Brian Cowlishaw

Brian Cowlishaw grew up in rural Idaho, then earned his Ph.D. in English at the University of Oklahoma in 1998. He has taught and published on many areas of literature and popular culture, especially science fiction and fantasy. He is a Harper Voyager Super Reader, reviewing advance reader copies for the publisher. He currently teaches literature and writing at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. He has recently published on A Song of Ice and Fire and Breaking Bad. He is an avid gamer (board and video), and a big fan of all things related to India. Email: cowlishb@nsuok.edu. Twitter: @BrianCowlishaw. Brian's ongoing fiction project: thisisnozzy.blogspot.com. Brian's blog about teaching himself Hindi: biggora.blogspot.com.

MAGAZINE CONTENT BY BRIAN COWLISHAW (17 TOTAL)

Image1 34 3 2 1: Paul Auster’s New Postmodern Masterpiece

First, turn off your computer or smart phone—yes, right now—grab 4 3 2 1, and plow straight through it. True, it’s almost 900 pages long, but trust me, you won’t want it to end. I’ll… [more]

Image3Money and Trade at the End of the World

Every video roleplaying game has basically the same setup: shops offering increasingly powerful items and equipment accompany the path toward the final boss. You sell your junk there, make repairs, upgrade cloth armor to leather… [more]

Image1Overwatch: The Pleasures of Not Giving a Damn about the Story

Overwatch, launched just a month ago, is a new MOBA (multiplayer online battle arena) in which teams of six human-controlled players battle six-person teams controlled by humans or the computer, your choice. Each player chooses… [more]

Image2Science Fiction Elements of Infinite Jest: Part 3, Subsidized Time

The twentieth-anniversary rereading and discussion of the greatest novel ever written, David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, has just ended. The discussion continues, and this is part of it. Many thousands of fans worldwide including me… [more]

Image1Science Fiction Elements of Infinite Jest: Part 2, Giant Feral Hamsters and Infants

A worldwide reread of the greatest novel ever written, David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, is currently underway, celebrating twenty years since its first publication. “Infinite Winter” began January 31; readers consume about 75 pages per… [more]

Image2 2Sid and Marty Krofft’s Wormholes to Hell

If you’re an American of a certain age, chances are you fondly remember the weird and wonderful worlds dreamed up by Sid and Marty Krofft—especially H. R. Pufnstuf, Lidsville, and Land of the Lost. Those… [more]

image1Ernest Cline’s Armada: One Remove Too Many

At last, Ernest Cline, best-selling author of Ready Player One, has released his second novel, Armada. RPO was so fun to read, and so perfectly constructed, that its follow-up was bound to be disappointing. And… [more]

Zee TV of India’s promotional shot for Maha Rakshak Aryan. The Hindi text says: “Starting November 1. Fri-Sun 7 pm.”Superhero Fever Strikes India: Maharakshak Aryan on Zee TV

You can hardly swing an unconscious henchman without hitting a superhero in American popular culture these days. Solo and in teams, superheroes dominate our comics and movies; they’re making rapid inroads on television too, on… [more]

image1John Scalzi’s Lock In: Fifty Pounds of Story in a Twenty-Pound Sack

Lock In, the new science fiction novel by Hugo winner John Scalzi, boasts the density of a red dwarf. It’s a hardboiled detective novel, and a surprisingly plausible “future history,” and an exploration of identity… [more]

Image1The Circle by Dave Eggers: Let’s All “Like” Our Transparent Dystopia!

[Note: This article contains many spoilers; it would be impossible to write without them. Also, The Circle was published a full year ago, and it explores social media’s effects on knowledge, socializing, privacy, and politics—as… [more]

The O.N.A.N. seal. The American eagle wears a sombrero (symbolizing Mexico), and clutches a maple leaf (symbolizing Canada) and cleaning products (which germaphobic then-president Johnny Gentle uses compulsively).Science Fiction Elements of Infinite Jest: Part 1, Videophony

David Foster Wallace’s 1996 novel Infinite Jest is, for my money, the greatest novel ever written. It appears regularly near the top of “best novels of all time” lists such as Time Magazine’s. It has… [more]

Image2Basic Instructions Creator Now Writes Novels

Many of you Sequart readers already know Scott Meyer from his popular webcomic Basic Instructions. The comic is thoroughly venerable by internet standards, having written and posted it since 2003. Here is a fairly typical… [more]

Image1An Open Reply to Fantasy Author Patrick Rothfuss

Patrick, In your most recent blog post, you replied to an article that I wrote for Sequart, “Six Reasons Why the Kingkiller Chronicle is the Next Game of Thrones.” You wrote: “Over the years, I’ve been… [more]

Image1Stunt Writing Yields a Brilliant Novel: Dave Eggers’s Newest

Imagine you’re a novelist who gambles. You lose a big bet, and the buddy you lost to decides to make your writing life incredibly difficult. He sets these restrictions for your next novel, and as… [more]

Lee Horsley saves the damsel in distress, fights the tyrannical ruler and evil magician, and rallies the good guys in The Sword and the Sorcerer.Sword-and-Sorcery Movies: They Just Don’t Make Them Like That Anymore

Remember films like Conan the Barbarian, Labyrinth, and The Sword and the Sorcerer? Fantasy movies of the late 1970s and early 80s with lots of swords and sorcery, where the good guys always won? Remember… [more]

Decent Hour Picture 1Review of Joshua Ferris’s To Rise Again at a Decent Hour

Joshua Ferris just released his third novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, and like his previous two, this one is insightful, fascinating, and just a hair’s breadth short of perfect. Better than any… [more]

Rothfuss CartoonSix Reasons Why the Kingkiller Chronicle is the Next Game of Thrones

Everyone knows about Game of Thrones – seriously, everyone. Fantasy fiction fans can gloat that they’ve known about it since 1996, when George R. R. Martin published the first Thrones novel. The HBO series has… [more]

STATISTICS FOR BRIAN COWLISHAW

Total Words for All Magazine Content: 22,386