Sequart Content Tagged:

Grant Morrison

Magazine content related to Grant Morrison (page 1 of 9)

RSS for RSS feed for Grant Morrison

"Morrison & Miller(sic) Move Over To Marvel": The cover to 1995's Comics International #52, with a scan from Alan Davis' Captain Britain tales.“To Shoot Every Last Skrull On Earth”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 41)

Continued from last week. Despite the precipitous collapse and subsequent flatlining of Swamp Thing’s sales in the second half of 1994, Millar’s career at the half-point of the decade still appeared to be in rude… [more]

from Swamp Thing #158, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“So Many Questions are Left Unanswered”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 39

Continued from last week. For the third time in ten months, Millar’s Swamp Thing had presented abortion in a wholly negative light. Nothing that he’d write in the remainder of his tenure on the book… [more]

Article Thumb“A Narrative Structure in Which Despite a Series of Ridiculous Mishaps, All Goes Well”: On Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World #1

Nearly a month ago the Multiversity event kicked off in grand fashion. Not long after that I took a lengthy and in depth look at the first issue. With the release of The Society of… [more]

from Swamp Thing #153, by Millar, Hester et al.“Do You Remember Earth Two or Earth X?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 35

Continued from last week. Though Millar’s River Run tales are rarely anything other than predictable, they’re also undeniably focused, purposeful and enthusiastically told. Even when he’s sketching out the inevitably baleful career of a psychopathic… [more]

The Anatomy of Zur-en-ArrhThe Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh is Available for Order by Comics Shops

Cody Walker’s The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman is now available for order through Diamond Comics Distributors. The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh is listed in the book section of the current Previews catalog. You… [more]

Articlethumb“Nobody Actually Believes This Comic is Haunted or Cursed, Right?”: Multiversity #1 and The Past, Present and Future of Grant Morrison’s Grand Narrative

Whenever one reads a Grant Morrison title one ends up contemplating his other works in varying degrees. His separate tenures on a variety of DC titles, alongside his creator owned titles, and even works for… [more]

from Swamp Thing #158, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Even The Worst Among Them Has Potential”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 32

Continued from last week. So, the Millar who wrote Swamp Thing was enthusiastic, ambitious, and ethically engaged. But for all his efforts and good intentions, and for all the occasional highpoint, the run was heavy-handed,… [more]

03 cas-faceLiving Like a Comic Book: Casanova vol. 1 “Luxuria”

Note: In my previous article on Matt Fraction, Gabriel Ba, and Fabio Moon’s Casanova, I examined the series in its relation to themes present in the fiction of Thomas Pynchon. This next series of articles… [more]

from JLA #8, by Morrison, Porter, Dell.“Ritual Must Be Observed”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 31

Continued from last week. As for his two warring Lodges of super-mages, Millar seems to have used them as a symbol of religious sectarianism and reconciliation. Their differing interpretations of how to save the world… [more]

from Swamp Thing #168, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Why Try to Create a New God?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 30

Continued from last week. But for all the carelessness and clumsiness of Millar’s scripts, his and Morrison’s Swamp Thing consistently displays a deliberate and serious moral purpose. Indeed, the comic persistently plays out two quite… [more]

Don Roberto & El Senor Blake face the supposedly ominous prospect of The Word's intervention; from Swamp Thing #147, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Take a Look Inside My Mind”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 29

Continued from last week. It’s impossible to believe that Morrison and Millar’s Swamp Thing wasn’t intended as an allegory. For all that Morrison’s original plans appear to have been significantly modified by his junior partner,… [more]

How to tell a charming rogue from a complete rotter; from Swamp Thing #169, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Old Souls, Dark Agendas”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 28

Continued from last week. The final pages of Millar’s Swamp Thing depict the Earth on the eve of a historically unprecedented golden age. (*1) Humanity has been empathetically transformed through the god-like Swamp Thing’s influence,… [more]

Seaguy 01Why Aren’t Horror Comics Scary?

