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Doctor Who:

Russell T. Davies Era (2005-2010)

Russell T. Davies

Russell T. Davies in his era's TARDIS set

Many had tried to revive Doctor Who, but it was Russell T. Davies who did so.

Davies brought many changes to the franchise. The most obvious were structural: his show would be an hour-long broadcast (with about 45 minutes of material), modeled after American dramas. Each episode would have its own title, even when they continued from one another, rather than following the original show’s format of titling episodes as merely parts of longer stories. Most of the new episodes would be single-episode stories, with a few two-part stories per season (and, arguably, one three-part story). These episodic seasons would each be united as a whole, however, by both the cast (either the Doctor or his main companion changed each season) and by a continuing narrative thread, woven through the episodes and culminating in a multi-part extravaganza of a season finale. And just to make things even more dramatic, he planned all along to have the Doctor regenerate at the end of the first season, which also allowed Davies to introduce new viewers to the concept.

Davies decided to only slowly roll out the Doctor’s famous villains, so as not to overwhelm new viewers. Thus, the Daleks appeared in his first season, the Cybermen in the second, and the Master in the third. (The far less popular Sontarans returned in the fourth, as well as the Dalek leader Davros.)

Davies also fundamentally changed the nature of the Doctor. The Doctor’s persona had changed considerably, between incarnations, from his stern beginnings to his sillier personalities in the 1980s. Davies’s Doctors both were men who could alternate between serious and whimsical. But more than ever before, they expressed a profound joy at their own adventures and a sometimes bubbling love of humanity, foibles and all. Now more than ever, the Doctor expressed the viewer’s own wonder at these fantastic adventures through time and space.

But perhaps no change was more meaningful than the way Davies reconsidered the role of the Doctor’s companions. Originally begun as audience identification figures, companions frequently came and went on the original show, often with abrupt goodbyes or none at all. Davies returned to the idea of the companion as an audience identification figure, consistently having them marvel at their adventures long after their introductory episode.

But he also gave them interior space and real personalities like ever before. While past companions often showed loyalty and affection for the Doctor, a romantic subtext often lay beneath the surface. Davies brought this to the fore, reflecting the reality of companions who adventure through space and time due to a single, powerful man. But Davies’ companions also feared abandonment, and the possibility that they might be someday left behind, their best years impossibly behind them, lurks throughout his tenure.

In truth, this was only part of an increased concern, on Davies’s part, with real-world social implications. Any sci-fi series, especially set in the present day, must deal with the problem of consequences, in which society may deform due to the presence of elements such as extraterrestrials or sophisticated technology. The original series had largely avoided this: the British government (and its agency UNIT) certainly knew of many alien species and invasions, but the public remained blissfully unaware. In the revived series, alien invasions became increasingly publicly recognized. And some of Davies’s best work (such as “Love & Monsters”) addressed how the Doctor’s presence had in fact changed culture in subtler ways.

The Davies era is also the first in which Doctor Who finally had a successful spin-off — and not one but two. Torchwood (the name is an anagram for “Doctor Who”) debuted in late 2006, after the extraterrestrial-handling agency was used in the revived Doctor Who‘s second series. The series, which might be loosely considered a more mature version of The X-Files, carried the Doctor Who universe into more explicit content than ever before. Just over two months later, The Sarah Jane Adventures debuted in a special, with a regular series following later in 2007. It took the franchise in the opposite direction, offering kid-friendly fare starring fans’ favorite companion from the Doctor’s history.

Following the fourth series, which concluded in mid-2008, Doctor Who went on hiatus. In lieu of a new series, Davies would offer three specials, in addition to the usual Christmas specials for 2008 and 2009. These would be used to wrap up his tenure, as well as that of the Tenth Doctor. During this period, Torchwood also shifted formats; after two series, it returned in the form of a five-episode mini-series, airing daily. The Sarah Jane Adventures continued normally. Davies would describe his experience, particularly on the Torchwood mini-series, as having solidified his own preference for the mini-series over episodic television.

Davies then handed control of Doctor Who to Steven Moffat, who had written several of the most beloved episodes under Davies’s tenure. Moffat’s debut, with a new Doctor, would receive unprecedented international attention. (I still recall sitting at Starbucks, outside St. Louis, listening in astonishment to teenage girls discussing Moffat’s new Doctor and arguing over whether his first season constituted a new show entirely — a rather fine point about a British sci-fi series.) Moffat would take the show in a different direction, focusing on long-running mysteries, but he would keep virtually all of the changes Davies had brought to the show (except general awareness of extraterrestrials). His success owed much to the groundwork Davies had laid, both structurally and in terms of the attention the Davies era had increasingly won.

