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Grant Morrison: The Early Years

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Sequart logoSmorgasbord #62: Shawn & Tom Kill the Marvel Universe

Go for broke! The news from the Marvel Retailer Summit have forced Shawn & Tom to discuss at length about all myriad problems Marvel actually have, as opposed to the problems they think they have.… [more]

Sequart logoSmorgasbord #61: Fist of Iron, Feet of Clay

Tom and Shawn call upon their inner chi to give Netflix’s Iron Fist a well-deserved beatdown; Paramount tries to solicit a Pro; Tom discovers that the pratfalls and faux pas of the comics industry don’t… [more]

Sequart logoSmorgasbord #51: Goodbye, Northampton’s Rose

Shawn and Tom consider the legacy of Alan Moore as he prepares to leave comics forever(?); Shawn sings the praises of Outhouser Jude Terror for speaking truth to power; nobody puts Valiant in the corner… [more]

Sequart logoSmorgasbord #34: Cherchez la Femme

Tom and Shawn ring in the new year with movie rumors, a surprise appearance from 2000AD‘s back catalog, and the Angouleme Grand Prix’s questionable grasp of the word “history.” We also review Spider-Man / Deadpool… [more]

The Complete D.R. & Quinch coverThe Complete D.R. & Quinch: Alan Moore’s Sci-Fi Fun Time

Like many readers who discovered the world of comics in bookstores rather than comic shops, the works of Alan Moore made an immediate impression on me. He’s a comic book rock star and, undeniably, one… [more]

sdPortraits In Alienated British Youth Circa 1989-90, Part Six: A “Crisis” Of Faith

The next stop on our tour of British comics focused on disenfranchised teens/twentysomethings in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s brings us to True Faith, a smart, satirical, dare I say sometimes even poignant look… [more]

The Multiversity Pax AmericanaGrant Morrison, Watchmen, and the Art of the Polemic

In order to criticize a movie, you have to make another movie. —Jean-Luc Godard A few years ago I stopped reading monthly comic books.  It wasn’t an ideological decision—just a reader’s.  Most of the comics… [more]

"Morrison & Miller(sic) Move Over To Marvel": The cover to 1995's Comics International #52, with a scan from Alan Davis' Captain Britain tales.“To Shoot Every Last Skrull On Earth”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 41)

Continued from last week. Despite the precipitous collapse and subsequent flatlining of Swamp Thing’s sales in the second half of 1994, Millar’s career at the half-point of the decade still appeared to be in rude… [more]

Zombo CoverPhony Beatlemania: Zombies, Nostalgia, and Satire in Al Ewing and Henry Flint’s Zombo: You Smell of Crime and I’m the Deodorant

One of my favorite moments in Al Ewing and Henry Flint’s 2000 AD serial Zombo takes place when the titular character – a half human / half zombie hybrid created by the British government to… [more]

behind the Simon Davis cover to 1997’s 2000AD 1030 lies Millar’s last published Judge Dredd story“Our ‘War-is-Fun’ Attitude”: Shameless? Part 37

Continued from last week. Hindsight suggests that Canon Fodder marked the beginning of the end of Millar’s relationship with 2000AD. It was by no means the last of his scripts to appear in the comic,… [more]

from Canon Fodder II, by Neil Long/Kew-W & Chris Weston, as reprinted by 2000AD in 2009“Where’s Canon Fodder?”: Shameless? Part 36

Continued from last week. Though pinpointing exactly when Millar stopped working for 2000AD is an difficult business, he’d most definitely moved onto the American market by the time Canon Fodder returned without him in 1996. With the… [more]

from the 2008 reprint of Canon Fodder, by Mark Millar & Chris Weston“Bones Gnawed to the Marrow”: Shameless? Part 33

