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Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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JSA Classified #1 alternate cover by Adam Hughes, sans titles and indicia.Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “PowerTrip”

We’ve previously examined the convoluted history of Power Girl. We now turn to Geoff Johns’s revamping of Power Girl’s origin in the pages of JSA Classified, which in turn led directly into Power Girl’s appearance in Infinite… [more]

Power Girl's breasts are used as plot device... again.Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Power Girl

Power Girl, one of the major players in Infinite Crisis, was one of several characters whose history became convoluted in the wake of Crisis on Infinite Earths.

The cover to Hawkman #46, sans title and indicia.Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Hawkman #46

Having just concluded a two-part look at Hawkman’s history, including the storyline ending in Hawkman #45, the last issue before the title began to be affected by Infinite Crisis, we now turn to Hawkman #46, which ties into The… [more]

Hawkman #1 (May 2002)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Hawkman, Part 2

Having previously examined the history of Hawkman from his Golden Age origins through the new Hawkgirl’s debut in JSA, we now conclude our look at Hawkman, terminating just before The Rann-Thanagar War.

Shadow War of Hawkman #1 (May 1985)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Hawkman

Given Hawkman’s role in The Rann-Thanagar War, it’s useful to briefly consider Hawkman’s history and his ties to Thanagar.

Teen Titans #22Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Dr. Light in Teen Titans

Identity Crisis left Dr. Light remembering what he was once capable of and thinking how next to act. In the wake of that mini-series, DC sought to turn Dr. Light into a major villain

Adam Strange #8 (June 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Adam Strange: Planet Heist” Concludes

Having examined the history of Adam Strange and the first half of his 2004-2005 mini-series, we now turn to the second half of that series, which leads into The Rann-Thanagar War.

Akira (Dark Horse version), vol. 1An Introduction to Akira

Akira is seen by the manga/anime community as the “beginner’s manga/anime.” That is to say, if you like this series, you’ll probably like manga/anime, and vice versa. While this is may seem derogative of Katsuhiro Otomo’s… [more]

Adam Strange #2 (Dec 2004)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Adam Strange: Planet Heist”

We’ve previously covered the history of Adam Strange, up until the 2004-2005 mini-series Adam Strange, which led into The Rann-Thanagar War. Now, it’s time to address that mini-series…

Showcase #17 (Nov-Dec 1958)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: A Brief History of Adam Strange

It’s hard to claim that Adam Strange has a particularly glorious history, but he remains one of the DC’s most beloved science fiction characters.

Wonder Woman #221 (Nov 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Tie-Ins to The OMAC Project #6

We’ve already seen that, chronologically, Superman #220 occurs during The OMAC Project #6. But a number of other comics also tied into The OMAC Project #6.

Rann-Thanagar War #5Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The Rann-Thanagar War Concludes

Earlier, we looked at The Rann-Thanagar War #1-4. We now return to that series to cover its conclusion.

Adventures of Superman #644Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Crisis of Conscience” Epilogue

Adventures of Superman #644 offers an epilogue to “Crisis of Conscience,” which also ties to other narrative threads and leads into Infinite Crisis #1.

JLA #116Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Crisis of Conscience”

“Crisis of Conscience,” running in JLA from #115 to #119, was promoted as bridging the gap between Identity Crisis and Infinite Crisis.

Action Comics #1Modernism and the Birth of the American Super-Hero

The idea of the modern American super-hero is an abstract and nebulous concept.

Wonder Woman #220 (Oct 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Sacrifice” Aftermath

In the month after the historic “Sacrifice” storyline, three of the four titles that participated in that storyline offered stories dealing with the aftermath of “Sacrifice.”

OMAC Project #4 (Sept 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The OMAC Project Concludes

The OMAC Project #3 ended with Maxwell Lord surprisingly speaking to a seemingly hypnotized Superman. “Sacrifice,” which that issue noted would continue directly from OMAC #3,

Adventures of Superman #636 (Mar 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: Identity Crisis Epilogue

Having mentioned how well Rucka foreshadowed Wonder Woman’s murder of Maxwell Lord, it’s worth looking at exactly how Rucka accomplished this in the pages of Adventures of Superman.

Wonder Woman #219 (Sept 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Sacrifice” Concludes

It’s time to update our look at “Sacrifice,” the storyline that spun out of The OMAC Project. Specifically, it’s time to look at the end of that storyline…

Ultraverse image 5Ultraverse Ten Years Later

The fairly recent announcement of a Prime feature film led me to dust off my collection of Ultraverse comics.

Rann-Thanagar War #1Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The Rann-Thanagar War

The final of the four “Countdown to Infinite Crisis” mini-series to be published, The Rann-Thanagar War is certainly not the weakest and is just as certainly the most sweeping.

Adventures of Superman #642 (Sept 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: “Sacrifice”

We’ve looked at the first three issues of The OMAC Project. Now it’s time to look at the shocking storyline those three issues flowed into: “Sacrifice,” running through an entire month’s Superman and Wonder Woman… [more]

OMAC Project #1 (June 2005)Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: The OMAC Project

Having examined DC Countdown, let’s turn our attention to the four mini-series it spawned, beginning with the one that most directly springs from DC Countdown‘s narrative: Greg Rucka’s The OMAC Project.

DC Countdown #1Your Guide to Infinite Crisis: DC Countdown

We’re now in the third month after DC Countdown, and it’s time to review the various top-selling mini-series and other events counting down to Infinite Crisis…

The DC spinOn DC’s New Logo

On 8 May 2005, DC Comics unveiled its new logo — the first in 30 years or so. What’s in a logo? Does it matter?