Desmond White

When Desmond White is not blogging out of both ends, he’s stunt doubling for a bear or actually doing his job -- teaching literature at a Texas high school. A loose definition of genius, Desmond’s goals in life include making yerba mate sound appetizing (“It’s grass... that you drink!”) and writing about comics. Check out his blog, which is dedicated to bad writing advice for the aspiring bad writer.

TOP MAGAZINE CONTENT BY DESMOND WHITE

metamythAn Unknown Soldier in an Unknown War: Joshua Dysart’s Unknown Soldier

Until 2008, the Unknown Soldier had lived up to his name. Created by Robert Kanigher and Joe Kubert in 1966, the character has been wrapped in mystery for decades, and I’m not referring to his… [more]

OTHER MAGAZINE CONTENT BY DESMOND WHITE (23 TOTAL)

coverMud, Myth, and Metaphor in Matt Phelan’s Storm in the Barn

An exploration of narrative therapy and myth-making in Matt Phelan’s The Storm in the Barn, a beautiful graphic novella about a young boy who’s getting older but not growing up in the terribly bleak conditions of the Dust Bowl. [more]

featuredimageMORAV: The Future of Robot Warfare According to Fon Davis

MORAV is an indie comic (and soon-to-be live-action series) that mashes giant robots with modern warfare to deliver an action-packed but surprisingly deep product. Behind-the-scenes is the behind-the-scenes man himself – Fon Davis, a miniatures designer who has worked on “The Matrix,” “Star Wars,” “Interstellar,” and other monumental films. [more]

Screen Shot 2015-01-11 at 5.01.12 PMHinterkind Volume One Lacks Humanity

The concept of the ruins of the United States devolving into factionalism has been well-explored in other post-apocalyptic literature, but Edington refreshes the idea by incorporating monsters and races one might encounter in a game of Dungeons & Dragons. His human characters, however, leave a lot to be desired. [more]

coverJorge Borges in Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #22, A Companion Reader

This essay series will devote time and attention to Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol (#19 to #63). Today’s article will cover the strange connection between Jorge Borges and Issue #22. [more]

flutter coverSweet Moments, Dark Reveals in Flutter, Volume 1 by Jennie Wood

Flutter focuses on a teenaged loner struggling to discover who she is (or more aptly for a shapeshifter, whom she wants to be). But this isn’t your typical shapeshifter teenage romance — it’s a brilliant panoply of sexual discovery and transformation. [more]

kneelCould Dwayne Johnson’s Black Adam Contribute to Orientalism?

Dwayne Johnson will play DC heavy-hitter Black Adam in an upcoming Shazam film. Fans were either reviled or revitalized, but what has been rarely discussed is how exactly Black Adam should be adapted to the big screen. We just need to be careful. [more]

1c CoolOutsourcing War and Profiteer Heroism in the Jacamons’ Cyclops

The Jacamons’ Cyclops is a science-fiction war thriller about a world where wars are delegated to private mercenary companies and televised for entertainment. Gruesome, amoral, but close to home with the modern reliance on mercenaries, the progress of communication technologies including helmet-cams, and the rising popularity of reality television. [more]

Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 10.32.14 AMGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #21, A Companion Reader

This article series will act as an informal annotated bibliography for Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol, which ran from 1989 to 1993. Have I ever seen an annotated bibliography before? Apparently not. [more]

titleAn Unknown Soldier in an Unknown War: Joshua Dysart’s Unknown Soldier #4

Joshua Dysart explores the “eye-for-an-eye” model often used against violent “terror” groups in Africa and the Middle East in this issue of the Unknown Soldier #4. Also included is an intertextual reading pairing Moses Lwanga with his Biblical counterpart. [more]

Screen Shot 2014-05-28 at 11.25.31 AMTwain and Tesla Versus Evil: A Review of The Five Fists of Science