Continued from last week. “I had no idea what I was doing for the most part and just learning how to do very basic stuff then. Only good stuff I’d recommend would be Big Dave (which… [more]

scan1“Two Tickets for My Next Performance”: Shameless? Part 32

Continued from last week. So how did Morrison and Millar use the pages of Big Dave to express their contempt for homophobia? Starting from the premise that their readers were similarly liberal-minded, they studded the strip’s… [more]

by Steve Parkhouse, Morrison & Millar, from 1993’s 2000AD #845“We Were Just Trying to Bring Peace to the Planet”: Shameless? Part 31

Continued from last week. The urge to stereotype Millar’s beliefs in the light of his least liberal scripts is an understandable one. Yet his work is anything but consistent on matters of social justice. As I’ve… [more]

by Parkhouse, Millar and Morrison, from 1993’S 2000AD 846“Bog Off Back to Mars”: Shameless? Part 30

Continued from last week. It’s not that Big Dave is without its pleasures, although the vast majority of them are to be found in Steve Parkhouse’s boisterously dynamic artwork. Though even he couldn’t compensate for the… [more]

2000AD #843“A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic”: Shameless? Part 29

Continued from last week. Given the evidence, it would be hard to argue that much of Millar’s work for 2000AD wasn’t worryingly homophobic. The best that might be said of a number of his scripts is… [more]

By Millar, Curt Swan, Kim Demulder et al, from Swamp Thing #165.“He’s Camp as Christmas, but He’s Good as Gold”: Shameless? Part 28

Continued from last week. The debate about the attitudes expressed in Millar’s work towards LGBT issues is hardly a new one. Even as early as 1993, Monaghan’s pseudo-interview with Millar and Morrison in Comic World #18… [more]

Art by Casanovas + Jr, from Robo-Hunter: Serial Stunners Part 4 in February 1993’s 2000AD #882.A Safe Pair of Hands?: Shameless? Part 27

Continued from last week. Millar’s longest running assignment at 2000AD had been Robo-Hunter, for which he wrote several hundred pages between 1991 and 1993. (*1) Created by writer John Wagner and artists Jose Ferrer and Ian… [more]

scan1“What’s the Point Chief?”: Shameless? Part 26

Continued from last week. Laughter can be used to reveal prejudice before the mind has the chance to stifle it. But the Millar of the period gave no sign that he disapproved of his own heartless… [more]

Art by Anthony Williams, from Babe Race 2000: chapter 1, from 2000AD #883, 1994“Never Trust A Woman… Women Will Eat You Alive”: Shameless? Part 25

Continued from last week. But Millar’s work for Fleetway often went far beyond casual, unthinking sexism. As the months passed and the examples of this piled up, he gave every impression of being a died-in-the-wool misogynist.… [more]

scan one“Comic Books Most Dripping-Wet Liberal”: Shameless? Part 24

Continued from last week. The image of Millar as a tykish, daring and promising newcomer was wearing through by the end of 1992. What had at first seemed like boyish ambition, conspicuous potential and a novice’s… [more]

scan1“But The Bad People Haven’t Gone Away”: Shameless? Part 22

Continued from last week. The Spider wasn’t the only long-unseen British superhero to be radically reworked by Millar in Vicious Games. He also briefly laid claim to Tri-Man, who’d been a far more conventional example of the… [more]

scan1“Lots of People Dressed Like That in the Sixties”: Shameless? Part 21

Continued from last week. Fifteen months would pass until March 1992′s 2000 AD Action Special and the next of Millar’s superhero stories to see print. A stillborn revamping of the Sixties British superhero The Spider, it… [more]

Boix’s cover for 1977’s 2000AD #8, a prime example of the “slightly dodgy, anarchic material” which young Millar struggled to enjoy.“That Slightly Dodgy, Anarchic Material”: Shameless? Part 20

Continued from last week. The obviousness of Millar’s influences would become more and more of a problem as his work for Fleetway continued. Of course, 2000AD had been founded upon a deliberate policy of appropriating and… [more]

by Simon Bisley“It’s A Rare Thing to be Ordinary These Days”: Shameless? Part 18

Continued from last week. In fact, it’s more than possible that Morrison actually had a considerable influence upon the format of Zenith: Tales of the Alternative Earths. Four years previously, he’d written his own series of… [more]