Six months out from its announcement at 2014’s Image Expo, we’re still waiting for a solicitation on Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham’s “The Nameless,” a book that I can guarantee you, based on those two… [more]

from Swamp Thing #150 by Millar, Swan, DeMulder et al.“A Martyr for All Mankind”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 24

Continued from last week. At first, Morrison and Millar’s scripts were religious only in the very broadest sense of the term.  With the former’s influence clearly dominant, Swamp Thing’s series-opening crisis of identity is clearly framed… [more]

Superman SingingEverything’s Just Vibrations: A Review of GraphicAudio’s Final Crisis Production

Due to the restrictions of life, I often find myself being unable to read as often as I would like, comics or otherwise. Luckily, audiobooks exist, allowing me to make good use of the time… [more]

from Swamp Thing 165 by Millar, Swan, DeMulder et al“[The] Most Morally Objectionable Comic DC Has Ever Published”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 23

Continued from last week. As ever, it’s impossible to precisely disentangle Morrison’s influence from Millar’s. Yet Swamp Thing’s storylines and themes certainly bear the stamp of many of the former’s recurrent passions; magic and folklore,… [more]

The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s BatmanSequart Releases The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman

Sequart Organization is proud to announce the publication of The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman, by Cody Walker. Grant Morrison has made a career of redefining heroes, but his work with Batman has… [more]

Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 10.32.14 AMGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #21, A Companion Reader

Doom Patrol Vol. 2 #21 “Crawling from the Wreckage, Part 2: Worlds in Collision” Writer – Grant Morrison Art – Richard Case Vertigo/DC Comics April, 1989 As mentioned, this article series will act as an… [more]

from 1990s Firestorm 90, by Ostrander, Mandrake et alKilling the Planet: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 22

Continued from last week. Those first four issues of Swamp Thing by Morrison and Millar set the template for the rest of the series. The pretence of an everything-you-know-is-wrong reboot was swiftly abandoned, and “Alec… [more]

Swamp Thing 140 by Morrison, Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al“Make Him a Monster Again, Make Him Dangerous”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 21

Continued from last week. Morrison later made a point of emphasising how central his contributions to Millar’s Swamp Thing had been; “I worked out a large scale thematic structure based on a journey through the… [more]

From 1994's Swamp Thing #150, by Millar, Hester & DeMulder. Here Millar pointedly has the Traveller described in a way that (1) evokes Barry Allen's defining tardiness while (2) reminding us that the second Flash's funeral took place in the absence of his corpse.Sneaking Barry Allen Back: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 20

Continued from last week. Millar’s habit of writing Swamp Thing tales, which demanded the presence of off-limits DCU characters, never entirely faded. Even at the climax of his run, and despite almost three years of… [more]

New X-Men #132Grant Morrison’s 9/11: New X-Men’s “Ambient Magnetic Fields”

Grant Morrison’s New X-Men debuted in 2001, about five months before 9/11. New X-Men came at an interesting time in American comics history. Marvel was being reinvigorated under Joe Quesada, radically upping its storytelling and… [more]

Black Box, from 1995's Swamp Thing #151, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al“Try Telling That to a 23-Year-Old Who Just Wanted to Play with the Toys”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 19

Continued from last week. That “bloody big shadow” of Alan Moore’s extended far beyond the pages of Swamp Thing. Trying to compete with his achievements on the title was a daunting enough prospect.  But Moore’s… [more]

Frankenstein“Follow me; I seek the everlasting ices of the north…”: DC’s Frankenstein in Post-Millennial Publication, Part Two

We left the last article after establishing various conventions of the Creature and ended on the discussion of a crossover and crisis event. We begin this article with another company-wide crossover and crisis event. To… [more]

Rolling Stone logoGathering Moss: On Rolling Stone’s Top 50 Non-Superhero Graphic Novels

Last week Rolling Stone released its list of “The 50 Best Non-Superhero Graphic Novels.” Writer Joe Gross wrly notes that assembling such a list is tantamount to placing a large target on his back. A… [more]