Sequart Content Tagged:

Mark Millar

Magazine content related to Mark Millar (page 1 of 6)

RSS for RSS feed for Mark Millar

Sequart logoSmorgasbord #28: Sandcastles in the Sand

Tom and Shawn discuss recent news out of Baltimore, Mark Millar’s third run at playing Simon Cowell, the redemption of Chip Zdarsky, Genndy Tartakovsky’s CAGE!, Ta-Nehisi Coates’s upcoming run on Black Panther (and why people… [more]

Sequart logoSmorgasbord #25: How Dare You, Chip Zdarsky

Stephen Amell takes method acting to new levels, Mark Millar seeks greener pastures for his fertilizer, the Ignatz Awards nominees are announced, a new legal precedent for Kickstarter may have some interesting ripple effects, and… [more]

Chrononauts04_Review coverChrononauts Roars to an End in Issue #4

After four issues, which brings us to the end of the first story arc of Chrononauts, here’s the story in a nutshell: two irresponsible teenaged goofballs steal a hot car and proceed to have a… [more]

Chrononauts03_Review coverChrononauts #3: Early Review!

Chrononauts continues to be exuberant, good-hearted fun, and as we head into the last act of this four-issue arc, Quinn and Reilly are starting to encounter consequences to their extremely irresponsible (though fun) actions. Mark… [more]

Ultimate X-Men--The Tomorrow PeopleMark Millar’s Ultimate X-Men Vol. 1: The Tomorrow People

Mark Millar’s take on the X-Men is one of the most polarizing comics of the last decade. How does the debut of his reboot of the X-Men hold? [more]

thor-insaneThor is not a God, he’s a Lunatic: Realism in Ultimate Marvel

As the Ultimate Marvel Universe is reaching it’s conclusion it is worth looking back at the magnificent alternate universe. So much of the Ultimate Marvel Universe has helped to define both the Marvel Cinematic Universe… [more]

Chrononauts02_Review coverChrononauts #2: The Past is History

Time travel stories are always tough to write, because most sci fi writers spend an inordinate amount of time building the “rules” of the world. Specifically, they worry about “damaging” the timeline or introducing some… [more]

Chrononauts01_ReviewChrononauts: A Boy’s Own Adventure!

Chrononauts, the new comic from Mark Millar and Sean Gordon Murphy, is a wonderful grab-bag of genres and influences. Mixing a little bit of Stargate with a bit of Time Bandits and starring leading characters… [more]

cdn.indiewireJames Bond and Class Politics: Kingsman

Kingsman: The Secret Service is a killer action flick with a cool aesthetic, great actors, and a surprisingly vivid thematic bent. [more]

sdfPortraits In Alienated British Youth Circa 1989-90, Part Two: Trident Makes Its Mark—But Ultimately Gets Speared

In August of 1989, a modest little anthology series with some serious “A-list” talent appeared on British comic store shelves and, presumably, at a few newsstands (or newsagents, as they’re called across the pond) as… [more]

from 2003's Ultimates #12, by Millar, Hitch et al.Unashamed: In Which Concluding Remarks are Made and a Book is Announced, Shameless? The Superhero Tales of Mark Millar

I hate to break a promise, even if it’s made to no-one but myself. Yet things have changed since I typed “to be continued” at the foot of the last section of Shameless? to be… [more]

from Skrull Kill Krew  #4, by Morrison, Millar, Yeowell & Ivy.“New Paradigms for the Super Hero Team Structure?”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 45)

Continued from last week. No-one could accuse Morrison of being blind to Skrull Kill Krew’s satirical potential. In 1995, he spoke enthusiastically of the book’s capacity to discuss the likes of “catastrophy in the 20th… [more]

from 1995's Skrull Kill Krew #1, by Morrison, Millar, Yeowell, Ivy et al.“Until It Destroys Your Brain”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 44)

Continued from last week. Not everything in Morrison and Millar’s rebuffed pitches to Marvel went to waste. The former’s dogged belief in the quality of the Apocalypse 2099 proposal would have only been strengthened by… [more]

Jubilee & Wolverine, from the highly successful 1992 X-Men cartoon series.“It Would Have Made a Great Comic”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 43)

Continued from last week. Yet whatever its strengths, Morrison and Millar’s 2099 proposal went to waste, with a far less sweeping and less nostalgic series of changes being introduced instead. As part of the ongoing… [more]

scan 3“A Fading 2099 Universe”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 42)

Continued from last week. The problem with Skrull Kill Krew obviously wasn’t a lack of ambition on Morrison and Millar’s part. The same was true for several of their other substantial pitches to Marvel during… [more]

"Morrison & Miller(sic) Move Over To Marvel": The cover to 1995's Comics International #52, with a scan from Alan Davis' Captain Britain tales.“To Shoot Every Last Skrull On Earth”: On Skrull Kill Krew #1-5 (The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 41)

Continued from last week. Despite the precipitous collapse and subsequent flatlining of Swamp Thing’s sales in the second half of 1994, Millar’s career at the half-point of the decade still appeared to be in rude… [more]

from Mark Millar's Swamp Thing“About Sixty Per Cent Happy”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 40

Continued from last week. The rest of Millar’s Swamp Thing tales shared the same weaknesses as River Run, although they only intermittently reflected the same strengths. The likes of Twilight of The Gods and Chester… [more]

from Swamp Thing #158, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“So Many Questions are Left Unanswered”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 39

Continued from last week. For the third time in ten months, Millar’s Swamp Thing had presented abortion in a wholly negative light. Nothing that he’d write in the remainder of his tenure on the book… [more]

from Swamp Thing #157, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Why d’You Think God Created Abortion Clinics?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 38

Continued from last week. After abortion as a vehicle for laddish jokes and abortion as a means for evoking terror, Millar turned to abortion as a symbol of crass irresponsibility. (ST: 147/152/157) In Sink Or… [more]

from Swamp Thing #157, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Terminate This Pregnancy”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 37

Continued from last week. Millar makes more use of the topic of abortion in Swamp Thing than most superhero writers do in a lifetime. In each case, abortion is used either as a symbol of… [more]

from Swamp Thing #152, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Her Deepest, Hidden Secrets”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 36

Continued from last week. As so often before, Murder In The Dark saw Millar indulging in two of his greatest fascinations: body horror at the expense of helpless female victims and the tradition and dogma… [more]

from Swamp Thing #153, by Millar, Hester et al.“Do You Remember Earth Two or Earth X?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 35

Continued from last week. Though Millar’s River Run tales are rarely anything other than predictable, they’re also undeniably focused, purposeful and enthusiastically told. Even when he’s sketching out the inevitably baleful career of a psychopathic… [more]

from Swamp Thing #153, by Millar & Chris Weston.“There is Something Wrong with This World”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 34

Continued from last week. Even when Millar put an appropriately exotic backdrop to use, he frequently neutered its dramatic potential. The desert setting used to conclude the first arc was portrayed in an entirely throwaway… [more]

crop from John Totleben's cover to 1976's Swamp Thing #171.“Not Walking in Alan Moore’s Footsteps”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 33

Continued from last week. Of course, there’s no reason why an obvious ending can’t also be a satisfying one. Similarly, a protagonist that seems to lack personality or potency can still be used in a… [more]

from Swamp Thing #158, by Millar, Hester, DeMulder et al.“Even The Worst Among Them Has Potential”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 32

Continued from last week. So, the Millar who wrote Swamp Thing was enthusiastic, ambitious, and ethically engaged. But for all his efforts and good intentions, and for all the occasional highpoint, the run was heavy-handed,… [more]