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Grant Morrison

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f2Portraits In Alienated British Youth Circa 1989-90, Part Three: Every Day Is Like Sunday

I can’t stand Morrissey, but when I was between the ages of, say, 16 and 19, I thought he was pretty cool—which is precisely what I was supposed to think, given that his music has… [more]

sdfPortraits In Alienated British Youth Circa 1989-90, Part Two: Trident Makes Its Mark—But Ultimately Gets Speared

In August of 1989, a modest little anthology series with some serious “A-list” talent appeared on British comic store shelves and, presumably, at a few newsstands (or newsagents, as they’re called across the pond) as… [more]

All-New Miracleman Annual #1On All-New Miracleman Annual #1

One of the oddities of Marvel finally reprinting Miracleman is the relative lack of interest it’s generated. We’re talking about a work regarded as being as important as Watchmen in super-hero comics history (and arguably even more… [more]

wankerPortraits In Alienated British Youth Circa 1989-90, Part One: Introduction

Maybe it was something in the water—or something in the air—or just something floating around in the larger cultural zeitgeist of the time—but whatever the reason behind it all may have been, from the late… [more]

articlethumb“What Happened To Happy Endings?”: The Multiversity: New Thunderworld Adventures #1

Forgive me if I start by stating the obvious, but there something quite archetypal and mythic about Captain Marvel. Obviously because his powers derive from some pretty mythic figures themselves. Add to this a halcyon… [more]

It's Superman! by Tom De Haven, coverQuintessential Superman: Tom De Haven’s It’s Superman!

A few weeks ago, I wrote a column praising Michael Daugherty’s Metropolis Symphony.  Near the end of that column, I called the Grammy-winning piece one of “the quintessential creative works” about Superman, listing it alongside… [more]

doom patrol 64Tarot, Trans-Gender Robots, and Friendly Bandage-People: The Doom Patrol Interview with Rachel Pollack

Jacurutu Ninety-Nine: The beginning of your run on Doom Patrol coincided with the beginning of the Vertigo line at DC. Grant Morrison left his run with a spectacular ending, but the series was very popular… [more]

DM-_4A Sandman Miscellany: Sandman Overture #4 Review

Written by: Neil Gaiman Art by: J.H. Williams, III Cover by: J.H. Williams, III Dave McKean Variant Cover by: J.H. Williams, III Dave McKean The long awaited Sandman Overture #4 has arrived, just in time… [more]

Absolute WatchmenThe Super-Heroics of Miller and Moore Part 7: Legacy

Alan Moore and Frank Miller’s Impact on Comics Commercially The legacy and influence an artist has on all who follow him/her is always surprising. Some artists take a great work as an inspiration to try… [more]

articlethumb“A Perfectly Finished Work of Art Right Where I Am Sitting Now.”: Cosmic Trigger -The Play

A fair few of you may not have heard of Robert Anton Wilson. This is tragic. A fair few of you may have heard of people influenced by Robert Anton Wilson. This is not so… [more]

coverJorge Borges in Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #22, A Companion Reader

This essay series will devote time and attention to Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol (#19 to #63). Today’s article will cover the strange connection between Jorge Borges and Issue #22. [more]

articlethumb“The Characters Remain Unaware of My Scrutiny, but Their Thoughts are Transparent”: The Multiversity: Pax Americana #1

Whether he explicitly stated it or not Pax Americana is to be Grant Morrison’s Watchmen Redux. Of course it is so much more than this as well. During the initial drafting of this article Pax… [more]

The Multiversity Pax AmericanaGrant Morrison, Watchmen, and the Art of the Polemic

In order to criticize a movie, you have to make another movie. —Jean-Luc Godard A few years ago I stopped reading monthly comic books.  It wasn’t an ideological decision—just a reader’s.  Most of the comics… [more]

from Skrull Kill Krew  #4, by Morrison, Millar, Yeowell & Ivy.“New Paradigms for the Super Hero Team Structure?”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 45)

Continued from last week. No-one could accuse Morrison of being blind to Skrull Kill Krew’s satirical potential. In 1995, he spoke enthusiastically of the book’s capacity to discuss the likes of “catastrophy in the 20th… [more]

from 1995's Skrull Kill Krew #1, by Morrison, Millar, Yeowell, Ivy et al.“Until It Destroys Your Brain”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 44)

Continued from last week. Not everything in Morrison and Millar’s rebuffed pitches to Marvel went to waste. The former’s dogged belief in the quality of the Apocalypse 2099 proposal would have only been strengthened by… [more]

Jubilee & Wolverine, from the highly successful 1992 X-Men cartoon series.“It Would Have Made a Great Comic”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 43)

Continued from last week. Yet whatever its strengths, Morrison and Millar’s 2099 proposal went to waste, with a far less sweeping and less nostalgic series of changes being introduced instead. As part of the ongoing… [more]

GrandpaGohanFindsGokuDBZEp01Akira Toriyama and the Japanese Superman: Son Goku and Science Fiction

There is a divergence between Eastern and Western fantasy in the modern age that is nascent but hidden beneath cultural barriers. Americans can watch an episode of Dr. Who and enjoy the languishing British empire… [more]

articlethumb“The Greatest and / or Worst Picto-fics of All Time”: The Multiversity: The Just #1

Three issues in and the Multiversity event shows no signs of slowing down or disappointing. One of the added joys of The Just for me personally was seeing more of Ultra Comics and that books… [more]

scan 3“A Fading 2099 Universe”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 42)

Continued from last week. The problem with Skrull Kill Krew obviously wasn’t a lack of ambition on Morrison and Millar’s part. The same was true for several of their other substantial pitches to Marvel during… [more]

articlethumbThe Multiversity Interlude: Whatever Happened to the Supercontext?

“It’s only part of something much better that will be wonderful… To believe that things are going to get better and we will participate in things getting better… Is just us about to become something… [more]

"Morrison & Miller(sic) Move Over To Marvel": The cover to 1995's Comics International #52, with a scan from Alan Davis' Captain Britain tales.“To Shoot Every Last Skrull On Earth”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 41)

Continued from last week. Despite the precipitous collapse and subsequent flatlining of Swamp Thing’s sales in the second half of 1994, Millar’s career at the half-point of the decade still appeared to be in rude… [more]

from Swamp Thing #158, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“So Many Questions are Left Unanswered”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 39

Continued from last week. For the third time in ten months, Millar’s Swamp Thing had presented abortion in a wholly negative light. Nothing that he’d write in the remainder of his tenure on the book… [more]

Article Thumb“A Narrative Structure in Which Despite a Series of Ridiculous Mishaps, All Goes Well”: On Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World #1

Nearly a month ago the Multiversity event kicked off in grand fashion. Not long after that I took a lengthy and in depth look at the first issue. With the release of The Society of… [more]

from Swamp Thing #153, by Millar, Hester et al.“Do You Remember Earth Two or Earth X?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 35

Continued from last week. Though Millar’s River Run tales are rarely anything other than predictable, they’re also undeniably focused, purposeful and enthusiastically told. Even when he’s sketching out the inevitably baleful career of a psychopathic… [more]

The Anatomy of Zur-en-ArrhThe Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh is Available for Order by Comics Shops

Cody Walker’s The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman is now available for order through Diamond Comics Distributors. The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh is listed in the book section of the current Previews catalog. You… [more]