While Doctor Who was certainly beloved, the success of Davies’s relaunched series was hardly assured, even in Britain. By the time Davies left, Doctor Who had become something of a critical darling, had spawned a franchise for the first time in the show’s long history, and had achieved a fanbase in the United States like never before. He indisputably left the franchise better than he found it, and all subsequent interpretations of the Doctor would, to one extent or another, be in his shadow.

In the following table, all episodes are roughly 45 minutes in length, unless otherwise specified. Regular episodes of The Sarah Jane Adventures, which uniformly broke stories over two roughly 25-minute episodes, have been combined to make a single listing for each story, making each comparable with an episode of Doctor Who or Torchwood.

Series 1 (2005)

Doctor Who Vol. 2 #1

“Rose”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

first episode; first appearance of the Ninth Doctor (played by Christopher Eccleston); first appearance of Rose Tyler, who becomes the Doctor’s companion in this episode; the Doctor’s comments about his appearance as he looks in a mirror (in Rose’s flat) imply that his regeneration is recent; the Doctor battles the Autons; aired 26 Mar 2005

Doctor Who Vol. 2 #2

“The End of the World”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

occurs in the year 5,000,000,000; introduces the villain Lady Cassandra (next seen in the second-season debut, “New Earth”); introduces the Face of Boe (also next seen in “New Earth”); aired 2 Apr 2005

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #3

“The Unquiet Dead”

  • written by Mark Gatiss

in 1879 Scotland, the Doctor and Rose meet Queen Victoria and battle a werewolf; the werewolf tells Rose she has “burnt like the Sun” (explained in this season’s finale, “The Parting of the Ways”); Queen Victoria founds the Torchwood Institute after the events of this episode; aired 9 Apr 2005

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #4

“Aliens of London”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

the Doctor and Rose return to the present, but 12 months have past instead of 12 months (angering her boyfriend Mickey Smith and her mother Jackie Tyler); introduces the Slitheen; an alien spaceship crashes into the River Thames; aired 16 Apr 2005

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #5

“World War Three”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

continued from “Aliens of London”; features Harriet Jones, who will be seen as Prime Minister in “The Christmas Invasion”; after the climax, the Slitheen presence is dismissed as a hoax; reportedly titled “Aliens of London, Part 2″ until the last minute (continuing how the previous series titled continued stories by the same title); aired 23 Apr 2005

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #6

“Dalek”

  • written by Robert Shearman

set in Utah in the year 2012; introduces companion Adam Mitchell; Rose and Adam allude to a long-time joke among fans that Daleks can’t climb stairs, although Daleks had been shown to hover in past stories (and explicitly climbed stairs in 1988′s “Remembrance of the Daleks”); features a Cyberman head on display (a new version of the Cybermen would be introduced in episode #19, “Rise of the Cybermen”); aired 30 Apr 2005

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #7

“The Long Game”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

set in the year 200,000 aboard the news media space station, Satellite 5; the Doctor expels Adam Mitchell from the TARDIS for trying to manipulate future knowledge for personal gain (ironically, Rose would try to change the past in “Father’s Day,” the very next episode, but she would not be expelled, presumably because her motivations were purer); aired 7 May 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #8

“Father’s Day”

  • written by Paul Cornell

Rose alters time to save her father (although a parallel-universe version of him would return in episode #19, “Rise of the Cybrermen”); aired 14 May 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #9

“The Empty Child”

  • written by Steven Moffat

first appearance of Captain Jack Harkness; occurs in London during the Blitz of World War II; aired 21 May 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #10

“The Doctor Dances”

  • written by Steven Moffat

continued from “The Empty Child”; aired 28 May 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #11

“Boom Town”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

features a Slitheen who survived “World War Three” (the Slitheen would return in the first season of The Sarah Jane Adventures); the Doctor recharges the TARDIS in Cardiff (while not depicted in this episode, Torchwood Three, run by an older and immortal Jack Harkness, is underneath the TARDIS); aired 4 June 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #12

“Bad Wolf”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

the Daleks return; references “Torchwood” for the first time on the show; aired 11 June 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #13

