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Mark Millar

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Superior featuredMark Millar’s Superior: A Loving Tribute to the Super-Hero

“After all the deconstruction, Superior was planned as a RECONSTRUCTION of the superhero. A warm-hearted tribute to why we need them.” –Mark Millar, April 15, 2014 As longtime readers of Sequart may notice, I don’t… [more]

Cover to 1998’s JLA Paradise Lost #3, by Ariel Olivetti“Forgive me, Superman. I’m not very good at losing.” – The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 14

Continued from last week Some in the UK fan community saw Millar as Morrison’s heir apparent on the JLA. But despite later claiming that he’d once turned down the chance to write the Justice League,… [more]

Panel from 1997’s JLA #4, By Morrison, Porter, Dell et al“An Arrogant, Aristocratic Batman?”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 13

Continued from last week. But how were Morrison and Millar to explain away the Batman’s aloof and frequently contemptuous attitude towards even his fellow super-heroes? If the Dark Knight was to be cut away from the… [more]

by Millar & Kelly Jones, from 1997’s JLA Secret Files & Origins“This is Not a Dream, but a Plan”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 12

Continued from last week. There are other indications that Millar might have been a major contributor to the new JLA’s origin tale. In the Justice League’s own title, Morrison had scrupulously ensured that his innovations were… [more]

By Morrison, Porter, Dell et al, from 1996/7’s JLA #1The Secret Origin of the JLA, and of “Mark Millar” Too: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 11

Continued from last week. It would be another seven months until Morrison and Millar’s next public collaboration on the Batman. In that time, the new JLA title would establish itself as a remarkably successful reboot. Its… [more]

Cover from the 2008 Aztek TPB – and before it the comic’s 1st issue in 1996 -  by N Steve Harris & Keith ChampagneThe Batman As Father Figure: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar Part 10

Continued from here. DC’s post-crisis, Dark Age portrayal of the Batman had long been a source of aggravation for both Morrison and Millar. Years before Morrison landed the job of scripting the JLA, the two men… [more]

from 1997’s JLA #9, by Morrison, Oscar Jimenez et al“A Semi-Unhinged, Essentially Humourless Loner Struggling with Rage and Guilt”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 9

Continued from last week. Grant Morrison’s ambition was, it appears, to free the DCU from the constraints of both wonder-killing editorial dictats and the conventions of the Dark Age. Yet unregulated creative anarchy doesn’t seem to… [more]

From 1997’s JLA Secret Files #1, by Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, Howard Porter et alA Thousand Batmen Blooming: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 8

Continued from last week. The superhero genre had become more and more susceptible to the myth of the definitive version. It was a fan-consuming fallacy which presumed that each character possessed an irreducible core of utterly… [more]

JLAPulling Out of the Dark Age?: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 7

Continued from last week. It’s only to be expected that Millar’s work on the JLA would mesh with Grant Morrison’s agenda. But it is remarkable how closely and effectively Millar’s contributions reflected his friend’s wider ambitions… [more]

by Morrison, Millar, Paul Ryan, John Nyberg et al, from 1997’s The Flash #130“How Can You Possibly Live in a World Without Superheroes?”: The American Superhero Comics Of Mark Millar, Part 6

Continued from last week. Who was responsible for what in Morrison and Millar’s many collaborations? Credit boxes are often little help at all. Stories which carried the Morrison/Millar by-line were on occasion the product of an… [more]

cover to 1998’s Superman Adventures #25, by Rick Burchett, Terry Austin & Marie Severin“Nice to Meet You, Big Guy!”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 5

Continued from last week. Though he’d never again see one of his scripts feature in any of the Batman’s many headlining titles, Millar would return to the character over and over again throughout the Nineties. It’s… [more]

From LOTDK #79 by Millar, Yeowell, Giordano“Just Don’t Do It Again”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 4

Continued from last week. How was it possible for Millar to show so much respect for Bruce Wayne’s back story while portraying such a deeply unconvincing Dark Knight? Though the writer’s take on Wayne was ludicrously… [more]

Cover to December 1971’s Batman #239, in which lay O’Neil, Novick & Giordano’s Silent Night, Deadly Night“There are Some Things in Life It’s Best not to See”: The American Superhero Comics of Mark Millar, Part 3

