more]

Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston's THE FILTH in the 21st CenturyCuring the Postmodern Blues in Comics Stores Today

Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth, by Tom Shapira, is available for sale in comics specialty stores today. Published in 2002-2003, Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth is disgusting,… [more]

Sequart logoSequart Turns 17

Today, Sequart celebrates its 17th birthday. Thank you to everyone who has made this possible — from our contributors to our readers, from the comics professionals who have embraced our projects to the fans who… [more]

Animal Man Vol. 1 #1The Complete Story of Animal Man

As the Continuity Pages continue to grow, the pages for Animal Man have been completed, comprising a guided tour of all 125 Animal Man-centric issues that DC has ever published, along with every collected edition.… [more]

Sequart logoThe Continuity Pages Return

The Continuity Pages is a massive project that seeks to organize comics according to continuity, rather than simply by title and number. This especially has advantages in the current era, with its plethora of mini-series,… [more]

Man of SteelIt’s Superman Week at Sequart!

With Man of Steel debuting later this week, Sequart is proud to announce Superman Week, debuting tomorrow — Monday, 10 June. Superman Week is our third themed week, following on the success of last month’s Star… [more]

The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and DaredevilTwo Reviews of The Devil is in the Details

Two reviews of Sequart’s The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and Daredevil describe the volume’s strengths and weaknesses. A review by Gereg Jones Muller calls the book “fascinating” and contains this passage:… [more]

The Weirdest Sci-Fi Comic Ever Made: Understanding Jack Kirby's 2001: A Space OdysseyOn The Weirdest Sci-Fi Comic Ever Made, the Book on Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey

It’s been a pleasure to write about Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey here at Sequart, especially as part of its Sci-Fi Week event. It’s also my pleasure to announce that all of this material is… [more]

Star Trek Into DarknessIt’s Star Trek Week and Sci-Fi Week at Sequart!

With Star Trek into Darkness debuting later this week, Sequart is proud to feature two back-to-back weeks of themed content: Star Trek Week and Sci-Fi Week. Beginning tomorrow (Monday, 13 May), we’ll begin a week… [more]

Iron Man 3 posterIron Man 3 — Second Biggest Opening in History

It’s official: Iron Man 3‘s opening weekend in the United States is the second biggest in history, after only The Avengers. Iron Man 3 took in an estimated $175.3 million in its opening weekend, which… [more]

The Devil is in the DetailsTwo Sequart Books in Previews

The Devil is in the Details and Curing the Postmodern Blues are now available to order through your local comic-book shop. Both books are in the current, May 2013 Previews catalog, for distribution to comic-book… [more]

Free Comic Book DayToday is Free Comic Book Day!

Today is the 12th annual Free Comic Book Day, in which comic-book fans — and prospective comic book fans — can go to their local comic-book store and receive free comic books.

Grant Morrison: The Early YearsOn Sequart’s Grant Morrison Library (Video)

In which I discuss Sequart’s three books on Grant Morrison’s work: Timothy Callahan’s Grant Morrison: The Early Years, Patrick Meaney’s Our Sentence is Up: Seeing Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles, and Tom Shapira’s just-released Curing the… [more]

The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and DaredevilOn Sequart’s New Daredevil Book (Video)

In which I discuss Sequart’s most recent publication, The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and Daredevil, edited by Ryan K. Lindsay, and my own essay in the volume (which is titled “What… [more]

The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and DaredevilSequart Releases The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and Daredevil

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization is proud to release The Devil is in the Details: Examining Matt Murdock and Daredevil, edited by Ryan K. Lindsay. For half a century, Daredevil has been an outsider and… [more]

Blind Dates and Broken HeartsBlind Dates and Broken Hearts: Sequart’s Fourth Single

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization is proud to release its fourth single (or short, standalone book): Blind Dates and Broken Hearts: The Tragic Loves of Matthew Murdock, by Ryan K. Lindsay. Daredevil is perhaps the… [more]

Curing the Postmodern BluesSequart Releases Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth in the 21st Century

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization is proud to release Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth in the 21st Century, authored by Tom Shapira. Published in 2002-2003, Grant Morrison and… [more]

Grant Morrison and Karen Berger, circa 1989Karen Berger to Leave DC

After a long career that included creating and helming DC’s Vertigo imprint since its inception, Karen Berger is departing DC Comics. In an industry where few editors are known to readers and fans, Karen Berger… [more]

Not the Israel My Parents Promised MeSequart Sponsors Tufts University Live Chat with Artist JT Waldman

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization is proud to sponsor a free live online chat with JT Waldman, collaborator with Harvey Pekar on the graphic novel Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me.

