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Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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Morrison-HeroesGrant Morrison’s All-Star Superman: Science Fiction or Science Fiction Appropriated?

Like traditional literature, graphic novels and comics approach the science fiction genre in a variety of different ways, and this should come as no surprise given the various approaches to sequential art in the United… [more]

CoverOn Alan Moore’s WildC.A.T.s

Alan Moore doesn’t even slum it like the rest of us do.

From Miracleman, chapter 4, page 2 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 4: “Dragons”

Having introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, and third chapters, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit,” we now turn to chapter four of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, in which the hero has his… [more]

Daredevil_crossThe Adaptation of Daredevil into Film, Part 2

As described briefly in the previous article, Frank Miller had chosen to recreate Daredevil as a gritty, crime-film-influenced narrative.

CoverOn the Sgt. Rock Story “Head Count,” by Robert Kanigher and Joe Kubert

Camus defined a rebel as a man who says no, and that’s exactly what Warrant Sergeant Hugh Thompson was on Saturday, 16 March 1968, when his helicopter flew over the Vietnamese village of My Lai.

From "The Yesterday Gambit," page 9“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 4

We’ve introduced Alan Moore’s Miracleman interlude from Warrior #4, “The Yesterday Gambit,” and examined its first, second, and third segments. We now turn to its final segment, illustrated by Steve Dillon, in which Miracleman and Warpsmith return… [more]

Daredevil One sheetThe Adaptation of Daredevil into Film, Part 1

In any comic book adaptation, there are people who will criticize the film’s translation from the original comic book.

batman05_coverHow Digital Comics Change How We Read Comics

An early warning, I’m going to be talking about Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s Batman #5 in this article and I will be spoiling some of what it does.

CoverOn Eloise de Montgri, by Hermann

Please do be aware: spoilers.

From "The Yesterday Gambit," page 6“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 3

We’ve introduced Alan Moore’s Miracleman interlude from Warrior #4, “The Yesterday Gambit,” and examined its first and second segments. We now turn to its third segment, illustrated by Alan Davis, in which Miracleman and Warpsmith revisit… [more]

justiceleague4intA “Redundant” Justice League: An Analysis of DC’s New 52 in Light of Umberto Eco’s Theory of Narrative Redundancy

It can be argued that Justice League, the flagship title of DC’s “New 52,” is predominantly a narrative of images.

bode headThe Evolving Symmetry of Locke and Key

If there is one thing just brutally asymmetrical to the series Locke and Key is how overwhelmingly overlooked it is.

Good_LifeOn Seth’s It’s a Good Life, if You Don’t Weaken

Please be warned: spoilers ahoy!

from "The Yesterday Gambit," page 5“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 2

We’ve introduced Alan Moore’s Miracleman interlude from Warrior #4, “The Yesterday Gambit”, and examined its first segment. We now turn to its second segment, illustrated by Paul Neary, in which Miracleman and Warpsmith revisit the 1963… [more]

DodolaHabibi: Open Dialogues with Difficult Literature

My first impression upon picking up my copy of Craig Thompson’s latest work, Habibi, was one of both excitement and trepidation.

Damian defiantDeconstructing Batman and Robin: Damian’s Transformation (Part 3)

While Damian’s name can be interpreted as “to tame,” it can also be interpreted as “to conquer,” which seems to be Talia’s reasoning for his name when she says in issue #7, “Damian will stride… [more]

Howard The Duck #24On Steve Gerber and Gene Colan’s Howard the Duck Story, “The Night After You Save the Universe?”

Violence is generally presented as a solution to problems in comics, because, being the illustrated form they are, they tend to over-simply, reduce everything to its most basic.

from "The Yesterday Gambit," page 1“The Yesterday Gambit,” Part 1

We began discussion of “The Yesterday Gambit” last time, having previously introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, and third chapters. We now turn to the story of Alan Moore’s “The Yesterday Gambit,” from Warrior #4.

mag_amazingworld3Consumption Junction

Human activity is not entirely reducible to processes of production and conservation, and consumption must be divided into two distinct parts. The first reducible part is represented by the use of the minimum necessary for… [more]

Damian neckDeconstructing Batman and Robin: Damian’s Transformation (Part 2)

While Dick Grayson’s growth as Batman is certainly one way of interpreting Batman and Robin, one shouldn’t forget the “Robin” part of the title.

OceansideOn Mister Wonderful, by Daniel Clowes

Please be warned; this second Valentine’s Day piece contains very significant spoilers!

Warrior #4 (Summer 1982)“The Yesterday Gambit” (A Miracleman Interlude)

We’ve introduced Miracleman and discussed its first, second, and third chapters. We now turn to the famous “The Yesterday Gambit,” from Warrior #4.

Screen shot 2012-01-11 at 7.07.40 PMRealism and the Art of Action

Sequential art is a purely visual medium, one that relies on the combination of words and pictures in order to give the illusion of animation and sound.

Steve CanyonMeeting with Bosses Old and New

[Marshall] Field asked, “What do you want?” [Milton] Caniff didn’t even have to hesitate. “I told him full ownership [of Steve Canyon] and full editorial control.” – “Setting the Stage,” by Chris Jenson in Steve… [more]

Damian revealedDeconstructing Batman and Robin: Damian’s Transformation (Part 1)

The very idea of Batman having a son was criticized before Damian ever made his first appearance.