Continued from last week. The suspicion that Millar idled his way through his years at 2000AD is at least in part countered by the contents of Favourite Things. For it seems unlikely that he would have… [more]

cover to 1996’s LOTDK #79 by Steve Yeowell and Dick Giordano“Yes, Alfred. Time for Bed.”: The American Comics of Mark Millar, Part 2

Continued from last week. Favourite Things was the first mainstream superhero tale that Millar had ever sold. Previously, he’d depicted the costumed crimefighter as a horror-hybridised symbol of corruption and cruelty, as with The Saviour and… [more]

scan1Enter Mr. … Miller?: The American Comics of Mark Millar, Part 1

Continued from here. Exactly when Grant Morrison landed Mark Millar the job of scripting Swamp Thing is hard to pinpoint. Millar has hinted that the GLASCAC comic convention in the late April of 1993 may have… [more]

scan1AThe Best of Millar: The 10 Most Enjoyable Examples of Mark Millar’s Work for UK Publishers, 1989-1997

As in last week’s “worst-of”, the following selections are presented in no order of preference; 1. Tales From Beyond Science: Long Distance Calls, with artist Rian Hughes, from 1992’s 2000AD #776. Just as I could… [more]

scanAAAThe Worst of Millar: The 10 Least Commendable Examples of Mark Millar’s Work for UK Publishers, 1989-1997

Shameless? will be moving on in the new year to discuss Mark Millar’s post-1993 career with a host of American publishers. But before setting out in the direction of Swamp Thing, Skrull Kill Krew and… [more]

from Canon Fodder II, by Neil Long/Kew-W & Chris Weston, as reprinted by 2000AD in 2009“Where’s Canon Fodder?”: Shameless? Part 36

Continued from last week. Though pinpointing exactly when Millar stopped working for 2000AD is an difficult business, he’d most definitely moved onto the American market by the time Canon Fodder returned without him in 1996. With the… [more]

cover to 2000ad 864 by Gary Erskine“I Only Wanted To Be Loved”: Shameless? Part 35

Continued from two weeks ago. Canon Fodder reads as if two distinct stories had been awkwardly spliced together. In its first half, it’s the tale of how the Canon, Doctor Watson and Mycroft Holmes desperately combine… [more]

scan340“Keep Calm. I’ll Wrap This Up Quickly.”: Shameless? Part 34

Continued from last week. The world-building that Millar had begun to invest in Canon Fodder was unusually rich, distinctly quirky, and full of promise. Yet that surprising combination of Catholicism, Holmesian characters, alt-world SF and superheroes… [more]

from the 2008 reprint of Canon Fodder, by Mark Millar & Chris Weston“Bones Gnawed to the Marrow”: Shameless? Part 33

Continued from last week. “I had no idea what I was doing for the most part and just learning how to do very basic stuff then. Only good stuff I’d recommend would be Big Dave (which… [more]

scan1“Two Tickets for My Next Performance”: Shameless? Part 32

Continued from last week. So how did Morrison and Millar use the pages of Big Dave to express their contempt for homophobia? Starting from the premise that their readers were similarly liberal-minded, they studded the strip’s… [more]

by Steve Parkhouse, Morrison & Millar, from 1993’s 2000AD #845“We Were Just Trying to Bring Peace to the Planet”: Shameless? Part 31

Continued from last week. The urge to stereotype Millar’s beliefs in the light of his least liberal scripts is an understandable one. Yet his work is anything but consistent on matters of social justice. As I’ve… [more]

by Parkhouse, Millar and Morrison, from 1993’S 2000AD 846“Bog Off Back to Mars”: Shameless? Part 30

Continued from last week. It’s not that Big Dave is without its pleasures, although the vast majority of them are to be found in Steve Parkhouse’s boisterously dynamic artwork. Though even he couldn’t compensate for the… [more]

2000AD #843“A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic”: Shameless? Part 29

Continued from last week. Given the evidence, it would be hard to argue that much of Millar’s work for 2000AD wasn’t worryingly homophobic. The best that might be said of a number of his scripts is… [more]