Sequart for mobileSequart for Mobile

If you browse the web on your smartphone, Sequart.org now has a mobile-optimized version of the site.

Christian Bale's camouflage TumblerA Brief Report from Comic-Con — with Movie Batmobiles

Here at Comic-Con, our Image Revolution panel seemed to go over well, and thanks to everyone who attended. Special thanks to Marc Silvestri, who was on the panel, for his tremendous support. Top Cow even included… [more]

San Diego Comic-Con 2012The Image Revolution at Comic-Con

If you’re going to be at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con, be sure to stop by our panel about The Image Revolution, our forthcoming documentary film about Image Comics. On the panel will be director and… [more]

Grant Morrison: The Early YearsTwo Books About Grant Morrison Now on Kindle

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization’s celebrated Grant Morrison: The Early Years and Our Sentence is Up: Seeing Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles are both now available on Kindle.

Improving the Foundations: Batman Begins from Comics to ScreenGet Sequart’s Book on Batman Begins for 99 Cents

Sequart’s Improving the Foundations: Batman Begins from Comics to Screen, by Julian Darius, is now available digitally for 99 cents.

Keeping the World Strange (revised first edition)Sequart’s Books Get New, Cheaper Editions

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization’s entire line of eight books of comics scholarship is now available in revised editions featuring significantly lower cover prices.

Chris ClaremontNew Documentary Film: Comics in Focus: Chris Claremont’s X-Men

Sequart and Respect Films are proud to announce a new documentary film, the first in a new series that will take advantage of new forms of distribution. A Kickstarter campaign has been created to help… [more]

Gotham City 14 Miles: 14 Essays on Why the 1960s Batman TV Series MattersJim Beard Signing Gotham City 14 Miles in Ohio and New Jersey

Jim Beard, editor of and essayist for our Gotham City 14 Miles, will be appearing at two upcoming comic shows to promote the book and celebrate 45 years of the 1966-68 Batman TV series.

Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts thumbnailWarren Ellis: Captured Ghosts Postcards

Promotional postcards have been created for the upcoming theatrical debut of Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts, and we thought we’d share them with you. The front features a distorted image of Warren Ellis, along with the… [more]

Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary GuideKeeping the World Strange in Comics Stores Wednesday

Keeping the World Strange, our book on Warren Ellis and John Cassaday’s Planetary, hits comics stores Wednesday (14 September 2011).

iPad / iBooksSequart’s Books Go Digital

As part of Sequart’s roll-out into digital distribution, two of its books are now available digitally: Timothy Callahan’s Grant Morrison: The Early Years and Julian Darius’s Improving the Foundations: Batman Begins from Comics to Screen.

Related Recap, the podcast at Comic RelatedSequart’s Julian Darius and Kevin Thurman on Comic Related

Comic Related, an impressive website with comics news and a full slate of podcasts, interviewed Sequart’s publisher Julian Darius and marketing director Kevin Thurman for its most recent episode of The Related Recap.

Diagram for Deliquents Promo CardPlease Help Diagram for Delinquents, the Documentary Film on Fredric Wertham

We’re in the home stretch on our Kickstarter campaign for Diagram for Delinquents: Fredric Wertham and the Evolution of Comic Books, our upcoming documentary film about the most hated man in comics history: psychiatrist Fredric… [more]

Warren Ellis: Captured GhostsWarren Ellis: Captured Ghosts on Kickstarter

Respect! Films has released a brand new trailer (over at Wired.com) for the documentary film Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts and is looking for some finishing costs funding via Kickstarter.

Voyage in Noise: Warren Ellis and the Demise of Western CivilizationCover Released for Voyage in Noise

We’re pleased to release the cover art for Voyage in Noise:  Warren Ellis and the Demise of Western Civilization, scheduled for a late 2011 release.

Chicago Comics & Entertainment Expo (C2E2)Sequart at C2E2

If you’re going to be at C2E2 in Chicago on Saturday, 19 March, come check out Sequart’s “Year of Ellis” panel.

Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary GuideKeeping the World Strange in Previews

Keeping the World Strange:  A Planetary Guide, Sequart’s newest book, is now available for order through Diamond Comics Distributors.

Diagram for Deliquents Promo CardDiagram for Delinquents, the Documentary Film on Fredric Wertham

Sequart is proud to announce a documentary film about the most hated man in comics history: psychiatrist Fredric Wertham.

Shot in the Face: A Savage Journey to the Heart of TransmetropolitanCover Released for Shot in the Face

We’re pleased to release the cover art for Shot in the Face:  A Savage Journey to the Heart of Transmetropolitan, scheduled for a late 2011 release.

Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary GuideCover Released for Keeping the World Strange

We’re pleased to release the cover art for Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary Guide, scheduled for May 2011 release.

Warren Ellis2011: The Year of Ellis

Here at Sequart, 2011 is the Year of Ellis — as in celebrated comics writer Warren Ellis. Throughout the year, we’ll be offering three books and a documentary film on Ellis, exploring his major works, his… [more]

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationWelcome to the New Sequart!

You may have noticed that, as of a few days ago, our site has been redesigned, including the addition of a couple of new books. Now, we’re rolling out new online content for the first… [more]

Grant Morrison: Talking with GodsSite Back Up (in Stripped-Down Form)

After a long delay, Sequart.org has returned in a stripped-down form focusing on our line of books and movies, including the upcoming documentary Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods. We’re sorry that our archives, including thousands… [more]

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationSequart.org Down

Sequart.org has experienced a loss of service due to a server-related issue. Our webhost migrated the site from one server to another, and it turned out that the complex site simply didn’t work on the… [more]

Teenagers from the Future: Essays on the Legion of Super-HeroesTeenagers from the Future Now Available

Teenagers from the Future: Essays on the Legion of Super-Heroes is now available from Sequart Research & Literacy Organization.

PreacherOn the Demise of HBO’s Preacher

The live-action HBO series adapting Preacher is apparently dead.

Mutant Cinema: The X-Men Trilogy from Comics to ScreenMutant Cinema Now Available

Mutant Cinema: The X-Men Trilogy from Comics to Screen is now available from Sequart Research & Literacy Organization.

Newsarama logoGrant Morrison: The Early Years on Newsarama

Newsarama has an interview up with Tim Callahan about the second edition of Grant Morrison: The Early Years. Callahan talks about Morrison, including his recent Batman work. He also talks about Sequart’s Teenagers from the Future: Essays… [more]

Dark Knight posterThe Dark Knight Approaches $400 Million

In its third weekend of release, The Dark Knight took in an estimated $43.8 million, bringing its total domestic gross to an estimated $394.9 million. The total was the second-best third-weekend in history: Spider-Man took in $45.0… [more]

The Dark Knight posterThe Dark Knight Approaches $300 Million in 10 Days

Now in its second weekend, The Dark Knight continues to set records for the highest-grossing film over such a short duration. On Monday, 21 July, on its fourth day of release, The Dark Knight all but matched… [more]

The Dark Knight posterThe Dark Knight Breaks Records

The Dark Knight‘s debut in theatres has broken just about all the records for an opening. First, it broke the record for highest-grossing midnight showing on Friday, 18 July. The movie took in $18.5 million… [more]

Grant Morrison: The Early YearsSupport Grant Morrison: The Early Years 2nd Edition

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization is proud to annouce that the second edition of Grant Morrison: The Early Years is now available for order only through comic shops. The book is listed in July’s Previews catalogue, which… [more]

Grant Morrison: The Early YearsGrant Morrison: The Early Years in Previews

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization is proud to annouce that the second edition of Grant Morrison: The Early Years is now available for order only through comic shops.

Teenagers from the Future: Essays on the Legion of Super-HeroesSequart at NYCC

Sequart Research & Literacy Organization will be at the New York Comic-Con, 18-20 April 2008, at the Jacob Javits Center in NYC. Check it out at table #2445.

