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The Continuity Pages:

Dune

The Dune franchise began with Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel, simply titled Dune. Although famously refused by several publishers, in part because of its long length and esoteric story, the novel would go on to exert a profound influence over science fiction.

Herbert followed the novel with five sequels (in 1969, 1976, 1981, 1984, and 1985) before his death on 11 February 1986. The first novel was adapted as a big-budget movie, directed by David Lynch and released in 1984. Although it flopped at the box office, it helped spur interest in the books and the rapid publication of Herbert’s final two Dune novels.

For 15 years after Herbert’s death, the franchise languished. Beginning in 1999, Frank Herbert’s son Brian Herbert collaborated with sci-fi author Kevin J. Anderson on new Dune novels, beginning with a three-novel prequel to the original Dune. Titled “Prelude to Dune,” the three novels were released annually from 1999-2001. During this time, the Sci Fi Channel broadcast, in late 2000, a new mini-series adaptation of Dune.

Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson then began an even earlier three-novel prequel, titled “Legends of Dune” and released annually (without a break from the earlier prequel trilogy) from 2002-2004. With six books in six years, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson had authored as many Dune books as Frank Herbert himself. During this time, the Sci Fi Channel produced a mini-series sequel to its 2000 production, combining material from Herbert’s second and third novels under the title Children of Dune, broadcast in early 2003.

The book series’s 2005 offering, The Road to Dune, was a companion to the series and included Spice Planet, an alternate version of the original Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson based upon Frank Herbert’s original outline for the novel. For 2006 and 2007, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson offered two novels (sometimes called “Dune 7″) that concluded, based on notes left by Frank Herbert, the storylines that Frank Herbert’s final novel had left unfinished.

In 2008, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson began a new series of four books, titled “Heroes of Dune,” focusing on particular characters and taking place between Frank Herbert’s original novels. Only the first two books were published, in 2008 and 2009, before the series went on hiatus, after 11 annual books. Although Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson planned to return to the series, they announced that they would first complete a new prequel trilogy, a sequel to “Legends of Dune.” That trilogy was published in 2012, 2014, and 2016.

While the Dune franchise is best remembered for Frank Herbert’s original six novels, especially his first three, the Dune series is largely a series of books authored by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson in the first decade of the 2000s.

The Butlerian Jihad

Dune: The Butlerian Jihad
occurs 10,000 years before Dune; 624 pages; published 17 Sept 2002
Dune: The Machine Crusade
624 pages; published 16 Sept 2003
Dune: The Battle of Corrin
620 pages; published 17 Aug 2004
Sisterhood of Dune
496 pages; published 3 Jan 2012
Mentats of Dune
448 pages; published 11 Mar 2014
Navigators of Dune
448 pages; published 13 Sept 2016

Main Sequence

Dune: House Atreides
first Dune novel by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson; begins 35 years before Dune; 624 pages; published 5 Oct 1999
Dune: House Harkonnen
624 pages; published 3 Oct 2000
Dune: House Corrino
512 pages; published 2 Oct 2001
Dune
412 pages; published 1965
Dune movie
Dune TV mini-series
Paul of Dune
divided into seven parts, with the even parts focused on a young Paul Atreides and set between House Corrino and Dune, while the odd parts focus on the early period of his Fremen jihad between Dune and Dune Messiah; 512 pages; published 16 Sept 2008
Dune Messiah
occurs 12 years after Dune; 256 pages; published 1969
The Winds of Dune
divided into five parts, with the odd parts focused on Lady Jessica immediately after the events of Dune Messiah, while part two occurs between House Corrino and Dune, and part four occurs between Dune and Dune Messiah; initially titled Jessica of Dune; 448 pages; published 4 Aug 2009
Children of Dune
occurs nine years after Dune Messiah; published 1976
Children of Dune TV mini-series
combines and adapts Dune Messiah and Children of Dune; 266 minutes; aired 16 Mar 2003

The Golden Path

God Emperor of Dune
occurs 3500 years after Dune; published 28 May 1981
Heretics of Dune
occurs 5000 years after Dune; published 1984
Chapterhouse: Dune
Frank Herbert’s sixth and final Dune novel; 464 pages; published Apr 1985
Hunters of Dune
paperback edition also contains the short story “Dune: Treasure in the Sand” (by the same authors); 528 pages; published 22 Aug 2006
Sandworms of Dune
496 pages; published 7 Aug 2007

Other

The Road to Dune

“Spice Planet”

  • written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, based upon Frank Herbert’s original outline for Dune
  • novel-length

“Letters of Dune

  • non-fiction letters detailing Frank Herbert’s difficulties getting Dune published

“They Stopped the Moving Sands”

  • written by Frank Herbert
  • an incomplete article about sand dunes that inspired Dune

“Missing Chapters from Dune and Dune Messiah

  • written by Frank Herbert
  • deleted and alternate scenes from Frank Herbert’s first two Dune novels

“A Whisper on Caladan Seas”

  • written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
  • short story

“Hunting Harkonnens”

  • written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
  • short story

“Whipping Mek”

  • written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
  • short story

“The Faces of a Martyr”

  • written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
  • short story

“Dune: Sea Child”

  • written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
  • short story
  • originally published in Elemental, a 2006 benefit anthology for children who survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami
  • only included in the paperback edition

strangely does not include Frank Herbert’s short story “The Road to Dune” (from which the book takes its name); 489 pages; published Sept 2005