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Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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“The Summoning”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing #49

Swamp Thing #49 “The Summoning” Cover date: June 1986. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Stan Woch and Alfredo Alcala. Editor: Karen Berger. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza This issue opens with a recap of the… [more]

“It’s A Rare Thing to be Ordinary These Days”: Shameless? Part 18

Continued from last week. In fact, it’s more than possible that Morrison actually had a considerable influence upon the format of Zenith: Tales of the Alternative Earths. Four years previously, he’d written his own series of… [more]

Miracleman, Chapter 9: The Avoidance of Liz Moran

We’ve begun discussing chapter nine of Alan Moore’s Miracleman (parts 1, 2, 3, and 4), illustrated by Alan Davis. Today, we continue our exploration of that chapter.

Yet Those Hands Will Never Hold Anything: Emiya Shirou as the Interactive Superhero of Fate/Stay Night (Part 1)

The super-hero genre is something that has not only cross-pollinated into different media, but has–in itself–been subject to a considerable amount of scrutiny. Superheroes have been changed into gritty, horrifyingly realistic beings by the Revisionism… [more]

The Garden and the Wilderness: Walking Dead #7-12

The second arc of Robert Kirkman’s Walking Dead follows Rick Grimes and his group of survivors dealing with the ramifications of being forced from the sanctuary of their roadside camp site and back into the… [more]

Tyrant Issue Two: Blood and Berries

The second issue of Tyrant starts on a more introspective note than the first. Steve Bissette opens the story with a quote from Alfred Hitchcock’s film, Vertigo: Somewhere in here I was born, and there I… [more]

1986: D.P.7 — Reality Vs. Fantasy

The previous installment recounted how in the landmark year of 1986, Marvel and editor in chief Jim Shooter introduced the New Universe, a new fictional reality, that was intended to be a more realistic setting… [more]

From The Saviour to Judge Dredd and Zenith: Shameless? Part 17

Continued from last week. For a brief moment in early 1990, Millar’s career appeared to be unambiguously prospering. As of May, Trident had, in addition to The Saviour, added Millar’s The Shadowmen to their schedule. Though… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #7

After a two issue break, Superman is back to battle the Collector of Worlds and save Metropolis. Strapping an oxygen tank to his back, Superman is going to leap into space to reach the Collector… [more]

The Old World: Comics and Cultural Reclamation in Sandman #38

Worthy expressions of folk myth are few and far between in the mainstream media, but persist as the most iconic means of contemporary storytelling. At the conclusion of A Game Of You, Gaiman introduces a… [more]

“A Murder of Crows”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing #48

Swamp Thing #48 “A Murder of Crows” Cover date: May 1986. Writer: Alan Moore. Artist: John Totleben. Editor: Karen Berger. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letterer: John Costanza. We are off to an atmospheric start in this… [more]

“Celibacy Being Such a Drag”: Shameless? Part 16

Continued from last week. It often appears that Millar is determined to deny any interpretation of his work that he doesn’t approve of. Yet as we’ve discussed, he repeatedly fails to produce comics whose political content… [more]

Future Progressive, Past Regressive: Livewires

Adam Warren’s Livewires is Perfection. This is not a word I use lightly, especially when the thing involved is a one-off project by a person who is often considered a not-very-major-creator[1] ™ but Livewires: Clockwork… [more]

The Garden and the Wilderness: Walking Dead #1-6

Image Comics’ monumentally successful ongoing series Walking Dead presents itself as a story of survival – specifically the survival of the comic’s protagonist, Rick Grimes, in an apocalyptic world that has been overrun by flesh-eating… [more]

Tyrant Issue One: Knock Knock

The first issue of Tyrant, Steve Bissette’s short lived fictional biography of a T-Rex, came out in September of 1994. The series was published by Bissette’s own company, SpiderBaby Grafix. The story lasts 21 pages,… [more]

“The Parliament of Trees”: Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing #47

Swamp Thing #47 “The Parliament of Trees” Cover date: April 1986. Writer: Alan Moore. Artists: Stan Woch and Ron Randall. Colorist: Tatjana Wood. Letters: John Costanza. Editor: Karen Berger. This issue opens with the first… [more]

“The Evil was the Act of Violence…”: Shameless? Part 15

Continued from last week. Millar’s preference for deconstructing genre can at times make for routine and predictable comic books. For those who’d prefer more of close observation, ambition and innovation, and less of the bare bones… [more]

Is Superman Still Relevant in a Postmodern World?

Superman. The name alone conjures up images of capes flapping in the skies over thriving metropolises, walls exploding as a rock-hard fist punches through them, and criminals quaking in fear before a hulking mountain of… [more]

Deconstructing the Deconstructions: Hyper Drama and Realism in Superman: Secret Identity

Part of the essence of the superhero genre lies in hyperbole; by this I mean to say that in a superhero “story” (here referring to the output of Marvel, DC and they many succors and… [more]

Humanity, Heroism, and Action: Grant Morrison’s Action Comics #6

The Anti-Superman Army that was teased at the end of the previous issue appears at the beginning of this issue. It appears that the Dealmaker from the first issue (who has popped up a few… [more]

The Last Days of Superman

Superman might be the world’s most popular superhero. He’s also among the most difficult to write. Through the years we’ve seen Superman travel through time, endure the heat of the sun, and perform so many… [more]

1986: D.P.7 — Group Therapy for Superhumans

In 1986, twenty-five years after the publication of Fantastic Four #1, which launched the modern Marvel Universe, Marvel editor in chief Jim Shooter introduced a new fictional reality in Marvel Comics, the New Universe. This… [more]

Superman’s Rejection of American Exceptionalism

In February of 1940, Superman ended World War II and prevented the future Cold War altogether through flying around the world by capturing both Adolf Hitler and Josef Stalin and delivering them to international authorities… [more]

“The Flat Earth Was Round”: Shameless? Part 14

Continued from last week. Where religion’s concerned, there’s nothing but Catholicism to be seen in The Saviour. Not only is there no mention of any other form of Christianity, but there’s not a hint of… [more]

On “How Superman Would Win the War”

One of the best Superman stories – and probably one of the most important super-hero stories ever told – is also one of the shortest. What’s more, the story didn’t appear in a Superman comic;… [more]