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Disney to Move Star Wars License from Dark Horse to Marvel

A couple of days ago Disney confirmed the news that pretty much any fan with some degree of pop culture awareness has seen coming for a year and a half now: this year the Star… [more]

What Marvel’s Miracleman #1 Preview Pages Indicate

A few days ago, Marvel released a five-page preview of its Miracleman #1, scheduled for 15 January publication. Having opined on what Marvel should do editorially with the series (and as the author of the… [more]

Slip and Slide

A few weeks ago, I went to the New York City Comic Con for the first time in my life and suffice it to say, it was an incredible experience.  From meeting creators who were… [more]

How “Tales of Asgard” Changed Everything

In Journey into Mystery #83 (Aug 1962), Donald Blake finds a magical walking stick that transforms him into Thor. It’s a rather inauspicious beginning. In that first story, Thor fights stone-skinned aliens, who simply land… [more]

I Once Was Blind: Waid’s Daredevil & How Expectations Can Ruin Even the Best of Things

I hated it. There, I said it, and like an alcoholic (“My name is Chris and I have a problem”), it feels good to get it off my chest. When I opened up the pages… [more]

Future Progressive, Past Regressive: Livewires

Adam Warren’s Livewires is Perfection. This is not a word I use lightly, especially when the thing involved is a one-off project by a person who is often considered a not-very-major-creator[1] ™ but Livewires: Clockwork… [more]

1986: D.P.7 — Group Therapy for Superhumans

In 1986, twenty-five years after the publication of Fantastic Four #1, which launched the modern Marvel Universe, Marvel editor in chief Jim Shooter introduced a new fictional reality in Marvel Comics, the New Universe. This… [more]

1986: Strikeforce: Morituri, Part 2: No Way Out

In Strikeforce: Morituri, the Marvel Comics series created by writer Peter B. Gillis and artist Brent Anderson, which debuted towards the end of 1986, the Earth of the late 21st century is under attack by… [more]

1986: Strikeforce: Morituri: We Who are About to Die

In many of the great comics of the year 1986, their creators were examining the medium and the genre in which they were working and their histories, critically reevaluating them and redefining them for a… [more]

On Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, by Sean Howe

Sean Howe begins his history of Marvel Comics in 1961 with publisher Martin Goodman ordering Stan Lee to produce a knock-off of rival DC’s new and successful Justice League of America.

Jason Aaron on Why Wolverine Endures

As a longtime writer of Wolverine both in Wolverine and the X-Men and the X-Men solo series, Jason Aaron knows the character well. But what is it that makes Wolverine such an enduring presence

X-Men #1-19 by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, et al (1963-66), Part 2

In the wake of their first public appearance, the X-Men appear to have been briefly embraced by the American people. Having defeated Magneto’s attempt to seize the U.S. military base of “Cape Citadel”, Cyclops and… [more]

Rob Liefeld on Leaving Marvel Comics in the Early ’90s

For the past twenty-five years, Rob Liefeld has been a best-selling and controversial comics creator. Here, he discusses working for Marvel Comics in the early ’90s and the changing corporate culture there that led him… [more]

X-Men #1-19 by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, et al (1963-66), Part 1

In a profoundly reactionary society, even a gentle and sincere challenge to the status quo can be read as a significant marker of dissent.

Sharpening the Image: Introduction

Comic readers from Gen X and (older members of) Gen Y remember 1992 as a sort of zeitgeist for comics.  Change was in the air in all strata of the field

The Adventures of Henry Pym (1962 to 1965)

Don’t print the legend. There was no such thing as an archetypal “Marvel superhero” for the first few years following the publication and unexpected success in 1961 of the Fantastic Four. What would in hindsight… [more]

On Iron Man in 1963, by Stan Lee, Don Heck, and Jack Kirby

Why should we care about Tony Stark? More importantly, why should we pity him?

Grant Morrison’s Day-Glo Years: Fantastic Four: 1234

Fantastic Four: 1234 was written at the tail end of Morrison’s Day-Glo Years, during his brief period writing for Marvel in the early 2000s.

Becoming Alan Moore

1. When did Alan Moore become ALAN MOORE? When did the promising prospect become the master Bardly craftsman? If his work for Marvel UK in the early 1980s is to be trusted, the graduation occurred… [more]

Marvel’s Spirit of Vengeance

A few days ago I donated some money to Gary Friedrich, the co-creator of Ghost Rider, one of Marvel Entertainment’s most popular properties.

On “Vengeance of the Molecule Man!”, by Steve Gerber, Gil Kane, and Joe Sinnott

There’s something of the world before the meteor fell about the Marvel Comics of the mid-Seventies. 

Super-Hero Prose: It’s About Damn Time

Marvel is branching out into legitimate publishing and I couldn’t be more excited.

The Heroic Struggle of Beta Ray Bill

This is a somewhat informal essay on a character that has fascinated me for a few years, Beta Ray Bill. While it echoes the work of folklorists and the hero narrative (Propp, Campbell, et al),… [more]

Justice for All

Fourth Age of Comics is an excellent blog site that examines modern comic book storytelling with a particular focus on the types of issues superheroes can effectively be used to address.

Why Carlie Cooper Matters (in Just One Panel)

It’s hard to suppress the suspicion that there are comic-book creators who have quite deliberately chosen to ignore the business of storytelling in favor of butt-shots and throw-downs, pin-ups and continuity porn.