“The Parting of the Ways”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

continued from “Bad Wolf”; the Doctor, Rose, Jack, and Mickey battle the Daleks; the Doctor regenerates; first appearance of the Tenth Doctor (played by David Tennant); first season finale; aired 18 June 2005

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Series 2 (2005-2006)

Doctor Who Vol. 2 #13.5

untitled (a.k.a. “Born Again”)

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired as part of a special for the charity Children in Need; 7 minutes; aired 18 Nov 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #14

“The Christmas Invasion” -- 60 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

Christmas special; aired 25 Dec 2005
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #15

“New Earth”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

second season debut; a sequel to “The End of the World,” set on New Earth 23 years later; the villain Lady Cassandra (from “The End of the World”) returns and dies; the Face of Boe (from “The End of the World”) returns (next seen in “Gridlock”); aired 15 Apr 2006

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #16

“Tooth and Claw”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired 22 Apr 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #17

“School Reunion”

  • written by Toby Whithouse

features Sarah Jane Smith; aired 29 Apr 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #18

“The Girl in the Fireplace”

  • written by Steven Moffat

aired 6 May 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #19

“Rise of the Cybermen”

  • written by Tom MacRae

introduces the new Cybermen; aired 13 May 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #20

“The Age of Steel”

  • written by Tom MacRae

continues from “Rise of the Cybermen”; aired 20 May 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #21

“The Idiot’s Lantern”

  • written by Mark Gatiss

aired 27 May 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #22

“The Impossible Planet”

  • written by Matt Jones

aired 3 June 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #23

“The Satan Pit”

  • written by Matt Jones

continues from “The Impossible Planet”; aired 10 June 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #24

“Love & Monsters”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired 17 June 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #25

“Fear Her”

  • written by Matthew Graham

aired 24 June 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #26

“Army of Ghosts”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired 1 July 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #27

“Doomsday”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

continues from “Army of Ghosts”; companion Rose Tyler departs the show; second season finale; aired 8 July 2006

Series 3 (2006-2007)

Doctor Who Vol. 2 #28

“The Runaway Bride”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

Christmas special; occurs directly following “Doomsday”; aired 25 Dec 2006
Torchwood #1

“Everything Changes”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

first episode; aired 22 Oct 2006

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Torchwood #2

“Day One”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

occurs shortly after “Everything Changes”; aired 22 Oct 2006 (the same date as “Everything Changes”)
Torchwood #3

“Ghost Machine”

  • written by Helen Raynor

aired 29 Oct 2006
Torchwood: Another Life

written by Peter Anghelides; Torchwood novel #1; occurs after “Ghost Machine” (refers to the pistol training Jack gave Gwen in that episode); occurs before “Cyberwoman” (several times, Ianto goes into the basement, claiming he is doing filing, although the truth is shown in that episode); Rhys mentions his coworker Lucy, who’s gone on a diet (foreshadowing the novel Slow Decay); Jack asks Toshiko to search hospital records for a patient with a binary vascular system (a reference to Jack’s continuing search for the Doctor following “The Parting of the Ways”); features the Blaidd Drwg (which means “Bad Wolf”) nuclear facility from the second-season Doctor Who episode “Boom Town”; 256 pages; published 4 Jan 2007

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Torchwood: Another Life audiobook
abridged version on 3 CDs, read by John Barrowman; published 2 Apr 2007

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Torchwood: Border Princes

written by Dan Abnett; Torchwood novel #2; occurs after “Ghost Machine” (Gwen refers to seeing a ghost, as seen in that episode, and Owen asks “Mr. Morgan?”, mimicking his line from that episode); the first three Torchwood novels all reference an ambiguous “Operation: Goldenrod”; 256 pages; published 4 Jan 2007

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Torchwood: Border Princes audiobook
abridged version on 3 CDs, read by Eve Myles; published 2 Apr 2007

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Torchwood: Slow Decay

written by Andy Lane; Torchwood novel #3; features Lucy (whom Rhys referenced in the Torchwood novel Another Life); gives more information on “Operation: Goldenrod” (referred to in the first three Torchwood novels and which happened when Suzie Costello was still part of the team); 256 pages; published 4 Jan 2007

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Torchwood: Slow Decay audiobook
abridged version on 3 CDs, read by Burn Gorman; published 2 Apr 2007

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Torchwood #4

“Cyberwoman”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

probably the best episode of the series so far; aired 5 Nov 2006
Torchwood #5

“Small Worlds”

