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Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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Miracleman, Chapter 7: “Blue Murder”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit.” We now continue our examination with chapter seven of this celebrated but long-unavailable series,… [more]

Meet the Magus, Part 6: A World Inside, Outside in Alan Moore and Oscar Zarate’s A Small Killing

Three years before Alan Moore announced his decision to become a magician and roughly four years before the performance event of The Birth Caul, he collaborated with Oscar Zarate on an unusual graphic novel.

On Paul Chadwick’s Concrete: Complete Short Stories 1986-1989

Becoming a monster’s not all bad, or so Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko assured us.

The Road to Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins

We’ve previously examined the road to Christopher Nolan taking over the Batman film franchise, from Batman and Robin through Frank Miller’s “Year One” screenplay. This installment concludes the story, taking us up to Batman Begins.… [more]

Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man, Part 3

Lately I’ve been writing about comic books mostly from a mythological sort of angle, either as they pertain to mythological symbolism or how they can be used as real-life lessons the same way a myth… [more]

Grant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: Fantastic Four: 1234

Fantastic Four: 1234 was written at the tail end of Morrison’s Day-Glo Years, during his brief period writing for Marvel in the early 2000s.

“Swamped”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #22

Saga of the Swamp Thing #22: “Swamped” Cover date: March 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Steve Bissette and John Totleben. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: Todd Klein. Cover: Tom Yeates. Editor: Len Wein.

A Peek Behind the Curtain: Into North Korea with Guy Delisle in Pyongyang

Guy Delisle’s travelogue, Pyongyang, takes readers on a journey to a country that has been closed off to the West for years, and instead of dispelling fears of a fascist nation oppressing its people in… [more]

Meet the Magus, Part 5: Microcosm, Macrocosm, and Magic in V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta may well be Alan Moore’s most politically concerned work, and its sci-fi dystopian vision has a decidedly practical edge.

On DC Comics Presents #50, by Mishkin, Cohn, Swan, and Shaffenberger (1982)

Nothing ever ages worse than a typical product of the moment just before a paradigm shift.

Frank Miller’s Year One Screenplay

Late 2000 seems, by all accounts, to have been a turning point for the languishing Batman franchise. It was then that both Batman: DarKnight and the live-action Batman Beyond were cancelled, with Warner Bros. focusing… [more]

Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man, Part 2

In the summer of 2011, Spider-Man died.

Grant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: The Mystery Play

The Mystery Play is another short-form Morrison work from the “adult comics” era of the early ’90s.

“The Anatomy Lesson”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #21

Saga of the Swamp Thing #21: “The Anatomy Lesson” Cover date: February 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Steve Bissette and John Totleben (co-penciled by Rick Veitch). Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. Cover: Tom Yeates.… [more]

On Jeff Hawke: Overlord, by Sydney Jordan and Willie Patterson (1960)

“Adult” all too often has a different meaning now. But in the very best sense of the term, Jordan and Patterson’s Jeff Hawke was a newspaper science-fiction comic strip for adults.

Unproduced Attempts to Film Batman’s Origins

Batman Begins was, in fact, preceded by other attempts to dramatize Batman’s origins, both on film and on television. In 1999, one production company proposed a weekly series about the boyhood of Bruce Wayne prior… [more]

Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man, Part 1

I don’t like to address politics very often when I write about comics.

Comics as Catharsis: Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home

Comic literature is truly an exciting field, as it expands its canon to include more than the super-hero genre that got things started in the 1930s and ’40s.

Meet the Magus, Part 4: Phantasmagoria and the Occult in Saga of the Swamp Thing

The most pertinent question to ask of ourselves at the outset of discussing fictional works by Moore that deal in some way with magic or even the occult is “what is the difference between a… [more]

On Hawkworld, by Timothy Truman and Alcatena (1989)

In the shadows of the planet Thanagar’s great High Towers, where the three billion souls of the Empire’s alien underclass are segregated away in the most squalid and soul-butchering of conditions, there’s a statue of… [more]

Warren Ellis and the Fantastic Four

Warren Ellis hates super-heroes. At least, that’s what people say. He certainly has played his part, through a few off-the-cuff remarks, in this misconception. But it would be more accurate to say that Ellis hates… [more]

Grant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: St. Swithin’s Day

During the early ’90s, Grant Morrison was wrapping up his acclaimed runs on Doom Patrol and Animal Man and moving away from mainstream super-heroics.

“Loose Ends”: Alan Moore’s First Issue of Swamp Thing

Saga of the Swamp Thing #20: “Loose Ends” Cover date: Jan 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Penciler: Dan Day. Inker: John Totleben. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. Cover: Tom Yeates. Editor: Len Wein.

On Joe Simon and Jack Kirby’s Captain America (1941)

1-2-3-4! Joe Simon and Jack Kirby’s “The Case of the Hollow Men” is punk super-heroics.

The Fever of Urbicande, Chapter 4 Concludes

We’ve previously looked at The Fever of Urbicande‘s prologue (and some of its implications), as well as chapters one, two, three (in two parts), and most of four (parts one, two, and three). We now conclude our… [more]