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Grant Morrison

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titleGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #19, Addendum

Doom Patrol Vol. 2 #19 “Crawling From the Wreckage” Written by Grant Morrison Art by Richard Case Ink by Carlos Garzon Published by Vertigo/DC Comics February, 1989 While reviewing my notes on Doom Patrol #19… [more]

Cover to 1998’s JLA Paradise Lost #3, by Ariel Olivetti“Forgive me, Superman. I’m not very good at losing.” – The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 14

Continued from last week Some in the UK fan community saw Millar as Morrison’s heir apparent on the JLA. But despite later claiming that he’d once turned down the chance to write the Justice League,… [more]

FinalCrisisTwilight of the (New) Gods, Part 1

Introduction “This is the way the world ends…” William Blake. Ever since the moment humanity began to ask about its origins, we also began to wonder about our ultimate end, and what, if anything, comes… [more]

Panel from 1997’s JLA #4, By Morrison, Porter, Dell et al“An Arrogant, Aristocratic Batman?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 13

Continued from last week. But how were Morrison and Millar to explain away the Batman’s aloof and frequently contemptuous attitude towards even his fellow super-heroes? If the Dark Knight was to be cut away from the… [more]

19Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #19, A Companion Reader

Doom Patrol Vol. 2 #19 “Crawling From the Wreckage” Written by Grant Morrison Art by Richard Case Ink by Carlos Garzon Published by Vertigo/DC Comics February, 1989 I’d prefer to state my over-arcing ideas about… [more]

by Millar & Kelly Jones, from 1997’s JLA Secret Files & Origins“This is Not a Dream, but a Plan”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 12

Continued from last week. There are other indications that Millar might have been a major contributor to the new JLA’s origin tale. In the Justice League’s own title, Morrison had scrupulously ensured that his innovations were… [more]

By Morrison, Porter, Dell et al, from 1996/7’s JLA #1The Secret Origin of the JLA, and of “Mark Millar” Too: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 11

Continued from last week. It would be another seven months until Morrison and Millar’s next public collaboration on the Batman. In that time, the new JLA title would establish itself as a remarkably successful reboot. Its… [more]

Morrison TitlesGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol, A Companion Reader

Edgar Allan Poe once parodied the technical processes behind pulpy horror fiction in his obscure essay “How to Write a Blackwood Article” and its inseparable cousin “A Predicament.” Poe criticized the tendency of pen-for-hires to… [more]

Cover from the 2008 Aztek TPB – and before it the comic’s 1st issue in 1996 -  by N Steve Harris & Keith ChampagneThe Batman As Father Figure: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar Part 10

Continued from here. DC’s post-crisis, Dark Age portrayal of the Batman had long been a source of aggravation for both Morrison and Millar. Years before Morrison landed the job of scripting the JLA, the two men… [more]

from 1997’s JLA #9, by Morrison, Oscar Jimenez et al“A Semi-Unhinged, Essentially Humourless Loner Struggling with Rage and Guilt”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 9

Continued from last week. Grant Morrison’s ambition was, it appears, to free the DCU from the constraints of both wonder-killing editorial dictats and the conventions of the Dark Age. Yet unregulated creative anarchy doesn’t seem to… [more]

SSArchetypal Fictional Universes and Hypertexts in Seven Soldiers of Victory

Introduction In his long career, Grant Morrison has written many different types of comics in numerous genres, but he is most known for his work on mainstream superhero titles. This article will attempt to explore… [more]

5The Master Builder: Lego Collides with Animal Man #19

If you haven’t seen The Lego Movie yet, you ought to. I found that the film lived up to its expectations, which included the usual kiddy fanfare. But what I was unable to anticipate was… [more]

From 1997’s JLA Secret Files #1, by Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, Howard Porter et alA Thousand Batmen Blooming: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 8

Continued from last week. The superhero genre had become more and more susceptible to the myth of the definitive version. It was a fan-consuming fallacy which presumed that each character possessed an irreducible core of utterly… [more]

Image Comics logoRevolving Image

At Sydney’s Graphic Festival, held in the iconic Opera House last October, a trio of comic industry greats took to the stage at the invitation of comedian and MC Justin Hamilton. They were the charmingly… [more]

JLAPulling Out of the Dark Age?: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 7

Continued from last week. It’s only to be expected that Millar’s work on the JLA would mesh with Grant Morrison’s agenda. But it is remarkable how closely and effectively Millar’s contributions reflected his friend’s wider ambitions… [more]

by Morrison, Millar, Paul Ryan, John Nyberg et al, from 1997’s The Flash #130“How Can You Possibly Live in a World Without Superheroes?”: The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 6

Continued from last week. Who was responsible for what in Morrison and Millar’s many collaborations? Credit boxes are often little help at all. Stories which carried the Morrison/Millar by-line were on occasion the product of an… [more]

Michel FoucaultThe Foucault Gospel: Grant Morrison, French Philosophy, and One Mangy Coyote

William Shatner has said that one of the secrets to a fulfilling life is learning to say “yes.”  Sure, you sometimes make mistakes, but if you say “yes” enough times you wind up recording albums… [more]

cover to 1998’s Superman Adventures #25, by Rick Burchett, Terry Austin & Marie Severin“Nice to Meet You, Big Guy!”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 5

Continued from last week. Though he’d never again see one of his scripts feature in any of the Batman’s many headlining titles, Millar would return to the character over and over again throughout the Nineties. It’s… [more]

dung“Thus strangely are our souls constructed…”: DC’s Frankenstein in Post-Millennial Publication

Frankenstein (or, rather, Frankenstein’s creature): that oft studied literary figure, that icon of cinematic horror and, upon closer inspection that almost universal and perpetual figure in the comic art. Appearing in various titles from a… [more]

Will EisnerOn Canons, Critics, Consensus, and Comics, Part 3

This week marks the final installment of our search for a comics canon.  As I mentioned in the first column, I recently conducted a survey of the people who contribute to Sequart.  A total of 25… [more]

The Mirror of LoveOn Alan Moore’s “Last” Interview

This post, which was about Alan Moore’s recent interview, has been removed. After its publication, I became aware that what I had written was factually inaccurate. I also became aware that what I had written… [more]

alan-moore-by-frank-quitelyAlan Moore Might be Insane Now

It seems fittingly ironic that Alan Moore announces his exit from the public eye with a 16,000-word harrumph. This interview was a roller coaster of emotions for me – all negative. When I finally finished… [more]

Dark Knight ReturnsOn Canons, Critics, Consensus, and Comics, Part 2

As I explained in last week’s column, I recently asked my fellow Sequart contributors to answer the following question:  “What are the 10 greatest works in the history of the comics medium, and who are the… [more]

Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston's THE FILTH in the 21st CenturyThe Village Voice Names Sequart’s Curing the Postmodern Blues One of the Year’s Best Graphic Novels

Even though Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth in the 21st Century isn’t a graphic novel, the legendary taste-making newspaper The Village Voice named it one of the best… [more]

Moore Vs. MorrisonAlan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 2: Moore Vs. Morrison, Round the 898th

Continued from yesterday. In some cases, Moore’s claims not to have read works which he goes on to criticize might be read as a case of feigned ignorance as a form of politeness. The specific… [more]