Articles

Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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BM.WHCC.DJ.R1Deconstructing Death and Vigilantism: A Dark Knight Eulogy

Death is not welcomed in DC, but occasionally, and fortunately, an opportunity arises to talk about death and its greater significance in the DC timeline.

darkseidlikestowatch-hdBThe Older Generation’s Farewell: The Hunger Dogs (Part 4)

As Jack Kirby’s The Hunger Dogs draws to its close, the arcs of two of its major characters, Orion and Esak, are resolved, as shown in the previous installment.

scan 1On the Profoundly Rational Doctor Stephen Strange (Part 2)

Having found his way to “India, land of mystic entanglement” in the hope of having the “Ancient One” heal his hands, the still entirely cynical Strange discovered that magic really did exist.

Alan Moore's Swamp ThingAlan Moore on the Couch

Previously, we’ve discussed and dismissed the charges that Alan Moore or Grant Morrison ripped off anyone in any serious way. We next discussed the timeline of Grant Morrison’s career, including his hiring at DC. We… [more]

fullarmorjusticeleagueJustice and the Hero: Encountering Archetypical Motives in Justice

There is a growing confusion of what to make of the archetypal Hero / Villain dichotomy in the postmodern world.

STannual-a“Down Amongst the Dead Men”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing Annual #2

Saga of the Swamp Thing Annual #2 “Down Amongst the Dead Men” 1985. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Steve Bissette & John Totleben. Editor: Karen Berger. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza.

scan1On the Profoundly Rational Doctor Stephen Strange

Who’d pitch a character such as Steve Ditko and Stan Lee’s Doctor Strange to one of the Big Two today?

Saga of the Swamp Thing, Book OneThe Moore Narrative of Comics History

Last time, we discussed the anxiety of influence and the silliness of thinking that Moore ripped off Superfolks or that Morrison ripped off Moore. This time, I’d like to look at why these charges persist… [more]

hardboiledEverything’s (Not) Fine, Honey: Finding Identity in Hard Boiled

In dystopian literature things generally go out with a bang, a revolution, a euthanasia, but not so in Hard Boiled.

2176000-picture_23Baby Mama Drama: The Feminist Changes in Talia al Ghul

For years, the character of Talia Al Ghul was essentially Batman’s version of a Bond-girl.

Deadpool_1_CoverDeadpool #1: Escapism for Absurdists

On November 7th, the latest volume in the continuing saga of Marvel’s Merc with the Mouth hit the shelves with “Marvel Now!” Deadpool #1, and the issue is wonderful.

Moore / MorrisonOn the Moore / Morrison Feud, Literary Borrowings, and the Anxiety of Influence

It’s long been no secret, to those who paid attention, that Alan Moore and Grant Morrison — arguably the medium’s two most influential writers — don’t get along. But it’s been a slow simmer of… [more]

973128Augmenting the Reality of Sequential Art

Sometimes I feel the world we live in is a tad boring.

from Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 6 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8 Concludes

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, three, four, and five) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we conclude our exploration of that chapter.

greear-1Superheroes Emerge in the Face of Sandy

The obvious choice for me this week, in my unending and inane quest to compare everything that happens in my life or in my brain to something I’ve seen happen in a comic, would be… [more]

Ultimate_Iron_Man_Vol_1_2Superhero Versus Superzero

Imagine being back in elementary school, wearing a well-loved shirt with a classic 1940-esque Batman symbol.

2344962-227445_180498_superman__batman_superBromancing: the Extracurricular Partnership and Relationship of Batman and Superman

The last son of Krypton is alone.

ST31b“A Halo of Flies” and “The Brimstone Ballet”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, Issues #30 and #31

Saga of the Swamp Thing #30 “A Halo of Flies” Cover date: November 1984. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Stephen Bissette and Alfredo Alcala. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. Editor: Karen Berger.

From Miracleman, Chapter 8, page 4 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: The Flashback Pages

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, three, and four) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

costume-designs-for-the-first-three-new-52-robinsCritiquing the Robins of the New 52

It’s Saturday, Halloween weekend in New York City, and I’ve elected to stay inside all day and write about super-heroes.

Alfred005Three Surrogate Wise Men: The Father Figures of the Batman

Many of our comic book heroes are orphans.

SpiderspotFall of the Spot; Rise of Coyote

Spot. The Spot.

orionThe Older Generation’s Farewell: The Hunger Dogs (Part 3)

As we have seen, in The Hunger Dogs, the graphic novel in which Jack Kirby resolved his “Fourth World” saga, Kirby’s optimistic vision of the early 1970s turned dark and ominous.

from Miracleman, chapter 8, page 7 (Eclipse version)Miracleman, Chapter 8: Introducing Big Ben

We’ve begun discussing chapter eight (parts one, two, and three) of Alan Moore’s Miracleman, illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter. (We’ve also previously introduced Miracleman and discussed chapters one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven, as well… [more]

Bruce and DamianWho’s Your Daddy: Examining the Parental Relationship Between Bruce and Damian Wayne

Very few of our comic book heroes have real biological families.