Reviews

Reviews of comic books, graphic novels, books on comics, and other comic-related media.

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ValerianValérian: Spaceships, Simulacra, and Star Wars

The French Connection is back after a long hiatus with the same purpose it had two years ago, to present and review significant bande-dessinées. Previous columns dealt with recent publications, works by Sfar, Trondheim or… [more]

Batman #678 (Alex Ross cover)Batman #678: The Zur-En-Arrh Connection

Grant Morrison’s Batman #678 relies heavily on reference to Batman #113 (February 1958), specifically Zur-En-Arrh.

page from Run, Bong-Gu, Run!Run, Bong-Gu, Run! Review

“Bong-Gu” is the Korean word for “fart.” Although my buddy Kevin says it’s actually “Pong-Gu,” which led to a very lengthy discussion about pronunciation. Then we agreed to call the whole thing off. Significance of… [more]

john hComics Round-Up

All sorts of different comics to review this time around: THE UNDERBURBS #1-5, by T.J. Dort and Joe Haley. This is a sort of goth/horror parody comic, with the humor coming from playing out the… [more]

final crisisBe Afraid, Be Very Afraid…

Editor’s Note: The irony is thick with this essay. It was written a few days ago, but with news of the DC-related story reported within the past day by The New York Daily News, it… [more]

countdownCountdown to Final Crisis #1

So, here it is then. After a year of issues (52 weeklies!), we’ve finally reached the end only to find out that it’s time to get on an entirely new train next week. But maybe… [more]

JessicaFarmCoverNewDreams, Nightmares & Visions: Haunted, Jessica Farm & Funeral of the Heart

In this article, we’ll be looking at three comics that deal with the life of the mind and the delights & terrors within. First up is Phillipe Dupuy’s HAUNTED, a book that’s part dream journal… [more]

Batman #673 (Mar 2008)Batman #673: The Lingering Shadow of 1963

Grant Morrison’s Batman has been courting controversy since it began. Batman has a son? Man-Bats learned ninjitsu? Comics can be full of words instead of pictures?

51hKMCL+HvL._SY300_Weirdling

As much as it fears me to admit this in a geek milieu, I must say I’m not a huge H.P. Lovecraft fan. I will say this about Lovecraft: he seems tailor-made for comics. Inexplicably,… [more]

page from Batman #663Batman #663 Review

Believe it or not, Grant Morrison’s “The Clown at Midnight,” published in Batman #663 (Mar 2007), has a lot in common with J.D. Salinger’s final published short story, “Hapworth 16, 1924.” Having crafted The Catcher in the… [more]

karasikI Shall Destroy All the Civilized Planets!

You ever get to a point where you’re all, like, “Bah! Comics! Who needs them?” Also, have you ever written something that starts off with a rhetorical question? Because you’re not supposed to do that.… [more]

JLA 5Meltzer’s Justice League of America: Now That We’ve All Calmed Down, Was the Comic Any Good?

This summer, hot off the fun of my “debate” with Douglas Wolk about New Avengers, I asked Andrew Gardner, comic fan and intelligent British guy, to begin an e-mail discussion with me about Brad Meltzer’s… [more]

eightballSeduction of the Innocent with EIGHTBALL!

You must have heard, by now, about the high school teacher forced to resign after assigning Eightball #22 to a freshman. If you haven’t read about this fiasco, Heidi covers it pretty well over at… [more]

Batman #668Batman #668 and Agatha Christie

Batman #668, by Grant Morrison and J.H. Williams III, is an excellent comic book. As the second installment of the three-part “Club of Heroes” story, it expands the story both inwardly and outwardly, creating a… [more]

harbinger 1Harbinger: The Beginning

It’s been said that you can never go back and that yesterday is just a dream. But with the recent publication of Valiant Entertainment’s new hardcover, Harbinger: The Beginning, it’s clear that yesterday is coming… [more]

Batman #666Batman #666: The Future Looks Back to the Past

Batman #666 begins with a Golden Age homage to the origin of Batman, featuring the words “Who He is and How He Came to Be,” just like in that classic Bob Kane story.

PrideofbaghdadThe Pride of Baghdad

When you make your living cutting brand new worlds whole cloth from your personal mental firmament, it takes a special kind of writer to splatter those brain children over twenty-odd pages of cheap newsprint on… [more]

newlogobigWeek The End

Well, with 52 over I just wanted to say thank you to all of you who read and commented on Who Are the 52? it was fun while it lasted. But never fear, I will… [more]

black holeBlack Hole

There are works out there that we get through the recommendations of others and then leave tucked away to collect dust, instead of digesting them right away and realizing that your friends have good taste.… [more]

1000 Steps to World Domination1000 Steps to World Domination

Rob Osbourne and The War of Art The creators who work in the field of mini-comics are a breed apart. Like the members of a garage band, honing their craft, the dedicated ones toil endlessly,… [more]

Batman #665Batman #665: The Doppelgangers Three

Ah, Batman #665. Morrison seems to be disappointing critics with his run on this title, and I find myself constantly defending the work. I trust him enough as a writer to wait and see how it… [more]

00Tanpenshu #1

A collection of three short stories, Hiroki Endo’s TANPENSHU Volume One is a hyper-dramatic punch in the gut. The sheer brutality of these stories sucks you into one of the morbid world of gangsters, melancholy… [more]

super fratSuper Frat: Rush Week Collection

Super Frat, a comic published by Silent Devil, is the story of a group of college-age males living in their own fraternity house off the campus of Ryesmore University, who have each been endowed with… [more]

X-Factor01-79The Peter David Factor: Part 10

X-Factor #79 (June 1992) — Rhapsody in Blue — This issue starts with a touch of suspense. The story begins in Two Forks, Maine where we see an elderly woman in an old-fashioned house calling… [more]

Batman #664 (May 2007)Batman #664: Bruce Wayne is Cool

So Grant Morrison follows up an intruiging Batman prose story full of dense allusions with… this. And the internet scratches its head.