  • written by Peter J. Hammond

pretty bad; aired 12 Nov 2006
Torchwood #6

“Countrycide”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

not bad, mostly for its conclusion and epilogue; aired 19 Nov 2006
Torchwood #7

“Greeks Bearing Gifts”

  • written by Toby Whithouse

aired 26 Nov 2006
Torchwood #8

“They Keep Killing Suzie”

  • written by Paul Tomalin and Dan McCulloch

pretty damn good and probably the best of the series so far; aired 3 Dec 2006
Torchwood #9

“Random Shoes”

  • written by Jacquetta May

aired 10 Dec 2006
Torchwood #10

“Out of Time”

  • written by Catherine Tregenna

addresses euthanasia; aired 17 Dec 2006
Torchwood #11

“Combat”

  • written by Noel Clarke

while not great, interesting for its fight club aspect; aired 24 Dec 2006
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #29

“Smith and Jones”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

third season debut; first appearance of Martha Jones; aired 31 Mar 2007

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #30

“The Shakespeare Code”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

occurs directly after “Smith and Jones”; aired 7 Apr 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #31

“Gridlock”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

occurs directly after “The Shakespeare Code”; set in New New York from “New Earth,” 30 years after that episode; the Face of Boe returns (third appearance) and dies, ambiguously calling the Doctor “old friend” (explained in “Last of the Time Lords”) and revealing that the Doctor is “not alone” (explained in “Utopia”); aired 14 Apr 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #32

“Daleks in Manhattan”

  • written by Helen Raynor

occurs directly after “Gridlock”; aired 21 Apr 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #33

“Evolution of the Daleks”

  • written by Helen Raynor

continued from “Daleks in Manhattan”; aired 28 Apr 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #34

“The Lazarus Experiment”

  • written by Stephen Greenhorn

set in the present, directly after “Smith and Jones” (meaning no Torchwood episodes should come between these two episodes); aired 5 May 2007
Torchwood #12

“Captain Jack Harkness”

  • written by Catherine Tregenna

occurs shortly before “End of Days”; aired 1 Jan 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #35

“42″

  • written by Chris Chibnall

present-day sequences occur on Election Day, shortly after “The Lazarus Experiment”; aired 19 May 2007 (after a skipped week)
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #36

“Human Nature”

  • written by Paul Cornell

aired 26 May 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #37

“The Family of Blood”

  • written by Paul Cornell

continued from “Human Nature”; aired 2 June 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #38

“Blink”

  • written by Steven Moffat

aired 9 June 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #39

“The Infinite Quest”

  • written by Alan Barnes

animated, regular-length episode, serialized over 12 weeks (plus an extra 13th episode) on the show Totally Doctor Who from 2 April to 30 June 2007; although there’s a lot of room for debate about when this is set, it makes the most sense here (everything from “Smith and Jones” to “The Lazarus Experiment” forms a unit with little room for interruption — “42″ follows on themes of “The Lazarus Experiment,” and Martha’s still not fully confident in her role as companion there, as she seems to be here — the following three episodes decentralize Doctor Who and Martha, for the first time giving the impression that the pair have had several adventures we haven’t seen, and this episode has that same feeling but returns its focus to the main characters again, so it makes the most sense after those three episodes — and of course, it cannot occur later, because “Utopia” leads into the season’s final two episodes)
Torchwood #13

“End of Days”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

first season finale; occurs just before “Utopia”; aired 1 Jan 2007 (the same day as “Captain Jack Harkness”)
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #40

“Utopia”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired 16 June 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #41

“The Sound of Drums”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

continues from “Utopia”; confirms that Election Day occurred four days after “Smith and Jones”; aired 23 June 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #42

“Last of the Time Lords” -- 52 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

third season finale; continues from “The Sound of Drums”; aired 30 June 2007

Series 4 (2007-2008)

Doctor Who Vol. 2 #42.5

“Time Crash” -- 8 minutes

  • written by Steven Moffat

aired as part of a special for the charity Children in Need; occurs concurrently with the final scene of “The Last of the Time Lords”; aired 16 Nov 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #43

“Voyage of the Damned” -- 72 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

Christmas special; occurs shortly after “The Last of the Time Lords”; aired 25 Dec 2007
Torchwood #14

“Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

second season debut; first appearance of Captain John Hart; an excellent episode that makes the show fun like never before; aired 16 Jan 2008
Torchwood #15

