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Grant Morrison

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Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #19, A Companion Reader

The first four issues of Grant Morrison’s run of Doom Patrol are rife with allusions to popular culture and the fine arts bound by a love of opposites. [more]

“This is Not a Dream, but a Plan”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 12

Continued from last week. There are other indications that Millar might have been a major contributor to the new JLA’s origin tale. In the Justice League’s own title, Morrison had scrupulously ensured that his innovations were… [more]

The Secret Origin of the JLA, and of “Mark Millar” Too: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 11

Continued from last week. It would be another seven months until Morrison and Millar’s next public collaboration on the Batman. In that time, the new JLA title would establish itself as a remarkably successful reboot. Its… [more]

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol, A Companion Reader

This essay series will examine intertexual themes in Grant Morrison’s first four issues of Doom Patrol (#19 to #22). [more]

The Batman As Father Figure: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar Part 10

Continued from here. DC’s post-crisis, Dark Age portrayal of the Batman had long been a source of aggravation for both Morrison and Millar. Years before Morrison landed the job of scripting the JLA, the two men… [more]

“A Semi-Unhinged, Essentially Humourless Loner Struggling with Rage and Guilt”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 9

Continued from last week. Grant Morrison’s ambition was, it appears, to free the DCU from the constraints of both wonder-killing editorial dictats and the conventions of the Dark Age. Yet unregulated creative anarchy doesn’t seem to… [more]

Archetypal Fictional Universes and Hypertexts in Seven Soldiers of Victory

Introduction In his long career, Grant Morrison has written many different types of comics in numerous genres, but he is most known for his work on mainstream superhero titles. This article will attempt to explore… [more]

The Master Builder: Lego Collides with Animal Man #19

If you haven’t seen The Lego Movie yet, you ought to. I found that the film lived up to its expectations, which included the usual kiddy fanfare. But what I was unable to anticipate was… [more]

A Thousand Batmen Blooming: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 8

Continued from last week. The superhero genre had become more and more susceptible to the myth of the definitive version. It was a fan-consuming fallacy which presumed that each character possessed an irreducible core of utterly… [more]

Revolving Image

At Sydney’s Graphic Festival, held in the iconic Opera House last October, a trio of comic industry greats took to the stage at the invitation of comedian and MC Justin Hamilton. They were the charmingly… [more]

Pulling Out of the Dark Age?: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 7

Continued from last week. It’s only to be expected that Millar’s work on the JLA would mesh with Grant Morrison’s agenda. But it is remarkable how closely and effectively Millar’s contributions reflected his friend’s wider ambitions… [more]

“How Can You Possibly Live in a World Without Superheroes?”: The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 6

Continued from last week. Who was responsible for what in Morrison and Millar’s many collaborations? Credit boxes are often little help at all. Stories which carried the Morrison/Millar by-line were on occasion the product of an… [more]

The Foucault Gospel: Grant Morrison, French Philosophy, and One Mangy Coyote

William Shatner has said that one of the secrets to a fulfilling life is learning to say “yes.”  Sure, you sometimes make mistakes, but if you say “yes” enough times you wind up recording albums… [more]

“Nice to Meet You, Big Guy!”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 5

Continued from last week. Though he’d never again see one of his scripts feature in any of the Batman’s many headlining titles, Millar would return to the character over and over again throughout the Nineties. It’s… [more]

“Thus strangely are our souls constructed…”: DC’s Frankenstein in Post-Millennial Publication, Part One

Frankenstein (or, rather, Frankenstein’s creature): that oft studied literary figure, that icon of cinematic horror and, upon closer inspection that almost universal and perpetual figure in the comic art. Appearing in various titles from a… [more]

On Canons, Critics, Consensus, and Comics, Part 3

This week marks the final installment of our search for a comics canon.  As I mentioned in the first column, I recently conducted a survey of the people who contribute to Sequart.  A total of 25… [more]

On Alan Moore’s “Last” Interview

This post, which was about Alan Moore’s recent interview, has been removed. After its publication, I became aware that what I had written was factually inaccurate. I also became aware that what I had written… [more]

Alan Moore Might be Insane Now

It seems fittingly ironic that Alan Moore announces his exit from the public eye with a 16,000-word harrumph. This interview was a roller coaster of emotions for me – all negative. When I finally finished… [more]

On Canons, Critics, Consensus, and Comics, Part 2

As I explained in last week’s column, I recently asked my fellow Sequart contributors to answer the following question:  “What are the 10 greatest works in the history of the comics medium, and who are the… [more]

The Village Voice Names Sequart’s Curing the Postmodern Blues One of the Year’s Best Graphic Novels

Even though Curing the Postmodern Blues: Reading Grant Morrison and Chris Weston’s The Filth in the 21st Century isn’t a graphic novel, the legendary taste-making newspaper The Village Voice named it one of the best… [more]

Alan Moore and Super-Heroes, Part 2: Moore Vs. Morrison, Round the 898th

Continued from yesterday. In some cases, Moore’s claims not to have read works which he goes on to criticize might be read as a case of feigned ignorance as a form of politeness. The specific… [more]

Original, More Explicit Artwork for The Killing Joke Surfaces

As originally reported by Bleeding Cool, Billy Hynes, a former employee of London’s Gosh Comics, tweeted a photo on Sunday that appeared to be a page of original art from Alan Moore and Brian Bolland’s… [more]

Editing Miracleman: How Marvel Can Do It Right

The long-awaited news has broken, over the weekend, that Marvel plans to finally move forward on its reprinting of Miracleman, beginning with Alan Moore’s issues, moving through Neil Gaiman’s, and culminating by allowing Gaiman and… [more]

“Two Tickets for My Next Performance”: Shameless? Part 32

Continued from last week. So how did Morrison and Millar use the pages of Big Dave to express their contempt for homophobia? Starting from the premise that their readers were similarly liberal-minded, they studded the strip’s… [more]

“We Were Just Trying to Bring Peace to the Planet”: Shameless? Part 31

Continued from last week. The urge to stereotype Millar’s beliefs in the light of his least liberal scripts is an understandable one. Yet his work is anything but consistent on matters of social justice. As I’ve… [more]