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Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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from Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 6 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8 Concludes

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, three, four, and five) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we conclude our exploration of that chapter.

greear-1Superheroes Emerge in the Face of Sandy

The obvious choice for me this week, in my unending and inane quest to compare everything that happens in my life or in my brain to something I’ve seen happen in a comic, would be… [more]

Ultimate_Iron_Man_Vol_1_2Superhero Versus Superzero

Imagine being back in elementary school, wearing a well-loved shirt with a classic 1940-esque Batman symbol.

2344962-227445_180498_superman__batman_superBromancing: the Extracurricular Partnership and Relationship of Batman and Superman

The last son of Krypton is alone.

ST31b“A Halo of Flies” and “The Brimstone Ballet”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issues #30 and #31

Saga of the Swamp Thing #30 “A Halo of Flies” Cover date: November 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Stephen Bissette and Alfredo Alcala. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. Editor: Karen Berger.

From Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: The Flashback Pages

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, three, and four) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

costume-designs-for-the-first-three-new-52-robinsCritiquing the Robins of the New 52

It’s Saturday, Halloween weekend in New York City, and I’ve elected to stay inside all day and write about super-heroes.

Alfred005Three Surrogate Wise Men: The Father Figures of the Batman

Many of our comic book heroes are orphans.

SpiderspotFall of the Spot; Rise of Coyote

Spot. The Spot.

orionThe Older Generation’s Farewell: The Hunger Dogs (Part 3)

As we have seen, in The Hunger Dogs, the graphic novel in which Jack Kirby resolved his “Fourth World” saga, Kirby’s optimistic vision of the early 1970s turned dark and ominous.

from Miracleman, chapter 8, page 7 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Introducing Big Ben

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, and three) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve also previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well… [more]

Bruce and DamianWho’s Your Daddy: Examining the Parental Relationship Between Bruce and Damian Wayne

Very few of our comic book heroes have real biological families.

SevenSoldiersVictory02Modular Narrative and Seven Soldiers of Victory

As near as I can tell, this is all Grant Morrison’s fault.

ST29a“Love and Death”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #29

Saga of the Swamp Thing #29 “Love and Death” Cover date: October 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Stephen Bissette & John Totleben. Letterer: John Costanza. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Editor: Karen Berger. 

from Miracleman, chapter 8, page 3 (Warrior version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Rocket Launchers, Flamethrowers, and Racism

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one and two) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well as… [more]

from Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 1 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Two Ninja Vs. Superman

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well as the interlude “The… [more]

Four-RobinsOh, Brother, I Hate Your Guts: The Use of the Brother Versus Brother Motif in Comics

Comic books, like all other forms of literary mediums, use a few different literary devices to stimulate our interest.

Miracleman #3Miracleman, Chapter 8: “Out of the Dark”

We’ve previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well as the interlude “The Yesterday Gambit.” We now continue our examination with chapter eight of this celebrated but long-unavailable series, written by Alan Moore and… [more]

Justice League #5 (Sept 1987)On the First Year of Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’ Justice League International (Part 2)

We previously examined the first four issues of Giffen and DeMatteis’ seminal Justice League from 1987-1988. Today, we conclude our examination of that title’s first year, which works as its own unit.

Flex MentalloGrant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: Flex Mentallo, Part 4: “We are All UFOs”

At last, we reach the end of this great four part novel known as Flex Mentallo.

ST28a“The Burial”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issue #28

Saga of the Swamp Thing #28 “The Burial” Cover date: September 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artist: Shawn McManus. Letterer: John Costanza. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Cover: Steve Bissette and John Totleben. Editor: Karen Berger.

Justice League #1 (May 1987)On the First Year of Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’ Justice League International

While Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’s run on Justice League (retitled Justice League International with #7) is fondly remembered, it’s worth looking at how that title’s first year, published from 1987 to 1988, develops and… [more]

Batman: Gotham Knight DVDThoughts on the Animated Batman: Gotham Knight

Since I’ve written about Batman Begins, I thought it might be nice to write about its follow-up. No, not The Dark Knight. Chronologically, Batman Begins is followed by Batman: Gotham Knight, a made-for-video collection of six… [more]

Image (27)-1The Older Generation’s Farewell: The Hunger Dogs (Part 2)

From the start of Jack Kirby’s The Hunger Dogs, a new age had arrived.

Portrait by John CoulthartMeet the Magus 10, The Magus in Time: From Hell Part II

Alan Moore is still better known for his super-hero work than for his esoterically themed or experimental genre-breakers, but this may not always be the case.