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Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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X-Men 01X-Men #1-19 by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, et al (1963-66), Part 1

In a profoundly reactionary society, even a gentle and sincere challenge to the status quo can be read as a significant marker of dissent.

The Weird #2On The Weird, by Jim Starlin and Bernie Wrightson

The 1988 four-issue mini-series The Weird — written by Jim Starlin, with art by legendary comics artist Bernie Wrightson and inks by Dan Green — isn’t told from the Justice League’s point of view. Rather,… [more]

Image Founders 2007Sharpening the Image: Introduction

Comic readers from Gen X and (older members of) Gen Y remember 1992 as a sort of zeitgeist for comics.  Change was in the air in all strata of the field

24c“Roots”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #24

Saga of the Swamp Thing #24: “Roots” Cover date: May 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Steve Bissette and John Totleben. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. Cover: Tom Yeates. Editor: Len Wein.

Tales to Astonish #35The Adventures of Henry Pym (1962 to 1965)

Don’t print the legend. There was no such thing as an archetypal “Marvel superhero” for the first few years following the publication and unexpected success in 1961 of the Fantastic Four. What would in hindsight… [more]

JLA: Earth 2On JLA: Earth 2, by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely

Like many classic comics from the 1980s onward, JLA: Earth 2 (the 1999 original graphic novel written by Grant Morrison with art by Frank Quitely) plays with comics history in a postmodern way, offering new… [more]

Flex DeluxeGrant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: Flex Mentallo, Part 1

The Invisibles is Grant Morrison’s definitive work about our world, the nexus of his philosophical worldview, simultaneously the source and culmination of his ideas about our universe. But there is another world, the super-hero world

Kingdom Come SupermanOn Kingdom Come, by Mark Waid and Alex Ross

1996’s Kingdom Come — a self-contained, fully-painted series by writer Mark Waid and artist Alex Ross — was first published as a four-issue, prestige-format mini-series, designated as an Elseworlds (i.e. out-of-continuity) tale.  The story was… [more]

The Killing Joke 7Meet the Magus, Part 7: Dualism and the Dark Side in Batman: The Killing Joke

For fans, many of the works that Alan Moore produced for DC carry the shadow of later acrimony between the author and publisher

Avengers 001On Iron Man in 1963, by Stan Lee, Don Heck, and Jack Kirby

Why should we care about Tony Stark? More importantly, why should we pity him?

Miracleman, chapter 7, bottom of page 7 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 7 Concludes

We’ve begun discussing chapter seven (parts one, two, and three) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we conclude our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and… [more]

The Sun's "Gotcha" headlineMiracleman, Chapter 7, and British Politics

We’ve begun discussing chapter seven (in two parts) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six,… [more]

Swamp_Thing_Vol_2_23“Another Green World”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #23

Saga of the Swamp Thing #23: ”Another Green World” Cover date: April 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Steve Bissette and John Totleben. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. Cover: Tom Yeates. Editor: Len Wein.

Batman 10On the Batman of Three Worlds, by Bill Finger and Sheldon Moldoff (1963)

It’s not so long ago that the very idea would have sounded thoroughly absurd. Yet, the Batman tales of the late ’50s and early ’60s by editor Jack Schiff, writer Bill Finger, and penciler Sheldon… [more]

from Miracleman, chapter 7, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 7: The Mike / Liz / Miracleman Love Triangle

We’ve begun discussing chapter seven of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six, plus the… [more]

Miracleman, chapter 7, top of page 2 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 7: “Blue Murder”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, and six, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit.” We now continue our examination with chapter seven of this celebrated but long-unavailable series,… [more]

image 1Meet the Magus, Part 6: A World Inside, Outside in Alan Moore and Oscar Zarate’s A Small Killing

Three years before Alan Moore announced his decision to become a magician and roughly four years before the performance event of The Birth Caul, he collaborated with Oscar Zarate on an unusual graphic novel.

Concrete 1On Paul Chadwick’s Concrete: Complete Short Stories 1986-1989

Becoming a monster’s not all bad, or so Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko assured us.

Christopher Nolan publicity stillThe Road to Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins

We’ve previously examined the road to Christopher Nolan taking over the Batman film franchise, from Batman and Robin through Frank Miller’s “Year One” screenplay. This installment concludes the story, taking us up to Batman Begins.… [more]

SpiderMen_1_Cover_660Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man, Part 3

Lately I’ve been writing about comic books mostly from a mythological sort of angle, either as they pertain to mythological symbolism or how they can be used as real-life lessons the same way a myth… [more]

Fantastic Four 1Grant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: Fantastic Four: 1234

Fantastic Four: 1234 was written at the tail end of Morrison’s Day-Glo Years, during his brief period writing for Marvel in the early 2000s.

22b“Swamped”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #22

Saga of the Swamp Thing #22: “Swamped” Cover date: March 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Steve Bissette and John Totleben. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: Todd Klein. Cover: Tom Yeates. Editor: Len Wein.

Pyongyang CoverA Peek Behind the Curtain: Into North Korea with Guy Delisle in Pyongyang

Guy Delisle’s travelogue, Pyongyang, takes readers on a journey to a country that has been closed off to the West for years, and instead of dispelling fears of a fascist nation oppressing its people in… [more]

Image 1Meet the Magus, Part 5: Microcosm, Macrocosm, and Magic in V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta may well be Alan Moore’s most politically concerned work, and its sci-fi dystopian vision has a decidedly practical edge.

5 vestOn DC Comics Presents #50, by Mishkin, Cohn, Swan, and Shaffenberger (1982)

Nothing ever ages worse than a typical product of the moment just before a paradigm shift.