“Sleeper”

  • written by James Moran

aired 23 Jan 2008
Torchwood #16

“To the Last Man”

  • written by Helen Raynor

aired 30 Jan 2008
Torchwood: Something in the Water

written by Trevor Baxendale; Torchwood novel #4; occurs between “To the Last Man” and “Meat”; 256 pages; published 6 Mar 2008

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Torchwood: Trace Memory

written by David Llewellyn; Torchwood novel #5; references several past episodes of both Doctor Who and Torchwood, including “To the Last Man” (which this book should occur after); occurs before “Reset” (meaning it may occur here, after “Meat,” or after “Adam”); 256 pages; published 6 Mar 2008

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Torchwood #17

“Meat”

  • written by Catherine Tregenna

occurs “about a year” after “Everything Changes” (Torchwood #1); aired 6 Feb 2008
Torchwood: The Twilight Streets

written by Gary Russell; Torchwood novel #6; includes a flashback to the first-season Doctor Who episode ”Boom Town”; Owen refers to the coup against Jack in “End of Days”; occurs after the Torchwood novel Something in the Water (refers to the cream sofa Rhys and Gwen were considering buying in that story); includes visions of a possible future, including Owen’s condition (following “Dead Man Walking”) and Rhys saving Gwen’s life (in “Something Borrowed”); occurs between “Meat” and “Reset” (meaning it may occur here or after “Adam”); 256 pages; published 6 Mar 2008

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Torchwood #18

“Adam”

  • written by Catherine Tregenna

a pretty good episode, not perfect but with a many great touches; aired 13 Feb 2008
Torchwood #19

“Reset”

  • written by J.C. Wilsher

features Martha Jones, who’s now working for UNIT; Martha and Jack reference “The Last of the Time Lords,” which he later says occurred “recently”; aired 13 Feb 2008 (the same day as “Adam”)
Torchwood #20

“Dead Man Walking”

  • written by Matt Jones

features Martha Jones; occurs shortly after “Reset”; aired 20 Feb 2008
Torchwood #21

“A Day in the Death”

  • written by Joseph Lidster

features Martha Jones; occurs shortly after “Dead Man Walking”; a good episode; aired 27 Feb 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #1

“Invasion of the Bane” -- 60 minutes

  • written by Gareth Roberts and Russell T. Davies

first episode; New Year’s special; occurs much later than its airdate (Sarah Jane says K-9 has been plugging a black hole for the past year and a half, and K-9 was featured in “School Reunion” during season two, so this would place this around the end of Doctor Who’s season three, at the earliest; but because the kids are out of school and moving, this probably occurs early during summer break, given the next episode has the kids going back to school); aired 1 Jan 2007

Torchwood: Pack Animals

written by Peter Anghelides; Torchwood novel #7; occurs between “A Day in the Death” and “Something Borrowed”; features a Weevil attack, alien tech at the zoo, and an alien invasion on Halloween; 256 pages; published 16 Oct 2008

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Torchwood #22

“Something Borrowed”

  • written by Phil Ford

a pretty good episode, though it shifts the tone to something more comedic after the seriousness of the past few episodes; aired 5 Mar 2008
Torchwood #23

“From out of the Rain”

  • written by Peter J. Hammond

aired 12 Mar 2008
Torchwood: SkyPoint

written by Phil Ford; Torchwood novel #7; features SkyPoint, a new high-rise block of flats popular with young Asian couples; occurs between “Something Borrowed” and “Fragments” / “Exit Wounds” (and is the final novel to feature Owen and Tosh; 256 pages; published 16 Oct 2008

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Torchwood #24

“Adrift”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

aired 19 Mar 2008
Torchwood #25

“Fragments”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

Captain John Hart returns; a pretty brilliant episode; aired 21 Mar 2008
Torchwood #26

“Exit Wounds”

  • written by Chris Chibnall

final episode; features Captain John Hart; continued from “Fragments”; aired 4 Apr 2008

The Sarah Jane Adventures #2

“Revenge of the Slitheen”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

first season debut; the Slitheen return (after Doctor Who episode #5, “World War Three”); occurs some time (a few months?) after “Invasion of the Bane,” as kids are going back to school (which has been improved, so this is presumably after a summer, as opposed to a shorter winter break); aired 24 Sept 2007
The Sarah Jane Adventures #3

“Eye of the Gorgon”

