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Grant Morrison

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“Bog Off Back to Mars”: Shameless? Part 30

Continued from last week. It’s not that Big Dave is without its pleasures, although the vast majority of them are to be found in Steve Parkhouse’s boisterously dynamic artwork. Though even he couldn’t compensate for the… [more]

“A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic”: Shameless? Part 29

Continued from last week. Given the evidence, it would be hard to argue that much of Millar’s work for 2000AD wasn’t worryingly homophobic. The best that might be said of a number of his scripts is… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #12

Captain Comet has invaded Superman’s mind and created a false history that secretly reveals Clark’s desires (and also what most fans would probably want from the hero). Ma and Pa Kent wave their son goodbye… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #11

The construction motif returns on page one of this issue as Metalek attacks Metropolis and destroys a tenement building in the process. Metalek is an artificial intelligence that looks like construction equipment and was first… [more]

On Interpreting The Killing Joke’s Ending (and Authorial Intent)

For his podcast Fatman on Batman, Kevin Smith interviewed Grant Morrison, and Grant talked about how Batman kills the Joker at the end of Batman: The Killing Joke. Grant makes a good argument, citing textual… [more]

Curing the Postmodern Blues in Comics Stores Today

Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth, by Tom Shapira, is available for sale in comics specialty stores today. Published in 2002-2003, Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth is disgusting,… [more]

Julian Darius on The Killing Joke

In this video, Julian Darius discusses his theory about what happens at the end of Batman: The Killing Joke. For more on Julian’s theory, check out the Bleeding Cool story on it. And of course, you… [more]

“The Best Thing Since Dark Knight, Possibly Better”: Shameless? Part 23

Continued from last week. Despite years of cold shoulders and rejection letters, Millar’s determination to write for the major players in the American comics industry never seems to have wavered. In particular, he continued to long… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #10

After taking an issue off to visit Earth 23 and President Superman, Morrison returns the narrative back to Maxim Zarov (also known as Nimrod the Hunter) who was last seen killing a T-Rex at the… [more]

“But The Bad People Haven’t Gone Away”: Shameless? Part 22

Continued from last week. The Spider wasn’t the only long-unseen British superhero to be radically reworked by Millar in Vicious Games. He also briefly laid claim to Tri-Man, who’d been a far more conventional example of the… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #9

After completing the first arc on Action Comics, Morrison spends one issue in the alternate universe of Earth-23 where Superman is not only black, but also the President of the United States. President Superman had… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #8

The issue begins inside the bottle city of Metropolis as Lex Luthor explains that he has no desire to be rescued by Superman and then tries rationalizing his alliance with the Collector as a plan… [more]

From The Saviour to Judge Dredd and Zenith: Shameless? Part 17

Continued from last week. For a brief moment in early 1990, Millar’s career appeared to be unambiguously prospering. As of May, Trident had, in addition to The Saviour, added Millar’s The Shadowmen to their schedule. Though… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #7

After a two issue break, Superman is back to battle the Collector of Worlds and save Metropolis. Strapping an oxygen tank to his back, Superman is going to leap into space to reach the Collector… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #6

The Anti-Superman Army that was teased at the end of the previous issue appears at the beginning of this issue. It appears that the Dealmaker from the first issue (who has popped up a few… [more]

The Last Days of Superman

Superman might be the world’s most popular superhero. He’s also among the most difficult to write. Through the years we’ve seen Superman travel through time, endure the heat of the sun, and perform so many… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #5

Smack in the middle of the first story arc, the narrative shifts to the past for a tale about the rocket that brought baby Kal-El to Earth. Morrison promised in the supplemental material to issue… [more]

Two Sequart Books in Previews

The Devil is in the Details and Curing the Postmodern Blues are now available to order through your local comic-book shop. Both books are in the current, May 2013 Previews catalog, for distribution to comic-book… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #4

While the first three issues of Grant Morrison’s Action Comics could never match up to the perfection of All-Star Superman, the series had established a slow, methodical unveiling of Superman’s mythology in a way that… [more]

1986: The British Invasion, Part 2: Grant Morrison in 1986: Superman & Captain Britain

The last installment examined Grant Morrison’s early, partly comedic Batman prose story, “The Stalking,” which was published in the United Kingdom in 1986. In the 1986 British Superman Annual Grant Morrison did another text story,… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #3

Gene Ha takes over on art duties for the first seven pages of issue #3 in order to show what Krypton was like. The first page of issue #3 depicts Krypton as a colorful utopia… [more]

1986: The British Invasion, Part 1 — Grant Morrison in 1986: Batman

As shown in previous installments, in the mid-1980s there were notable late works by two of the leading members of the founding generation of comic book professionals, Will Eisner and Jack Kirby. This period is… [more]

Patrick Meaney: The Sequart Interview

Patrick Meaney is the author of Our Sentence is Up, as well as essays in several Sequart anthologies and a contributor to Sequart.org. He’s also the director of Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods and Warren… [more]

What Damian Wayne Says about Adult Comic Fans

A few days ago, one of my friends from work was telling me about a particularly attractive girl that he knew from his other job. I know, this isn’t a terribly interesting way to start… [more]

On Warren Ellis’s Super-Hero Work at Avatar

We’ve previously looked at Warren Ellis’s realistic worldview, at his much-celebrated 1999-2003 period, and at his work for Marvel from 2004-2010. One of the more interesting developments of Ellis’s career, especially given his professed distaste… [more]