Articles

Analytic articles, whether historical or literary, scholarly or popular. Views expressed are not necessarily those of Sequart.

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Further Defending the DC Relaunch — Superman

The air has been cleared a bit regarding Superman’s status in the DCnU, and (of course) it’s caused people to flip out a bit. Here is a quick rundown of the major changes: 1) A… [more]

Light Can’t be Translated: Alan Moore and the Green Lanterns as Colonizing Force

Is there anything more intensive and fundamental to learning a language than vocabulary? Of course not. To learn how to use language without vocabulary is like learning to play hockey with out a puck, stick,… [more]

Upgrade Your Vision: 3D Comics and Narrative Purpose

Within the narrative of Final Crisis, Morrison wrote a two-issue mini-series called Superman Beyond 3D (2008-2009). This story was placed into the Final Crisis collected publications, forming an integral part of the complete narrative.

O Captain, My Captain (Part 2)

As I explained in part 1 of this post, Captain America was very much a product of his times. He was created to oppose the tyranny, bigotry, and brutality of the original Axis of Evil: Nazi Germany,… [more]

Confined Spaces: Morning Glories and the Escape from Cynicism

It is not hyperbole to say cynicism has become a problem. It would also not be over dramatic to say the problem has ballooned into great proportions with each passing generation. While there are plenty… [more]

Super-Hero Comics and Reader Textualization: Participation and Narrative Construction

This is a piece that explores the idea of textualization in super-hero comics and how these stories are constructed. More than that, it is an introduction to exploring purpose — why are super-heroes so engaging… [more]

Another Reality: The Spatial Imperative, Part 2

Two weeks ago, I discussed the importance of space in storytelling, and the power of two-point perspective. I left you all with the notion that two-point perspective, while powerful, was not really the whole story —… [more]

The Walls of Samaris: A Classic French Comic You Probably Haven’t Read

Many fans of The Obscure Cities (which I introduced here) will tell you that the first volume, The Walls of Samaris, first collected in 1983, represents a freshman effort, despite the acclaim it’s won.

O Captain, My Captain (Part 1)

Captain America and Superman are pretty much universally recognized as the superheroes who best exemplify the values of justice and freedom that have been held up as our nation’s greatest achievements and still elusive goals since… [more]

Vulnerable, Disabled Children: Mark Waid, Grant Morrison, and Inspirational Super-Heroes

The Joker laughs manically as he holds Batman, supposedly dead. Despite the large amount of blood on the weapon and on Batman, this isn’t even the shocking part.

The Future of a Re-Fusion

Not long ago, I saw a post on the the Comics Beat by former Comics Journal contributor Robert Boyd remarking upon the virtual separation of the world of “mainstream comics” and “artcomics.”  Boyd didn’t comment… [more]

Sex and “The Man who Has Everything”

Long before Alan Moore delved into literary pornography with Lost Girls, he was infusing his work with a broad understanding of human sexuality as natural. And this wasn’t limited to auteur projects like Lost Girls… [more]

Why Carlie Cooper Matters (in Just One Panel)

It’s hard to suppress the suspicion that there are comic-book creators who have quite deliberately chosen to ignore the business of storytelling in favor of butt-shots and throw-downs, pin-ups and continuity porn.

All Things Must Pass: How Comic Books Can Never Grow Up

You and me, we are getting old. I know. It does suck.

The Origin of the Punisher and the Narrative Power of War

I do not think it is entirely unfair to suggest that the commonly agreed upon origin for the Punisher is focused on the idea of vengeance over the death of Frank Castle’s family. This is… [more]

All for One, One for All — The Super-Hero Story

I had originally planned to write this article at a later date, but after reading Cody Walker and Julian Darius’s columns this past week, I couldn’t resist the temptation to jump ahead. I’ve been brewing… [more]

Dan Dare and the Seductive Myths of Englishness

In the very first Dan Dare adventure, which began to be serialised weekly in the Christian boy’s comic Eagle in 1950, we’re introduced to the ”Inter Planet Space Fleet some years in the future.”

Captain Britain and the Comforting Myths of Englishness

In Paul Cornell’s Captain Britain and MI:13 #1, the eponymous Captain is killed by a Skrull missile during an alien invasion of Britain. As is the way of super-hero comics — and as was something of a habit… [more]

It Takes Two – Text & Image in Comics

So, comics as an art form! A truly legitimate art form, unique and self-actualized, with debacles and triumphs all its own. Not the bastard child of film and literature, and not just for kids, male adolescents, or… [more]

The Obscure Cities: An Introduction

The Obscure Cities (Les Cités Obscures) arose in the midst of a pivotal time in the history of French comics. So let’s talk about French comics, shall we?

He’s Not a Super-Hero, He’s Not Even a Very Naughty Boy: The Case Against Grant Morrison and Steve Yeowell’s Zenith

He’s a bad one, that Zenith, and we can be sure about that badness because the people who know assure us that it’s true.

Flashpoint: Hal Jordan and the Strange Askew Culture of Comic-Book Excellence

It’s impossible to believe that DC Comics was careless where it came to Flashpoint: Hal Jordan. They must have known exactly what it was that they were doing. The powers at 1700 Broadway, NYC, must… [more]

Erasing the Justice Society

In the continuity of DC’s relaunches, Superman will reportedly be the first super-hero. This implies that the Justice Society will have been wiped from continuity, and that seems to be DC’s current plan. This isn’t… [more]

Blame it on Hector: A Green Lantern Movie Review

I’ve wanted to watch a live-action Green Lantern movie ever since I was ten years old, so to say that I was excited for this film is a gross understatement.

Why I (Don’t) Hate Bat-Man, Part 2

In which we continue our look, begun here, at the first year of the Batman’s existence.