  • written by Phil Ford

aired in two parts, on 1 and 8 Oct 2007
The Sarah Jane Adventures #4

“Warriors of Kudlak”

  • written by Phil Gladwin

Lance’s posters show that this takes place after “Blink”; aired in two parts, on 15 and 22 Oct 2007
The Sarah Jane Adventures #5

“Whatever Happened to Sarah Jane”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

the Trickster’s threat is followed up upon in “Turn Left” (so this must occur before that episode); references the interactive short “Attack of the Graske”; aired in two parts, on 29 Oct and 5 Nov 2007
The Sarah Jane Adventures #6

“The Lost Boy”

  • written by Phil Ford

first season finale; the Slitheen from “Revenge of the Slitheen” (this season’s debut episode); aired in two parts, on 12 and 19 Nov 2007
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #44

“Partners in Crime”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

fourth season debut; 50 minutes; aired 5 Apr 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #45

“The Fires of Pompeii” -- 50 minutes

  • written by James Moran

aired 12 Apr 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #46

“Planet of the Ood”

  • written by Keith Temple

aired 19 Apr 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #47

“The Sontaran Stratagem”

  • written by Helen Raynor

features Martha Jones (after her appearances on Torchwood); aired 26 Apr 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #48

“The Poison Sky”

  • written by Helen Raynor

continues from “The Sontaran Stratagem”; features Martha Jones; aired 3 May 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #49

“The Doctor’s Daughter”

  • written by Stephen Greenhorn

occurs shortly after “The Poison Sky”; features Martha Jones, who departs at the episode’s end; introduces Jenny, cloned daughter of the Doctor, played by Georgia Moffett; aired 10 May 2008

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Doctor Who Vol. 2 #50

“The Unicorn and the Wasp”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

aired 17 May 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #51

“Silence in the Library”

  • written by Steven Moffat

first appearance of River Song; aired 31 May 2008 (after a skipped week)
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #52

“Forest of the Dead”

  • written by Steven Moffat

continued from “Silence in the Library”; aired 7 June 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #53

“Midnight”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired 14 June 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #54

“Turn Left” -- 50 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

the Trickster follows up on his appearance in “Whatever Happened to Sarah Jane?”; aired 21 June 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #55

“The Stolen Earth”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

aired 28 June 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #56

“Journey’s End” -- 65 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

continued from “The Stolen Earth”; fourth season finale; aired 5 July 2008

Specials (2008-2010)

Torchwood: Almost Perfect

written by James Goss; Torchwood novel #9; occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto); 256 pages; published 16 Oct 2008

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The Sarah Jane Adventures #7

“The Last Sontaran”

  • written by Phil Ford

second season debut; follows up on “The Poison Sky”; aired 29 Sept 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #8

“The Day of the Clown”

  • written by Phil Ford

aired in two parts, on 6 and 13 Oct 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #9

“Secrets of the Stars”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

uses footage from “School Reunion” and “Journey’s End” (which thus must occur previously); aired in two parts, on 20 and 27 Oct 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #10

“The Mark of the Berserker”

  • written by Joseph Lidster

mentions the Daleks as common knowledge, thus helping to place this after “Journey’s End”; aired in two parts, on 3 and 10 Nov 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #11

“The Temptation of Sarah Jane Smith”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

occurs after “Turn Left”; aired in two parts, on 17 and 24 Nov 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #12

“Enemy of the Bane”

  • written by Phil Ford

second season finale; again mentions common knowledge of aliens, especially true after “Journey’s End”; aired in two parts, on 1 and 8 Dec 2008
The Sarah Jane Adventures #12.5

“From Raxacoricofallapatorius with Love” -- 5 minutes

  • written by Gareth Roberts and Clayton Hickman

features Ronnie Corbett and K-9; features a Slitheen; aired as part of the 2009 Comic Relief special; aired 3 Mar 2009
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #57

“The Next Doctor” -- 60 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

Christmas special; aired 25 Dec 2008
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #58

“Dreamland”

  • written by Phil Ford

animated, regular-length episode; serialized in six parts from 21–26 Nov 2009; while this episode’s placement is certainly debatable, it does not reflect the theme of the Doctor’s coming death, which increasingly dominates the Doctor Who specials, and so it should probably be placed early within them (while still allowing “The Next Doctor,” aired almost a year prior, to come first)
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #59

“Planet of the Dead” -- 60 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies and Gareth Roberts