Mutant Cinema (revised second edition)Mutant Cinema Coming Soon

Sequart’s newest book, Thomas J. McLean’s Mutant Cinema: The X-Men Trilogy from Comics to Screen, has gone to press and will be available for purchase soon. The book examines the X-Men film trilogy from the ground… [more]

Strangle/SwitchLast Chance to Support Kevin Colden

Sequart’s house artist and Xeric award winner Kevin Colden needs your help before the end of February. Kevin is a great guy who has produced our books’ covers as well as Todt Hill over at The Chemistry… [more]

Strangle/SwitchKevin Colden’s Strangle/Switch at Zuda Comics

Sequart’s own house artist, Kevin Colden, has an online comic at Zuda Comics that needs your support. Zuda Comics, as you may know, is DC’s online imprint that carries only new content. Kevin Colden’s comic,… [more]

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationNew Look

Yes, the organization has a new logo… and the site a new look.

Flash and Green Lantern (Alex Ross art)Flash and Green Lantern Films Get Directors

Flash and Green Lantern movies have been given directors and new directions in the wake of the upcoming Justice League film. While work continues on Justice League, set to spin off a number of DC characters into… [more]

Mark MillarMillar Not to Write Next Superman Film

Seeing opportunity in the wake of changes to the next Superman film, Mark Millar offered to write the character’s next cinematic installment… for free. Millar, a longstanding Superman fan, made the offer on Monday in… [more]

Hugh Jackman as WolverineWolverine Film Gets Date

The upcoming Wolverine film, from 20th Century Fox, now has an official title and release date. The scheduled release date is 1 May 2009. This falls on the first official weekend of summer. As for… [more]

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationSequart.com: A 10-Year Retrospective

Earlier this week, I authored an item about how Sequart is celebrating its ten-year anniversary. I want to use this space to expand on what I said there, giving a fuller accounting of our history.

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationSequart.com: 10 Years!

Today, Sequart is celebrating 10 years online.

111604_jlaclassified01DC Plans Justice League Classified

Grant Morrison’s long-awaited return to JLA will come as an arc in Justice League Classified, a new title. The book will feature rotating arcs, much like JLA, but these arcs will take place during various… [more]

Adventures_of_Superman_630Shipping Wednesday, 21 July 2004

The following comics are scheduled to ship this Wednesday, 21 July 2004.Shipping details come courtesy of Diamond Comic Distributors. This list is subject to change. PREVIEWS PUBLICATIONS JUN040005 PREVIEWS ADULT VOL XIV #8 PI JUN040001… [more]

Sequart Research & Literacy OrganizationWhy Sequart.com?

I’ve been writing about comics since the early days of the internet revolution in the mid-1990s. I had read comics forever, and the internet provided an opportunity to make public my examinations of the best… [more]

2953592-astonishing-x-men-1-100kAll the News of February

ApologiaThe Comics Blotter has been absent for a month while I worked on other projects. As such, we are coving the last month of news, with new stories given some preference in our line-up. A… [more]

421421-BatmanOutsiders8Quesada Redesigning Daredevil? — and Other News

Quesada’s Daredevil Redesign Joe Quesada’s return to Daredevil is producing a lot of press. The Marvel Editor-in-Chief has apparently been planning to return to drawing for some time, but wanted to wait until the project… [more]

Mark Millar's Spider-ManMarvel’s April, American Flagg!, and More Cancellations

Marvel’s New SolicitationsApril looks like Marvel’s month (Jim Lee’s debut on Superman notwithstanding). Major projects or launches include the following: The debut of Mark Millar’s Spider-Man, an ongoing through Marvel Knights. Millar’s plans for the… [more]

wizard-logoOn the DC / Humanoids Deal, Cancelled Marvel, and Online Comics News

The Comics Blotter now returns after a hiatus caused by the fact that I’m busy working on a Ph.D., working on the Continuity Pages and this site’s chronologies, and writing my own work, not to… [more]

Action Comics #810Superman Plans, Bill Jemas Dismantled, Secret War, and More

Superman Plans AnnouncedSome of this is old news, but it bears being lumped together. December issues of the Superman titles will see the end of the present creative teams. Action Comics #810 — scheduled for… [more]

Batman_620_coverNew Batman Team, DC Sellouts, and More

First off, I want to thank comixpedia.com and addblog.com for covering the creation of this news column. The previous week included a bit of older information because it was the first installment. Expect more timeliness… [more]

new x-menSequart.com News

The biggest news to report is, of course, this column. Why’s it here? Well, Sequart.com has become a major comics site. And, really, it needs some news. I fucking hate news. I’m focused — and… [more]

STATISTICS FOR JULIAN DARIUS

Total Words for All Magazine Content: 971,885