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Timm2FaceThe Politics of Batman, Part 3: Understanding Batman’s Enemies

[Note: The following is reprinted from the book War, Politics and Superheroes] Aside from the fact that they are all, effectively, his “subjects,” Batman’s villains are connected to him in an even more visceral, symbolic way.… [more]

Wonder Woman_1Overcoming the Status Quo: Wonder Woman, Superheroes, and the American Criminal Justice System

In this three-part series, I explore where superheroes fit into popular conceptions of criminal justice in the United States, and the potential for Wonder Woman to help improve those conceptions. This week, I look at… [more]

The Anatomy of Zur-en-ArrhThe Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh is Available for Order by Comics Shops

Cody Walker’s The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman is now available for order through Diamond Comics Distributors. The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh is listed in the book section of the current Previews catalog. You… [more]

bb-houseThe Politics of Batman, Part 2: Batman Begins, Feudalism, and Neoconservatism

[Note: The following is reprinted from the book War, Politics and Superheroes] Batman Begins won the support of comic book aficionados across cyberspace as a “traditional” and pitch-perfect portrayal of Batman, while simultaneously providing a… [more]

ttWhy Don’t We Trust Filmmakers?

Where is the trust? That is the question I asked after the recent flurry of criticisms leveled at Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice. It got me thinking about fandom reactions in general when it… [more]

photoMy First Comic Con

My first experience at San Diego Comic Con was almost overwhelming. And I mean that in a literal sense: there were many times when I felt an almost irresistible temptation to “take a knee” and… [more]

HolyTerrorThe Politics of Batman, Part 1: Batman vs. Osama bin Laden

The following is an excerpt from the book War, Politics and Superheroes: When Frank Miller announced that he would be crafting a graphic novel in which Batman would confront real-world terrorist Osama bin Laden, journalists… [more]

Batman The Dark Knight Returns #1 - Page 1A Tale of Two Dark Knights…

Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns (or DKR) has long been considered one of the greatest works in comic books. Since its release in 1986, it has been lauded as an industry-changing story that helped… [more]

TwoWorldsHow Carmine Infantino Designed DC’s Silver Age

DC Comics’ Showcase #4, cover dated October 1956, is usually recognized as the book that launched the so-called Silver Age of comics by reintroducing the Flash and effectively reviving the superhero genre. The iconic cover… [more]

The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s BatmanSequart Releases The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman

Sequart Organization is proud to announce the publication of The Anatomy of Zur-en-Arrh: Understanding Grant Morrison’s Batman, by Cody Walker. Grant Morrison has made a career of redefining heroes, but his work with Batman has… [more]

Batfleck (first look)Some Cautious Thoughts on Zach Snyder’s Batman v Superman

Yesterday, Batman v Superman got a subtitle — Dawn of Justice — and began filming. I wrote about the film in a news story, but I thought I’d complement that with a few brief thoughts,… [more]

Batman v SupermanBatman v Superman Gets a Full Title, Begins Filming

It’s official: the Man of Steel sequel co-starring Batman will be titled Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. The subtitle clearly suggests that the film will feature the formation of the Justice League — which… [more]

e7eb52c0-dabd-11e3-928d-790595b088b3_batmobileWhy It Doesn’t Matter What Ben Affleck’s Batman Costume Looks Like

A rational person bases their judgement on previous experience. This applies across the board, but is often forgotten, particularly in emotional situations involving childhood memories. That’s the best explanation I can come up with for… [more]

Son_of_BatmanS.O.B. Indeed: A Review of the Animated Son of Batman Movie

SPOILERS BELOW: Last week, I had some Papa Gino’s pizza. It was a large, with extra cheese. (This is going to become relevant in a second, I promise.) I wasn’t too excited about it, honestly.… [more]

all scans are from 1998's Superman Adventures by Mark Millar, Mike Manley, Terru Austin et al“Nice to Meet You, Big Guy”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 15

Continued from last week. November 1998′s Superman Adventures #25 gave Millar one last substantial shot at depicting The Batman. Putting the overwrought misjudgements of the JLA Paradise Lost mini-series behind him, he returned to the conception… [more]

Cover to 1998’s JLA Paradise Lost #3, by Ariel Olivetti“Forgive me, Superman. I’m not very good at losing.”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 14

Continued from last week. Some in the UK fan community saw Millar as Morrison’s heir apparent on the JLA. But despite later claiming that he’d once turned down the chance to write the Justice League, Millar… [more]

Batman Year OneSuperhero Accessories: Part Three: Mo Bat-Money, Mo Bat-Problems

…continued from here. It’s worth noting that the original Klan and the fictional KKK seen in The Birth of a Nation were both begun by young rich white guys who lived in mansions. The hero… [more]

Panel from 1997’s JLA #4, By Morrison, Porter, Dell et al“An Arrogant, Aristocratic Batman?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 13

Continued from last week. But how were Morrison and Millar to explain away the Batman’s aloof and frequently contemptuous attitude towards even his fellow super-heroes? If the Dark Knight was to be cut away from the… [more]

By Morrison, Porter, Dell et al, from 1996/7’s JLA #1The Secret Origin of the JLA, and of “Mark Millar” Too: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 11

Continued from last week. It would be another seven months until Morrison and Millar’s next public collaboration on the Batman. In that time, the new JLA title would establish itself as a remarkably successful reboot. Its… [more]

2.1Superhero Accessories: Part Two: Truth, Justice, All That Stuff

…continued from here. DC have long had a problem fitting Superman into the grimmer world the DC Universe has become now its readership mostly consists of adults. It’s clear that senior editors feel the ‘big… [more]

Cover from the 2008 Aztek TPB – and before it the comic’s 1st issue in 1996 -  by N Steve Harris & Keith ChampagneThe Batman As Father Figure: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar Part 10

Continued from here. DC’s post-crisis, Dark Age portrayal of the Batman had long been a source of aggravation for both Morrison and Millar. Years before Morrison landed the job of scripting the JLA, the two men… [more]

magic-words-vis-1Building an Altar to the Super-Hero Holy Trinity

As I was reading Lance Parkin’s Magic Words, a biography of Alan Moore, I looked to my right at the nightstand against my wall and came to the realization that it is, in fact, an altar.… [more]

the-dark-knight-returns-on-a-horseSuperhero Accessories: Part One: Masked Vigilantes

Perhaps the most damning criticism Alan Moore made about superheroes has been overlooked in all the controversy around the ‘Last interview’: ‘the origin of capes and masks as ubiquitous superhero accessories can be deduced from… [more]

from 1997’s JLA #9, by Morrison, Oscar Jimenez et al“A Semi-Unhinged, Essentially Humourless Loner Struggling with Rage and Guilt”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 9

Continued from last week. Grant Morrison’s ambition was, it appears, to free the DCU from the constraints of both wonder-killing editorial dictats and the conventions of the Dark Age. Yet unregulated creative anarchy doesn’t seem to… [more]

From 1997’s JLA Secret Files #1, by Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, Howard Porter et alA Thousand Batmen Blooming: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 8

Continued from last week. The superhero genre had become more and more susceptible to the myth of the definitive version. It was a fan-consuming fallacy which presumed that each character possessed an irreducible core of utterly… [more]