Easter special; aired 11 Apr 2009
Torchwood: Into the Silence

written by Sarah Pinborough; Torchwood novel #10; occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto); 256 pages; published 25 June 2009

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Torchwood: Bay of the Dead

written by Mark Morris; Torchwood novel #11; a zombie story; occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto); 256 pages; published 25 June 2009

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Torchwood: The House that Jack Built

written by Guy Adams; Torchwood novel #12; features ghosts in the house Jack inhabited in 1906; occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto); 256 pages; published 25 June 2009

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Torchwood: Risk Assessment

written by James Goss; Torchwood novel #13; occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto); 256 pages; published 1 Oct 2009

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Torchwood: The Undertaker’s Gift

written by Trevor Baxendale; Torchwood novel #14; features the Hokrala lawyers (mentioned at the end of Baxendale’s prior Torchwood novel, Something in the Water); occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto); 256 pages; published 1 Oct 2009

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Torchwood: Consequences

“The Baby Farmers”

  • written by David Llewellyn
  • a story of the Victorian-era Torchwood, including Jack as a freelance operative

“Kaleidoscope”

  • written by Sarah Pinborough
  • occurs between “End of Days” and “Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang”
  • features Gwen, Owen, Ianto, and Toshiko
  • in Jack’s absence, Toshiko becomes team leader

“The Wrong Hands”

  • written by Andrew Cartmel
  • occurs between “Exit Wounds” and Torchwood: Children of Earth (features only Jack, Gwen, and Ianto)

“Virus”

  • written by James Moran
  • occurs hours after “The Wrong Hands”
  • Ianto single-handedly saves the day (nice, given his death in Children of Earth)

“Consequences”

  • written by Joseph Lidster
  • involves a mysterious book mentioned briefly in “The Baby Farmers” (the first story in this book)

Torchwood novel #15; 256 pages; published 1 Oct 2009

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Torchwood: Children of Earth #1

“Day One”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

first episode; aired 6 July 2009

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Torchwood: Children of Earth #2

“Day Two”

  • written by John Fay

continued from “Day One”; aired 7 July 2009
Torchwood: Children of Earth #3

“Day Three”

  • written by Russell T. Davies and James Moran

continued from “Day Two”; aired 8 July 2009
Torchwood: Children of Earth #4

“Day Four”

  • written by John Fay

continued from “Day Three”; aired 9 July 2009
Torchwood: Children of Earth #5

“Day Five”

  • written by Russell T. Davies

final episode; continued from “Day Four”; aired 10 July 2009

Doctor Who Vol. 2 #60

“The Waters of Mars” -- 60 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies and Phil Ford

Autumn special; aired 15 Nov 2009
The Sarah Jane Adventures #13

“Prisoner of the Judoon”

  • written by Phil Ford

third season debut; aired in two parts, on 15 and 16 Oct 2009
The Sarah Jane Adventures #14

“The Mad Woman in the Attic”

  • written by Joseph Lidster

aired in two parts, on 22 and 23 Oct 2009
The Sarah Jane Adventures #15

“The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith”

  • written by Gareth Roberts

features the Doctor; foreshaddows “The End of Time” (which it was filmed after); aired in two parts, on 29 and 30 Oct 2009
The Sarah Jane Adventures #16

“The Eternity Trap”

  • written by Phil Ford

third season finale; aired in two parts, on 5 and 6 Nov 2009
The Sarah Jane Adventures #17

“Mona Lisa’s Revenge”

  • written by Phil Ford

features the International Gallery, preveiously seen in “Planet of the Dead”; aired in two parts, on 12 and 13 Nov 2009
The Sarah Jane Adventures #18

“The Gift”

  • written by Rupert Laight

the Slitheen return; aired in two parts, on 19 and 20 Nov 2009
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #61

“The End of Time, Part 1″ -- 60 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies

Christmas special; aired 25 Dec 2009
Doctor Who Vol. 2 #62

“The End of Time, Part 2″ -- 75 minutes

  • written by Russell T. Davies (Steven Moffat wrote the final minute or so, setting up his tenure)

New Year’s special; continued from “The End of time, Part 1″; cameo appearance by Jack Harkness (which occurs after Torchwood: Children of Earth); first appearance of the Eleventh Doctor (played by Matt Smith); aired 1 Jan 2010

Tagged , Russell T. Davies, The Sarah Jane Adventures, Torchwood, Torchwood: Children of Earth.