A steampunk graphic novel starring the bromance between Mark Twain and Nikola Tesla as they create giant robots and battle Cthulu cults. [more]

faceLife Behind the Visor: Tracking Cyclops through the X-Men Films

What happened to Cyclops? It’s a question that’s been burning inside me since the ludicrously terrible “X-Men: The Last Stand.” Finally, “Days of Future Past” provides some answers. [more]

kabelRaised by Raptors #1: Dynamite but Dino-Lite

“Raised by Raptors” #1, written by Oliver Sykes, the lead singer of metal band Bring Me the Horizon, is a strange pairing between dinosaurs and the Aztecs. Somewhat verbose and light on the action (and dinosaurs), I felt this dinodystopia left a lot to be desired. [more]

objectivistSpider-Man Shrugged: The Lack of Randian Heroes in The Amazing Spider-Man

A cursory exploration of “The Amazing Spider-Man” #1-#38 and its tangible threads to Steve Ditko’s known ardent Objectivism, a philosophy of self-interest developed by Ayn Rand. [more]

codGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #20, A Companion Reader

This article series will act as an informal annotated bibliography for Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol, which ran from 1989 to 1993. Have I ever seen an annotated bibliography before? Apparently not. [more]

120Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #19, Addendum

Doom Patrol Vol. 2 #19 “Crawling From the Wreckage” Writer – Grant Morrison Art – Richard Case Ink – Carlos Garzon Vertigo/DC Comics February, 1989 While reviewing my notes on Doom Patrol #19 in preparation… [more]

negative manGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol #19, A Companion Reader

Doom Patrol Vol. 2 #19 “Crawling From the Wreckage” Writer – Grant Morrison Art – Richard Case Ink – Carlos Garzon Vertigo/DC Comics February, 1989 I’d prefer to state my over-arcing ideas about Morrison’s Doom… [more]

Morrison TitlesGrant Morrison’s Doom Patrol, A Companion Reader

The intention of this essay series will be to devote time and attention to Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol run, from #19 to #63. [more]

rainMaking Love the Will Eisner Way: Intercourse Discourse in A Contract with God

In a 2013 interview, former DC president, author, and comics historian Paul Levitz posed the question “why was Contract with God important? It was an early graphic novel, but not the first – there are… [more]

black adamBlack Adam, Orientalism, and The Marvel Family #1

Black Adam is a focal point of American fears about the Oriental Other. This shouldn’t be the only interpretation, nor do I want to poison anyone’s enjoyment of the character, but nonetheless Black Adam frequently supports American exceptionalism and Middle Eastern inferiority. [more]

coverAn Unknown Soldier in an Unknown War: Joshua Dysart’s Unknown Soldier Issue #3

Unknown Soldier #3 Writer – Joshua Dysart Art – Alberto Ponticelli Cover – Igor Kordey Vertigo/DC Comics February, 2009 Here’s the deal Dysart presents in Unknown Soldier #3. If the Lord’s Resistance Army can successfully… [more]

titleAn Unknown Soldier in an Unknown War: Joshua Dysart’s Unknown Soldier Issue #2

Unknown Soldier #2 Writer – Joshua Dysart Art – Alberto Ponticelli Vertigo/DC Comics January, 2009 Or maybe this is an African story after all. At least, Afrocentric. In the last article I wanted to hit… [more]

openingAn Unknown Soldier in an Unknown War: Joshua Dysart’s Unknown Soldier Issue #1

Unknown Soldier #1 Writer – Joshua Dysart Art – Alberto Ponticelli Vertigo/DC Comics December, 2008 Although the principal backdrop is Acholiland, a subregion of Northern Uganda, the Unknown Soldier is not an African story. Instead,… [more]

assimilation 3Political Heroes in Assimilation: Dissecting the Star Trek / Doctor Who Crossover

Should the hero remain an outsider to corrupted society, or should he actively recover that society from within? Political heroism explored in the Star Trek / Doctor Who crossover “Assimilation” (2012). [more]

STATISTICS FOR DESMOND WHITE

Total Words for All Magazine Content: 46,357